Pulser_G2 · Oct 12, 2013 at 07:30 pm

From the BBQ: OmniROM

For those of you not able to attend the Big Android BBQ, you may not have heard that a number of developers including XDA Elite Recognized Developers Xplodwild, Chainfire, Dees_Troy announced a new direction in the world of custom ROMs.

Omni is what custom ROMs used to be about: innovation, new features, transparency, community, and freedom. While other ROMs may water down their distributions to ensure they pass Google’s approval, Omni offers you an alternative: an Android distribution that remains compatible, but which doesn’t compromise on your experience. People install custom ROMs because they don’t feel their needs are met by the preinstalled ROM on their device, and Omni is about ensuring your needs are met.

Omni is a chance to get involved, no matter who you are. Developers, whether you’ve been developing apps for a week or ROM features for 3 years, you’re welcome. Users, we know you want to help out, and we know you’re frustrated when you are told, “no bug reports on nightlies.” You want to help out more, and now you can: Omni actively encourages bug reports and feature requests, which can be added to our publicly accessible roadmap. What’s the point in giving you a ROM, and forcing you to not tell us about any bugs you find?

Speaking of nightlies, we also recognize how people use Custom ROMs—we’re all custom ROM users and developers ourselves—the argument that “nightlies are not for end users” is over-used, and no longer valid. We’ve found that the vast majority of users want to get nightly updates to their ROM. For that reason, nightlies aren’t a playground; nightlies are for new features that are finished. You should be able to expect the same stability and reliability from a nightly as you would from a “release” ROM, and can report any bugs that prevent this from happening.

We know not everyone wants to update their ROM daily, and you are free to update as frequently or infrequently as you like. Omni is about flexibility and giving users what they expect, rather than forcing users to use unstable builds in order to run a recent version of Android, then be denied the ability to report bugs, or suggest features, or point out issues, as part of a vibrant and open community, where it’s all free and open-source. No “pro” versions, no nonsense.

If you are interested in finding out more, details will be made available shortly. XDA-TV was there to record the entire talk, and it will be posted shortly. In the meantime, we have opened the Omni forums for any questions, discussions or suggestions. More information will follow very soon with regard to full sources being made available, and how you can get involved and start contributing, as well as a proper roadmap towards getting support on your device.

Update: Sources are now available on github.


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Pulser_G2

Pulser_G2 is an editor on XDA-Developers, the largest community for Android users. Developer Admin at xda-developers, interested in everything in mobile and security. A developer and engineer, who would re-write everything in C or Assembler if the time was there. View Pulser_G2's posts and articles here.
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