egzthunder1 · Oct 25, 2010 at 09:00 pm

SD Card Buying Guide

The debate on what SD card is better/compatible has been a non-issue for most newer devices, but there is a huge market worldwide that still rely on these older devices as the latest and greatest is either not their cup of tea or it is simply too far out of reach budget-wise. On top of that, memory card manufacturers have made it unclear enough to confuse many non-technical end users and possibly deceiving them into thinking that they are getting something that will either end up not working or flat out don’t need. With such philosophy in mind, XDA member Chef_Tony has put a guide together in the Blue Angel section to help people choose what they need. You may be wondering, why is this in the Blue Angel area? The answer is very simple. One of the biggest downfalls of the BA (among other old devices) is that they appeared during or before the development of SDHC cards, which means that most high capacity cards (most 4 GB and larger cards with a few exceptions) will not be recognized by quite a few devices, the Blue Angel being one of them. There have been a few fixes for several devices over the years, but only a few devices saw a positive reaction come out of them.

In either case, the guide also goes very well into detail as to what the nomenclature of each card actually means (some with multiplier numbers like CD and others known as “Class II, III” and so on. So, if you ever look at 8 GB cards, one Class 2 and a Class 4 and try to figure out why they differ in price by almost a third, when you read the specs in this guide, you will learn to understand why. As Chef_Tony was not going for advertising bucks, he left brand comparisons out of the picture on this wonderful guide. This way, you will be able to make your decisions based on facts and not based on branding.

While the guide only discusses regular SD cards, this will hold true for all other SD variants (micro and mini), and will also apply for other types of flash memory too (Pro/Duo, CF, etc). Lastly, the guide also will give you tips on how to get the best out of your card and also to avoid any potential security risks you may face upon getting a brand new card (yes, really… with a brand new card).

The guide is not too long but goes straight to the point. It can be found here. A big thanks goes to Chef_Tony for taking the time of putting this together.

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egzthunder1

egzthunder1 is an editor on XDA-Developers, the largest community for Android users. I have been an active member of xda-developers since 2005 and have gone through various roles in my time here. I am Former Portal Administrator, and currently part of the administrator team while maintaining my writer status for the portal. In real life, I am a Chemical Engineer turned Realtor in the Miami area. View egzthunder1's posts and articles here.
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