egzthunder1 · Aug 16, 2010 at 06:00 pm

General Public License (GPL) for Android Kernels

To the world of Windows Mobile developers, GPL was never an issue since “closed source” operates in a different manner. However, as of lately it has come to the attention of the site that the licensing requirements for open source software are very real and out there. At this point in the article, you may be asking yourself some questions, depending of your level of involvement on the Android development world:

  • Duh! I know everything there is to know about this and it is the reason I share my work.
  • What way is it affecting this site?
  • I thought that since it is Open Source, it didn’t have a license…
  • GP what?

The truth of the matter is that just like with any piece of software, there are licensing requirements to be followed. If at any point during the development, you don’t comply with what is being asked and go your own merry way about finishing the project, you will be in breach of said agreement, and your software becomes illegal.

Let me take a step back and tell you exactly what we are talking about here. Android is composed of several parts, one of which is called Kernel. Without this, Android would simply not exist. Said kernels are developed under a General Public License (GPL), which basically states that the development, changes, and modifications are to be shared among the Linux community for the continuous advancement of the open source community. Any change made to said kernel, if released, forces the person releasing it to share the source, changes, and everything that was done to this kernel. If a ROM is cooked with an kernel whose source is not freely available, the ROM in question is in breach of GPL, and becomes warez (illegal distribution of software) in the eyes of XDA.

The XDA moderator team has done a great job in putting together a thread with resources and information regarding GPL licensing, which is posted across all Android development fora. The following is an excerpt of said thread.

The GPL states that anyone who modifies GPL licenced code is required to make available the sources used to compile it. This is to further improve and encourage collaborative work, as well as to ensure that the best code possible is produced, and to encourage peer-review of all work. This benefits both developers and end users in numerous ways, including:

  • Allowing anyone to verify the code they are trusting with their data, and its authenticity
  • Encouraging community collaboration to produce faster fixes and updates, and better code
  • Helping bring new developments from other devices and fields to your own, letting you benefit from new code that wouldn’t have been available without this sharing.
  • The GPL imparts great freedom for GPL end users. It ensures innovation is never stifled and no project is dependent upon any single developer.

It is in everyone’s interest for the GPL to be adhered to, as it gives us all better ROMs, better transparency, and a better atmosphere for developers to work together to make great code.

If you are interested in knowing more about GPL, please take a look at the GPL threads. Again, this has been posted in all Android development fora across the site. Please help the moderator team keep xda-developers in compliance with regulations, so that our community can flourish hassle-free.


_________
Want something on the XDA Portal? Send us a tip!

egzthunder1

egzthunder1 is an editor on XDA-Developers, the largest community for Android users. I have been an active member of xda-developers since 2005 and have gone through various roles in my time here. I am Former Portal Administrator, and currently part of the administrator team while maintaining my writer status for the portal. In real life, I am a Chemical Engineer turned Realtor in the Miami area. View egzthunder1's posts and articles here.
Brian Young · Aug 2, 2015 at 09:05 pm · 2 comments

Galaxy S6 & Edge get €100 Price Cut—New Models Incoming

Samsung has dropped the price of both the Galaxy S6 and S6 Edge by €100, making the current retail price of these phones €599 and €699, respectively. Though no new prices have been announced stateside, a cut is expected soon. (more…)

XDA NEWS
Mario Tomás Serrafero · Aug 2, 2015 at 11:33 am · 1 comment

Sunday Debate: How Can We Get a No-Compromise Phone?

Join us in a fun Sunday Debate on Compromises. Come with your opinions and feel free to read some of our thoughts, then pick your side or play devil’s advocate to get your voice heard and engage in friendly discussion. You can read our food-for-thought or jump straight into the fray below!     Getting an upgrade is a big deal to us power users: it’s our little Android Christmas, where after a long time (for plenty of us, at least)...

XDA NEWS
Mario Tomás Serrafero · Aug 1, 2015 at 03:54 pm · 3 comments

PSA: You Can Optimize Your Note 4’s Recents Menu & RAM

The Note 4 never had the fastest Recents Menu, and despite its 3GB of RAM, its app-holding capabilities only got worse on Lollipop. The infamous RAM bug that plagued the S6 is indeed an annoyance on the Note 4's 5.0.X ROMs. Rumors of an update to fix all of this were confirmed with the first reports of the 5.1.1 update for the Russian Note 4, which seemingly improved the Recents Menu and RAM management. But it'll be a long time...

XDA NEWS