Will Verduzco · Jan 6, 2014 at 09:30 pm

Epson Moverio BT-200 Takes on Google Glass with Head-Motion Tracking, Camera, Stereoscopic qHD Display

In late 2011, Epson released the Moverio BT-100 Wearable Display. While the device was quite an innovation at the time, it was just a bit too rough around the edges to gain any appreciable amount of popularity. Then, Google Glass happened. And with it, wearable computing was thrust directly into the limelight.

Now, Epson has announced the successor to its two-year-old Moverio BT-100, the oh-so-creatively titled Moverio BT-200. Given its pricing and featureset, it seems to have one clear target: Google Glass. Although many still question whether a head-mounted device with a camera is socially acceptable at this time, Epson thinks that it can make an impact with this update to the Moverio line.

In comparison to Google Glass, it is aggressively priced at just under half the cost of the current XE model. Furthermore, it features true binocular optics, which overlay real-time content placed over the center of your field of view. This in turn allows for more powerful augmented reality applications, at the potential expense of increased distraction and vision obstruction.

Using Epson’s optical talents from years of work on projector lenses, the BT-200 offers a 23-degree field-of-view, with 360-degree panoramas possible through the use of head tracking. The semi-transparent screen’s resolution is a bit higher than Google Glass, at qHD (960×540), and the additional sensors will make for a potentially more immersive experience than what is currently possible on Glass. As such, many initial game demos are available already. The Moverio BT-200 will run on Android 4.0 (presumably very heavily skinned).

The Moverio BT-200 will most likely be available in March and will cost just under $700. Those looking to pre-order can do so here. And if you’d simply like to take a look at the Press Release,  you can do so here. Are you interested in the Moverio BT-200, or would you much prefer Google Glass? Let us know your thoughts in the comments below.


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Will Verduzco

willverduzco is an editor on XDA-Developers, the largest community for Android users. Will Verduzco is the Portal Administrator for the XDA-Developers Portal. He has been addicted to mobile technology since the HTC Wizard. But starting with the Nexus One, his gadget love affair shifted to Google's little green robot. He is also a Johns Hopkins University graduate in neuroscience and is now currently studying to become a physician. View willverduzco's posts and articles here.
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