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Understanding the philosophy behind Metro UI

Undoubtedly, the most interesting and unique point about Windows Phone 7 is its user interface called Metro. With its elegant, oversized font and extreme simplicity and cleanness, it looks like nothing we’ve ever seen before (except from the Zune HD).

But, thinking of it, what exactly defines Metro? The blue tiles on the home screen? The font? The black background? Of course, those are all part of the user experience, but not its defining guiding principles. Take a look at the screenshots below:

The first screenshot shows the standard HTC Sense on current Windows Mobile devices, while the second one shows a customized version with HDWalls, an application developed by a forum member. You clearly see that the second one gets rid all those clock panels, appointment backgrounds and slider bars, which is exactly the key philosophy behind Metro – the chromeless look.

Especially when compared to the iPhone or Android, the benefits of this design become obvious. Though it may not suit everyone’s taste, it certainly foucuses much more on the actual content, the text, instead of buttons or toolbars, and simply looks incredibly elegant.

Note: This article only aims to explain what Metro UI is about, but does not judge any mobile OS or claim that Metro was inspired by xda-developers, like the title previously said. That was a fault from the author and not intended to be published this way.

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