Will Verduzco · May 16, 2011 at 06:00 am

CF3D Proxy Driver Brings New Method for NightMode, Promises Much More

Remember Jeff Sharkey’s NightMode SurfaceFlinger patch, which brought much needed power saving effects to OLED screens and has since been merged into CyanogenMod? Now XDA moderator Chainfire has accomplished something quite similar as a proof of concept for his CF3D intermediary proxy driver.

You may be wondering why an alternate method of obtaining the same effect could possibly be interesting. While inherently this doesn’t sound too exciting for most, CF3D has many potential uses such as working around arbitrary texture compression format restrictions found in certain applications. How big of an issue is this? If you’re lucky enough to be sporting one of the brand new Samsung Galaxy S II devices and are trying to play X-Plane, it could be a huge problem. Additionally, if you’re not running a ROM with Night Mode already integrated, this could be exciting merely at face value.

In the words of the developer:

About
NightMode itself is an implementation of Jeff Sharkey’s excellent power-saving and night-vision-preserving idea for surfaceflinger effects. Really, you should read that link.

The red mode is great in darkness as it does a good job preserving night-vision, for me the power-saving is secondary (power-saving is on OLED screens only)

Unlike Jeff’s original article, NightMode is NOT based on surfaceflinger (or other) source modifications, the same effect (more or less) is achieved by using a proxy driver I call CF3D. NightMode serves as the first test of this driver, which will ultimately try to make games run on your device that normally do not.

If you are running CM, you have a similar option already in your settings (which uses the surfaceflinger method).

CF3D driver
The CF3D driver used in the app is a proof-of-concept proxy driver I’m building. It’s ultimate purpose is to serve as a compatibility layer and to implement some extra features, for example various texture format support – to work around devs who want to be Nvidia- or HTC- only or are just lazy and only support one texture format. Or in normal people English: make games work that don’t 

CF3D is dangerous
The installation of the CF3D driver is not without risk. So far it has worked for everyone who has tried to install it, but you should definitely make a CWM backup before trying!

Stay tuned or continue on to the original thread to track the CF3D’s progress and to get your hands on some NightMode action!


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Will Verduzco

willverduzco is an editor on XDA-Developers, the largest community for Android users. Will Verduzco is the Portal Administrator for the XDA-Developers Portal. He has been addicted to mobile technology since the HTC Wizard. But starting with the Nexus One, his gadget love affair shifted to Google's little green robot. He is also a Johns Hopkins University graduate in neuroscience and is now currently studying to become a physician. View willverduzco's posts and articles here.
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