MIUI for the HP Touchpad

With the recent announcement of webOS’s impending transition to an open source license, some of us may have temporarily forgotten about our favorite little green robot. Rest assured, however, that some does not necessarily mean all.

Thanks to hard work by XDA Senior Member scott951, adventurous TouchPad owners can now experience a taste of MIUI-flavored Gingerbread on their tablets. Unlike previous Android ports to the tablet, which have mainly centered around CyanogenMod and its derivatives, this MIUI infusion results in quite a favorable tablet experience.

 Working:

  • Audio/Sound
  • Wi-Fi
  • Bluetooth
  • Touchscreen
  • Charging
  • All sensors
  • Wired earphone/headphone
  • Gallery
  • YouTube
  • MIUI Backup (don’t backup contacts)
  • Multi-Touch
  • MIUI Themes

Not Working:

  • No On-Screen Menu (working on it)
  • Other Random Bugs

Stability and functionality seems to be excellent for an alpha ROM. As such, this ROM is scheduled to shed its alpha status quite soon.

TouchPad owners wishing to get in on the action should proceed to the ROM thread.

HP TouchPad Firesale Part Deux?

It really was a shame that it was already too late for WebOS when the HP Touchpad came out. It had quality hardware, and has proven that it can survive being poked and prodded by hackers and modders of every skill level. In  many ways, the $99 firesale that happened when HP decided to dump their stock of the TouchPad was the best possible thing for it. Not only did it get the device into  the hands of people who were still unsure about whether or not they wanted a tablet, but also the hands of developers from every walk of life. The end result was an influx of new users and developers that would otherwise not have come in to play. It seemed like the HP Firesale was going to be a one time deal, until a recent note from HP announced they were going to release a whole new batch of the HP Touchpad.

HP caught themselves in a bit of trouble when they announced the original firesale for the TouchPad. They had already ordered a pretty significant volume of parts to build more of their wayward tablet, and tried to cancel those orders. Fortunately for us, that wasn’t an option, so HP was made to purchase and assemble a whole new batch of the TouchPad. Now, they need to do something about all of those shiny new tablets they have just lying around. Starting this Sunday the 11th, the HP ebay Store will have a fresh supply of touchpads for sale.  There’s been no mention of what price point these devices will start at, but I have a feeling we will see that $99 pricetag come back for the base model of the HP TouchPad. Hopefully we will see yet another influx of new users and developers looking to explore their new tablet again.

Bye Bye TouchPads

Well, if you are bashing yourself on the head for not taking advantage of HP’s fire sale of webOS Touchpads and was waiting for a second one, you’re maybe out of luck. According to a tip that we got from XDA member joshman99, the tablet from HP is no longer in production. In fact, HP sent out an e-mail to customers and retailers where it claims that it no longer has stock of this device and that whatever is left in the stores will be the last ones to be sold. Now, there are really no implications for HP on this as they were trying to penetrate the market with a tab carrying an OS, which ranks anywhere between fourth and fifth in terms of overall usage by the consumer base. This actually has got me thinking a bit as for the real reason behind stopping production and other underlying issues behind the Touchpad.

The first thing that came to mind when I read this was that HP was just trying to recover their loses on a product that was badly overpriced from the start. After the success of the “fire sale,” as it was deemed by blogs across the web, it was rumored that HP would launch a second fire sale, which they did but is exclusive to Best Buy in the US and has the limitation that a computer must be purchased as well to get the special discount on the pad. So, based on this move it was definitely not their original intent.

After giving it some thought, I remembered that about a month ago, we found out that HP was breaking GPL by distributing some of these tabs loaded with Android and not sharing the kernel. It was later found out that the pads are tested with Android and apparently, webOS was not installed by QC pre-shipment. It is possible that the pad got into a bad reputation trend and possible legal trouble because of this, and as such, HP decided to pull the plug on this idea altogether.

My final idea (and the one to be most likely, at least in my mind) is that HP analyzed the response on the fire sale and the underlying reasons for the success of the event. While the “oomph for the buck” factor was definitely a major push ($99 for a 16GB tab and $149 for a 32 GB one), I do believe that they had to realize that the bulk of their sales spiked when the possibility of Android running on this became public knowledge. So, thinking back on the project, they had to realize that including Android on the tab would make much more sense (commercially) than shipping with something that most people don’t use/will replace the moment they get it. You also have to remember that, due to flashing, the possibility of warranty exchanges was going to be high and that would definitely eat into the margins after short. Long story short, it is my own opinion that an Android version of this tab will hit the market soon and that is why they are retiring the webOS one.

What are your thoughts on this? Do you think that the HP Tab is completely dead or that it will rise from its ashes in the form of an Android enabled device? Please share your thoughts.

Dear Valued Customer,

Making sure customers have a positive experience when they purchase our products is a priority for us. In some cases, limited inventory makes it challenging to fulfill all customer orders. As you signed up for updates on the HP TouchPad, we wanted you to know that we are officially out of stock. Some retailers will have some stock available, but our online inventory is depleted.

Thank you for your interest in this product and the feedback you provided. Your input plays a critical role in defining our product roadmap and will help us continue to bring innovative products to market.

Sincerely,
HP

You can find more information in the original article.

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Thanks  joshman99 for the tip!

First CM7 Touchpad Alpha Released, and More on HP’s GPL Violation

Today is turning out to be a rollercoaster of news for the HP Touchpad.  Shortly after last night’s article on how HP installed Android on every Touchpad in order to load the component manufacturers’ drivers for testing hardware, the Cyanogenmod Touchpad team announced the first public release of their CM7 alpha.  It was over a month ago that the CM Touchpad team posted footage of Android’s first boot on the Touchpad.  The result came at a price of hundreds of hours of volunteered time and tireless effort on the part of the CM developers, and we have nothing but gratitude for everything they did.

As the very first public build, the laundry list of bugs and non-working features is so long, it actually does include your socks.  If you choose to try it out, be extremely careful to read and fully understand every last word of their disclaimer, Q&A, and instructions in the mirrored thread from RootzWiki.

Next in the lineup of today’s Touchpad news, a fourth Touchpad bearing Android 2.2 turned up today.  There were previously only three known devices.  One was bought at a Best Buy in Texas, one was bought at a Best Buy in Oklahoma, and the third was bought at a Wal-Mart in New Hampshire.  Not much is known about this fourth device.  What we know is that it was purchased in Germany, and not just a Touchpad running the CM7 alpha, dressed to look like the others.  First, we see the Qualcomm boot animation in the video, just like on the three other Touchpads.  It’s speculated that Qualcomm designed this version of Android, as the manufacturer of the processor on the Touchpad.  The second reason we know this isn’t a fake is it’s running Froyo, whereas CM7–yes, even in it’s early alpha state–is Gingerbread.

Author’s note:  And ain’t that just my luck?  In the middle of writing about it, the video was privated.  Check back here for updates, I’ll post a mirror if I can find it.

Update 14 Oct. 2011:  The video is back up, but unlisted so that only those with a link can view it.  As a precaution, the video is mirrored here.  Also, the owner had this to say:

I bought the touchpad on 22nd of august at a store called Saturn in Munich. It is a major reseller in germany, like best buy. There is a so called “HP PN” number on the receipt and it matches with the one on the touchpad. Then on the package there is a sticker with the “HP PN” and the serial number. Both match with the ones on the touchpad. The receipt has got a signature of the clerk on it.

Last thing to round up all the Touchpad news so far today, trsohmers followed up last night’s article by posting the leaked Cypress Semiconductors drivers for the first time to the public, here on XDA-Developers.  A note from trsohmers:

These drivers CAN NOT BE INSTALLED! These drivers were also NOT used by the Cyanogen Team for porting purposes as by using these drivers, you would not be able to use webOS. I am only posting these drivers as evidence, and for research/educational purposes, and it is in the DEVELOPMENT category as such.

If you have any news tips, please contact me or any Portal News Writer.

 

Multitouch Enabled for HP Touchpad Sporting 2.3.5

You may remember a little less than a month ago that the HP Touchpad went on a massive sale world wide. It is loaded with WebOS but at a very attractive $99 to $150 a piece, or I should say it was loaded with WebOS. Yesterday, we got a tip from XDA Senior moderator pulser_g2 that not only did TouchDroid team get multitouch working on the pad, which was based on the original incomplete work on a single-touch driver which was developed by jonpry and green– at Cyanogenmod, but also that it was running the latest iteration of Gingerbread… 2.3.5. The port is still being worked on and there is no release out there yet or ETA, but they did post a video of the device running a rather smooth port of the OS. In this video, the team also showed the device being capable of recognizing multiple touch points.. up to 10. Android devices seem to share several hardware components with this pad, so finishing the port should simply be a matter of time once everything is put in place and all the trees that contain useful bits are lumped together.

Again, keep in mind that the port is in initial stages and it has not even been officially released by the team. However, for you lucky owners of this device, you will likely be getting an early Christmas gift.

You can find more information in the original thread.

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Thanks pulser_g2 for the tip!

HP TouchPad Gets In Gear… Both Cores Overclocked to 1.9 GHz

Amazingly enough, the HP Touchpad seems to be among the best selling pads in the mobile world. If you think about it, getting a dual core pad with 16 GB of storage for about US$100 (about 4 times cheaper than the iPad), would definitely be enough incentive to get it even if you don’t need or want it. Because of this move by HP, developers all over the world have their hands on at least one (or are about to), and are all working towards making this device reach its true potential. XDA member amirborna seems to be in this same boat as he has posted a way to overclock the tab’s processors (both of them) to 1.9 GHz. The only caveat is that at such speeds, the device becomes a bit unstable. However, it can still be safely overclocked to 1.7 GHz (on both cores as well) and have 0 issues in the process. According to the dev, the device becomes far more responsive than with stock clock values, more fluid, and best of all, it does not affect the battery due to the small difference in voltage requirements at the higher frequency values.

The guide is very concise and it is rather simple to follow. However, as with every overclocking process, there is always risk involved. Please ensure that you read the whole guide and leave some feedback for the dev.

Overclocking your HP Touchpad

  • Relatively safe to do
  • No noticeable effect on battery (stock usually pulls 550mah and 1.5ghz is pulling like 565mah.
  • Touchpad becomes incredibly fast, fluid, responsive, and is a joy to use
  • No heat created
  • Overclocks both cores
  • Feels like you have next generation hardware after the overclock
  • Smooth like butter

You can find more information in the original thread.

Want something published in the Portal? Contact any News Writer.

Hello TouchPad, Goodbye Steve Jobs [Weekly Recap – 26 August 2011]

This week’s Weekly Recap on XDA TV takes a look at the TouchPad frenzy since HP announced it was shutting down WebOS development. In Android development, rebellos’ unbricking method using your very own bootloader on Hummingbird devices, and punkgeek’s kernel to enable USB tethering on the Samsung Galaxy Tab, make appearances. For Windows News, Azrienoch talks about the interviews developers contributed to tell the history of the HTC HD2. SassiBoB reviews Bully Block by SedGrid, and finally azrienoch tells us why he’s fed up with all the articles lamenting Steve Jobs as CEO of Apple. Click on for the episode! (more…)

Android on HP TouchPad Bounty: Now Over $2,000

XDA has teamed up with HackNMod to pool together resources in an effort to make the bounty for porting Android to the HP TouchPad as large as possible. As a reminder, you can still find TouchPads for sale for a little as $99 (though they’re sold out for a couple of weeks, we’re told). With a dual-core CPU and great hardware, the TouchPad would make a great Android tablet. Click on to HackNMod to see the breakdown of the bounty, and proceed onto our new HP TouchPad forum here on XDA.

Android on the HP TouchPad: Let’s Do It!

You might have heard that HP is no longer supporting webOS devices. Now that the TouchPad is on sale for $100 or less around the internet, there is great interest in porting Android to the tablet. At XDA, we push the limits of our mobile devices, and getting Android ported to the TouchPad would be a great milestone. What’s more, an anonymous XDA user has offered $500 to any team/person that is successful with the port. Let the development begin! Click on to enter the HP TouchPad forum!

Get More Out Of Your Touchpad With Perfect Keyboard For Android

Fed up with your stock Android keypad? Why not try out XDA forum member for.digit‘s Perfect Keyboard for Android.

Perfect Keyboard lets you take command of your Android device’s touchpad keypad, enabling customisation with seven different themes and adding additional functionality to your device.

The app features custom dictionaries, background and text colours as well as the feature of adjusting the keyboard’s vibration density and also speech to text.

Perfect Keyboard is compatible with Android 2.2 and upwards.

The app is available in the Market and XDA members will get a full refund by sending the dev a PM with the transaction number.

For more information, head on over to the application thread.

Say ‘Hello Alexa’ to Amazon Echo – XDA TV

For whatever reason, Amazon appears to be continually trying to disrupt the Android and Google services relationship. They want a piece of that action. From the Kindle tablets to the failed Fire Phone, Amazon is certainly running up against Google. Of course, it could be said that Amazon is an idea company in the same way that Google is. And if their engineers come up with something Jeff Bezo thinks is valuable, they will try it in the market. The latest buzzing item from Amazon is the Echo.

In this video XDA TV Producer TK reviews Amazon Echo. This digital personal assistant, named Alexa, is stationary, unlike its competitors Google Now, Cortana, and Siri. TK shows off the device, its uses, functionality, and talks about his thoughts of the Echo. Check out this video.

(more…)

Google Adds Android Apps Support to Chrome OS

Some time ago, Google decided to give up on Android and focus on Chrome OS as the main operating system for more traditional computing form factors. Since that time, we’ve seen Chrome OS ship on Chromebooks, Chromeboxes, and the like. It seems that the engineers at Google changed their minds and decided to Androidify their second operating system by allowing it to run Android apps.

This shouldn’t come as too much of a surprise, as Google first mentioned this possibility back at Google I/O in late June. Now, Google has made good on that concept by launching an app called App Runtime for Chrome, which currently is at the beta stage. Google didn’t decide to pack the full Play Store into every Chromebook. Their strategy is to manually bring certain applications into Chrom eOS world through Chrome Web Store.

As for now, the list of applications isn’t too long. Here’s the full set of apps:

Duolingo – a fun and free way to learn a new language before your next trip

Evernote – write, collect and find what matters to you, with a full-size keyboard and touchscreen

Sight Words – a delightful way for you to help improve your child’s reading skills

Vine – create short, beautiful, looping videos in a simple and fun way

The folks at Ars Technica managed to get some details from Google’s spokesperson about the technical side of the project.

The app code is all running on top of the Chrome platform, specifically inside of Native Client. In this way the ARC (Android Runtime for Chrome) apps run in the same environment as other apps you can download from the Chrome Web Store, even though they are written on top of standard Android APIs. The developers do not need to port or modify their code, though they often choose to improve it to work well with the Chromebook form factor (keyboard, touchpad, optional touchscreen, etc).

No porting is required to make these applications work. This gives us the assumption that Google put its efforts to build a virtual machine that runs Android apps and now we are seeing fruits of their hard work. It leads us to another question, though: Is Google planning to dump Chrome OS and replace it with Android–or perhaps merge the two into a single platform? For now, only time will tell.

LuneOS Goes Official and Brings webOS to Android Devices

webOS has had rather turbulent history. Initially developed by Palm, the Linux kernel-based operating system has never found had an easy time making its way to mobile devices. However, and what may come as a surprise to many reading this, development work on the platform is still well underway. There are even working ports for some of popular devices like the Google Nexus 4, Nexus 7 (2012), Samsung Galaxy Nexus, and the long since forgotten HP Touchpad.

The project for mobile devices was renamed LuneOS. And like its predecessor, LuneOS remained open-source. As of now, not many things are working like they should, but the team standing behind the OS put lots of efforts to eliminate the current flaws. A major part of the system has been rewritten from scratch to work properly atop the Android ecosystem. Currently, only WiFi connectivity is working, but developers want to utilize features such as telephony, graphics drivers, and hardware acceleration from Android in the future.

The project’s developers have provided some porting instructions. So with a bit of knowledge, you can make LuneOS work passably on your device. As you can see on the photo to your right, the OnePlus One is one of the devices that might be officially supported in the foreseeable future.

Meanwhile, you can get the installation instructions and compiled binaries from the LuneOS project’s website. Open-source projects are truly great and show that there’s worth in nearly every OS offering when there’s a developer friendly ecosystem.

[via Engadget]