Jimmy McGee · Sep 17, 2013 at 06:00 am

App Development Presentations Offer Good Advice

It’s been over a month since XDA:DevCon 2013 took place.  It’s been 2 weeks since we’ve uploaded some of the presentations to YouTube. There were many different presentations and some of the best presentations offered advice and good programming ideas to help app developers.

The first presentation was from Commonsware Founder, Mark Murphy. Mark is the author of “The Busy Coder’s Guide to Android Development,” and is active in supporting the Android developer community. In his presentation “Plugin Architectures for Android,” Mark talked about how the best way to expand the capabilities of your app without impacting core functionality is to build plugins and make your app plugin-capable. This allows the main app to be more secure, request less permissions, be smaller and other great advantages. To learn more, check out the video.

The second presentation covering app development was not as technical as Mark’s presentation, but was nonetheless important. This presentation was given by Daniel Nazer. Daniel is a Staff Attorney on the Electronic Frontier Foundation’s intellectual property team, focusing on patent reform. In his presentation “Patent Trolls vs. App Developers,” Daniel talks about the grim reality that is patent trolling. Given how some patent holding companies, companies that don’t contribute to society any inventions and instead pick up patents for cheap in bankruptcy liquidations then arbitrarily apply their patents to software, are suing little guys who don’t have the resources to fight back—holding them up for ransom! Daniel talks about a number of proposed reforms being considered by Congress. He gives developers steps they must take to minimize the risk of becoming the latest patent troll road kill.

Finally, after all this work of making your app modular, adding support for plugins, and development around patent troll risks; app developers may be wondering whether to pursue the field. Our next presenter tries to help add some positive to the app development grind. Ariel Shimoni, Director of Publisher Relations at StartApp, offers a presentation called, “Monetization: Making Money From Your Free Android App.” In this presentation, Ariel talks about the Play Store growing at an incredible rate. He looks for the best strategy to consistently generate revenue in this “free” ecosystem. Ariel, talks about four different monetization options, and he analyzes what apps work best with each option.

If you want to see more or get a copy of the presentations slides, visit the XDA:DevCon Presentations page.


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Jimmy McGee

JimmyMcGee is an editor on XDA-Developers, the largest community for Android users. View JimmyMcGee's posts and articles here.
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