azrienoch · Oct 13, 2011 at 10:22 pm

First CM7 Touchpad Alpha Released, and More on HP’s GPL Violation

Today is turning out to be a rollercoaster of news for the HP Touchpad.  Shortly after last night’s article on how HP installed Android on every Touchpad in order to load the component manufacturers’ drivers for testing hardware, the Cyanogenmod Touchpad team announced the first public release of their CM7 alpha.  It was over a month ago that the CM Touchpad team posted footage of Android’s first boot on the Touchpad.  The result came at a price of hundreds of hours of volunteered time and tireless effort on the part of the CM developers, and we have nothing but gratitude for everything they did.

As the very first public build, the laundry list of bugs and non-working features is so long, it actually does include your socks.  If you choose to try it out, be extremely careful to read and fully understand every last word of their disclaimer, Q&A, and instructions in the mirrored thread from RootzWiki.

Next in the lineup of today’s Touchpad news, a fourth Touchpad bearing Android 2.2 turned up today.  There were previously only three known devices.  One was bought at a Best Buy in Texas, one was bought at a Best Buy in Oklahoma, and the third was bought at a Wal-Mart in New Hampshire.  Not much is known about this fourth device.  What we know is that it was purchased in Germany, and not just a Touchpad running the CM7 alpha, dressed to look like the others.  First, we see the Qualcomm boot animation in the video, just like on the three other Touchpads.  It’s speculated that Qualcomm designed this version of Android, as the manufacturer of the processor on the Touchpad.  The second reason we know this isn’t a fake is it’s running Froyo, whereas CM7–yes, even in it’s early alpha state–is Gingerbread.

Author’s note:  And ain’t that just my luck?  In the middle of writing about it, the video was privated.  Check back here for updates, I’ll post a mirror if I can find it.

Update 14 Oct. 2011:  The video is back up, but unlisted so that only those with a link can view it.  As a precaution, the video is mirrored here.  Also, the owner had this to say:

I bought the touchpad on 22nd of august at a store called Saturn in Munich. It is a major reseller in germany, like best buy. There is a so called “HP PN” number on the receipt and it matches with the one on the touchpad. Then on the package there is a sticker with the “HP PN” and the serial number. Both match with the ones on the touchpad. The receipt has got a signature of the clerk on it.

Last thing to round up all the Touchpad news so far today, trsohmers followed up last night’s article by posting the leaked Cypress Semiconductors drivers for the first time to the public, here on XDA-Developers.  A note from trsohmers:

These drivers CAN NOT BE INSTALLED! These drivers were also NOT used by the Cyanogen Team for porting purposes as by using these drivers, you would not be able to use webOS. I am only posting these drivers as evidence, and for research/educational purposes, and it is in the DEVELOPMENT category as such.

If you have any news tips, please contact me or any Portal News Writer.

 


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azrienoch

azrienoch is an editor on XDA-Developers, the largest community for Android users. View azrienoch's posts and articles here.
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