Tomek Kondrat · Mar 14, 2014 at 09:30 pm

Access Your Favorite Apps Directly from Your Lock Screen

OEMs often what you can do by default using their firmware. This often results in the loss of a certain feature, which can be annoying. Loading a custom ROM is not always an option because sometimes phones are locked and don’t allow users to flash custom firmware.

Lucky, Xposed Framework allows you to modify stock and custom ROMs with hundreds of modules available here on XDA. One such module was recently developed by XDA Recognized Developer kevdliu. Quick Access allows you to open your favorite applications directly from the lock screen. For example, you can launch your favorite music player or calendar without unlocking your phone or tablet.

A few things are required to make this module work with your devices, but everything is explained in the thread. This module really helps to save you the time, especially on ROMs without such a feature built-in. To try this module, ensure that your device is rooted, Xposed Framework installed, and that the module enabled in the Xposed installer application.

You can get the newest version of the module by visiting the original thread.


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Tomek Kondrat

eagleeyetom is an editor on XDA-Developers, the largest community for Android users. Tomek is the only Polish moderator on XDA Developers. He graduated from the University of Warmia and Mazury in Olsztyn with a degree in journalism and public communication in 2013. He's a big fan of football (not hand egg), post rock and cooking. A total addict of mobile technology, especially Android. Currently flashes dozens of custom ROMs on his OPO. View eagleeyetom's posts and articles here.
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