Haroon Q. Raja · Jan 13, 2013 at 02:00 am

Clean Bloatware, Nexus 4 UI Elements, Some Andriod 4.2 Apps on the i9300 with PalaTool

Many Android device manufacturers ship devices with their custom skins such as Samsung TouchWiz, Motorola MotoBLUR, and HTC Sense, among others. In addition, several carriers also bundle certain apps along with their devices that are by no means necessary, and are not a part of Android. While there are several ways of removing all of this bloat, most of these methods involve manually deleting files using a root-level file browser. If you don’t wish to bother with the manual method of removing bloatware, PalaTool offers some assistance for Samsung Galaxy S III i9300 owners.

Developed by XDA Forum Member shahar2k9, and based on the excellent AROMA script for recovery-based installations, PalaTool (short for Paladin Tool) not only allows you to remove several bloatware apps and services from your device, but also lets you add Nexus 4 style UI elements, the latest CyanogenMod APN list, and certain Android 4.2 stock apps. Furthermore, it also lets you format your /system, /data, and /cache partitions, as well as wipe Dalvik cache. Obviously, these tasks are already possible on essentially all custom recoveries, but it is nice to streamline the experience and do everything from one interface.

Since the tool is in AROMA format, you need a custom recovery installed to use it. While the tool was originally meant for the Galaxy S III i9300, other Samsung devices with similar OS builds. That said, the Android 4.2 stock apps and Nexus 4 UI elements should work on any device running Jelly Bean (and perhaps ICS too), and the CyanogenMod APN list should work on any device running ICS or later.

You can find the download link as well as the complete list of removable bloatware in the forum thread.


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