egzthunder1 · Oct 5, 2011 at 04:28 pm

Carriers Take Cover – Privacy Notices Start Rolling Out (And A Note From The Portal Admin)

Well, it seems that when we make something happen, we do it in a rather large scale. After the whole thing with the services that XDA Recognized Developer TrevE, and what is yet to come, it seems that some carriers have started taking preemptive measurements by sending out Privacy notices to their customers. It looks like the first one to act like this was Verizon Wireless. We received word from a few customers that they had received notifications by e-mail regarding the use of all their customer’s personal information and data that gets gathered by the ciq services in the HTC devices. In the notification, they go about what kind of information is collected and even go as far as putting out examples of things that they will use the data for, such as marketing, feedback, and a few other permissible uses of said information.

You have to remember that back a few weeks, HTC told us that out of the 5 services that were pointed out by TrevE, 3 were theirs and the remaining two were carrier based, which means that they likely are getting wind that their code may be defective as well. We will likely see these going down the same way as the one published last Friday as well. At this point in time, there is no more denying any of these. A few months back, when the CIQ’s came to light, several carriers gave people the run around, and some even went as far as denying their existence, all of which was futile as there was rather tangible proof of these service being very real, evidence that is about to get even more real.

Verizon Wireless will use the following categories of information:
Mobile Usage Information:

Addresses of websites you visit when using our wireless service. These data strings (or URLs)
may include search terms you have used

Location of your device ("Location Information")

App and device feature usage
Consumer Information:

Information about your use of Verizon products and services (such as data and calling features,
device type, and amount of use)

Demographic and interest categories provided to us by other companies, such as gender, 
age range, sports fan, frequent diner, or pet owner ("Demographics")

 

One last comment before I finish this one off. I pride myself in the work that my team and I do to bring the best and latest news from around xda-developers over to your PC/smartphone/internet enabled device. The work that we do is not unique and we know that the internet is a rather fast way of spreading news in a global scale and everyone likes to report things in their own way. However, I personally do believe in giving credit where credit is due and I find it extremely distasteful when the original sources are not cited and what is worse, when someone claims credit for something that they have not done. Earlier today, I was pointed to the following article which came out in the BBC website. According to the article, Android Police was the source of this whole HTC security thing and while I hate showing emotions during my writing, this simply infuriated me, especially as I read the article that BBC referred to. Before you can say anything back, here are all the articles in the series, articles that I have been writing for over a month now regarding this issue.

http://tinyurl.com/4xwn69t
tinyurl.com/6kyh2m7
tinyurl.com/3olweh4
tinyurl.com/432rczh

Moreover, I have been in direct contact with HTC for even longer regarding this, and all of the sudden they claim credit for my hard work. With all due respect to Android Police and the author whom I will not mention by name, if this is how you operate your news reporting, let me tell you that your work ethic is deplorable. I hope that from now on, you do the right thing and cite your sources and most importantly, you don’t claim ownership on work that isn’t your own.

Sincerely,

egzthunder1

Portal Administrator

Want something published in the Portal? Contact any News Writer.

 

Administrator Edit: I would like to personally apologize to Android Police for this. I have already explained my point(s) to the author of the article and all necessary amendments have been done to reflect the credit that was missing for the findings. Thank you for your understanding.


_________
Want something on the XDA Portal? Send us a tip!

egzthunder1

egzthunder1 is an editor on XDA-Developers, the largest community for Android users. I have been an active member of xda-developers since 2005 and have gone through various roles in my time here. I am Former Portal Administrator, and currently part of the administrator team while maintaining my writer status for the portal. In real life, I am a Chemical Engineer turned Realtor in the Miami area. View egzthunder1's posts and articles here.
Mike McCrary · Jul 31, 2015 at 03:56 pm · 1 comment

CloudPlayer: DIY HiFi Music Streaming Solution

In our Helpful Guide to Music Streaming Services, we mentioned several different services that offer ways to stream catalogs of music directly to your device. While each service has their benefits and drawbacks, the common theme among them is to give you access to a vast library of music without the need to store your own, and charge you a monthly fee for the privilege. But what if you already had access to your own catalog of music? Sure, there...

XDA NEWS
GermainZ · Jul 31, 2015 at 01:03 pm · 1 comment

Optimize Battery Life with This Useful App

Battery life is an important aspect of your smartphone, especially if you use it for more than just calls on the go. Since you're on XDA, you probably do and want to get the most out of your battery. Now, you can't magically expand its size but no matter how much its capacity is, you should make sure it's not draining faster than it should be. Your phone's processor runs at different frequencies when you're using the device. The CPU...

XDA NEWS
Mario Tomás Serrafero · Jul 31, 2015 at 11:00 am · 3 comments

The OnePlus 2 & The Year of Smartphone Compromises

We are very close to entering the last third of 2015, and we have now seen many of the biggest flagship lines issue their latest iterations. Phones like the LG G4 and Galaxy S6 were some of the most anticipated devices in smartphone history, and the hype surrounding the M9 and OnePlus 2 had us discussing for weeks. But for the most part, the awe has vanished.   There is a feeling that virtually all of us at the XDA office...

XDA NEWS