Device Review: Mad Catz M.O.J.O.

MoJoRecently, Google has been acquiring various companies to possibly expand the reach of the Android platform beyond just mobile devices and tablets. With the announcement of Android Wear, Google is creating a standard for wearables like smartwatches. And perhaps with less fanfare, Google is expanding into set-top gaming Android with their purchase of Green Throttle Games. However, don’t think that Google is blazing the trail in these areas! They are just widening the road. Smartwatches like the Samsung Galaxy Gear and the Omate Truesmart were among the pioneers in that arena. Similarly, the OUYA and Nvidia Shield wielded their machetes to slice a path through the Android Gaming forest.

While the OUYA is an Android Gaming device mostly in spirit due to it having its own customized overlay and its own proprietary store, the Nvidia Shield was perhaps the device with the biggest impact in creating this market. But now, there is another device available for you to choose from: the Mad Catz M.O.J.O. It comes in at $199 and gives you access to the Google Play Store. Recently, it was announced that OUYA would make its “experience” available on other hardware, and the M.O.J.O. was announced to be one of the first supported devices.

I was lucky enough to get my hands on one to test it out, as was XDA Developer TV Producer Jordan. To see my thoughts on the device keep reading, and check out the video below to see Jordan’s take.

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JynxBox HD Network Media Streamer Unboxing the XDA Way – XDA Developer TV

Not a long, long time ago and not in a galaxy far away—in this galaxy, in fact—Android only ran on smartphones. That’s not the case anymore; it runs on tablets, Raspberry Pis, televisions, and more. Today XDA Elite Recognized Developer AdamOutler gets his hands on a Jynxbox Android HD Network Media Streamer. What does AdamOutler do when he gets a device? He tears it down to its basic elements; he does an Unboxing the XDA Way.

After tearing it down and giving a tour of the device’s components, AdamOuter demonstrates the device setup, entering recovery, and rooting the device. The device can be rooted easily, perhaps too easily, so Adam shows you, how you can apply security. Finally, he demonstrates how to set the JynxBox up for debugging and loading software to it.

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We Want You to Join XDA Developer TV’s Line Up – XDA Developer TV

XDA Developer TV is looking to add more talented people like you to the lineup. If this sounds like something you’d like to try, do not hesitate. All it takes is basic video skills, which we can help you learn, a camera capable of at least 720p resolution, and a love and knowledge of mobile devices—both Android and Windows Phone.

What do you get? You get the enjoyment of spreading the knowledge you’ve learned on XDA to thousands of people. You will get to join the ranks of other XDA Developer TV stars like Jordan, azrienoch, Adam, and others. So what are you waiting for? Contact Jimmy McGee with any questions. If you are camera shy, but still want to join our team, contact Portal Administrator Will Verduzco to learn how to join our group of talented writers.

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Samsung Rugby Pro Gets Official TWRP, Rugby Smart Gets CM9, CM10

Even the less popular devices need some lovin’ too. The Samsung Rugby Pro and Samsung Rugby Smart aren’t the most well known smartphones on XDA. However, that hasn’t prevented developers from hacking then and releasing some good stuff. Now, the Rugby Pro has official TWRP, and the Rugby Smart has CM9 and CM10 ports.

XDA Senior Member kemonine96, who has done much work with XBMC, has released various treats for the two devices. The most recent offerings are TWRP for the Rugby Pro, and CM9 and CM10 for the Rugby Smart.

For the Rugby Pro, it’s been accepted by Team Win as an officially supported TWRP device. That’s pretty good news for a lesser known device. With TWRP, users can flash whatever they want in style. For more info, check out the Rugby Pro thread.

The CM9 and CM10 ROMs are both still in their alpha stages, but have a surprisingly small number of things wrong with them. Currently, CM9 has the following issues:

Untested
Device encryption

Current issues
Display auto-brightness toggle — Is not possible, the Rugby Smart lacks a light sensor
2G data only toggle does nothing
No device serial number shown — prop:ril.serialnumber

And for CM10, the issues are as follows:

Untested
Camera Panorama
Tethering (BT/USB/WiFi)

Current issues
SD Card swap (CM10 Limitation)
Orientation sensor

So while there are issues, all of the biggest features like camera, Bluetooth, and WiFi actually work. So these could be used as daily drivers. Both ROMs are being actively worked on, so issues will be fixed in future releases.

For more details, check out the CM9 thread and CM10 thread.

Android 4.2 on Xoom, Raspberry Pi Web Hosting, XDA Swag! – XDA Developer TV

Android 4.2 for the Motorola Xoom, and more this weekend at XDA. Our friend Jordan takes the time to round up these important stories and serve them up to us in bite-size pieces. First, he talks about the Galaxy Note II‘s multi-window functionality being ported to the Galaxy S II. In other, news you can now pre-order XDA gear!

In CyanogenMod 10 news, Jordan talks about the unofficial release for the Droid RAZR M. Also, Jordan mentions the HTC G2 / Desire Z getting a CyanogenMod 10.1 build as well. Finally, the Xperia Arc and Arc S get unofficial CyanogenMod 10 releases. Pull up a chair and check out this video.

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Learn How to Host a Website with a Raspberry Pi

The Raspberry Pi is not only one of the most unique devices on XDA, but it is also among the most popular with developers. So far, we’ve brought you news of Raspberry Pi getting ICS, ADB support, and a supercomputer was built out of a bunch of them and Legos. It’s even made our Best “Other” device of the year. There is so much you can do with the little thing. Now, you can host websites as well.

XDA Senior Member marty331 wrote a tutorial on how to host a website on the Raspberry Pi. The list of required software and hardware is quite long, but the process itself is pretty simple. To get started, you’ll need:

Hardware:
Raspberry Pi
USB power cable
Ethernet cable and modem to connect to
HDMI cable (temporary need)
Monitor (temporary need)
USB mouse/keyboard (temporary need)
Standard SD card
SD card reader on your computer

Software:
Raspbian image – Debian based OS for Raspberry Pi
Lighttpd – lightweight webserver that is extremely easy to set up
PageKite – makes local websites or SSH servers publicly accessible in mere seconds, and works with any computer and any Internet connection.

Once you have acquired all of that, it’s simply a matter of following the tutorial step-by-step. You’ll run through downloading and installing some packages, such as lighttpd and giving your Raspberry Pi a static IP address. From there, it’s just a few more steps, and you have a website hosted on your Pi. While useful in its own right, this just adds yet another useful tool to the Raspberry Pi arsenal.

For more details, check out the original thread.

Holiday Guide 2012: Best “Other” Device of the Year

Android’s original allure was that it could be put on all sorts of devices, not just smartphones. However, this has only recently started to become a reality. This year alone, we’ve seen devices like the Nexus Q, Raspberry Pi, Ouya, and more. Never have we seen such computing possibilities in such a range of small devices. So here we present our choice for the Best “Other” Device of the Year.

Raspberry Pi

This credit card-sized computer may not seem like much, but at 3.37 in x 2.13 in x .60 in, the little Raspberry Pi packs almost limitless possibilities. For instance, XDA Elite Recognized Developer AdamOutler used one as the foundation for his CASUAL rooting system on the “root any Android” box, and XBMC has been ported to the Pi for use as a diminutive HTPC. Recently, developers from the community achieved ADB compatibility.

This sort of device can give kids of all ages the entry point into a career in programming, using the included MIT Media Lab’s “Scratch” programming language for kids. The device can also be used as a cheap alternative to a desktop computer for browsing the Internet and sending Email. And for those who want to load Android, ICS is being ported to the Pi. Oh and did we mention that it’s only $35? Go ahead and get one for yourself this Holiday season.

 

 

 

Access our entire Holiday Guide 2012 by clicking the links below!

Noozy Audio Player Brings Unique Sound

There are a plethora of music applications for Android. Some of them are basic music players and others have various extra features. None of them have Google Music support. However, each music player seems to have its own loyal following—especially VLC and XBMC. There’s a new audio player making its way around that brings along its own brand of sound.

The app is called Noozy Audio Player. It was posted to XDA by Forum Member skeletonboy and it packs a lot of interesting features. For the most part, it looks like an application you’d see on a Windows Phone 7 device, given its Metro-esque look. It also features a proprietary audio processing feature called Noozxoide that is supposed to make your music sound better. Here’s further explanation:

Noozxoide Balanced X-EQ™ Processor
(Deliver balanced soundstage for each channels on the content.)

Noozxoide MaxxBass™ Processor
(Delivers the premium deeper 1 octave bassline.)

Noozxoide NogicQ™ Processor
(Delivers higher vocal definition and warm audio.)

Noozoxide Psychoacoustic II™ Processor
(Increase the speaker size and added warm attack effect on the content.)

Noozxoide LogicSurround ES™ Processor
(Create virtual surround sound for headphone or practical speakers and widen the soundstage.)

If you intend to use the application, it is recommended that you not use any 3rd party equalizers. Also, if you use Voodoo Sound, make sure to disable Noozxoide. If you’d like to give it a try, check out the application thread.

App Review: Toggle in Your Notification Bar with Notification Toggle – XDA Developer TV

Do you have too many toggle widgets on your home screen? Would you like to toggle the on/off state of your Wi-Fi or other toggles on your notification bar? Well XDA Recognized Developer j4velin has provided us with a great application that brings this feature.

In this video TK reviews the Notification Toggle application. He shows the options of the application and shows how the application looks. TK steps you through all the setup screens of Notification Toggle. So check out this app review.

 

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XDA Elite Recognized Developer Question and Answer Session (Q&A) – XDA Developer TV

When you are as awesome and knowledgeable as XDA Elite Recognized Developer and XDA Developer TV Producer AdamOutler people inevitably want to pick your brain. AdamOutler has been receiving questions from various sources, email, private messages, YouTube comments, and we assume even smoke signals. Today, he takes time out of his daily duties of hacking, developing, and just being awesome to answer some of your burning questions. So take some time and check out the answers given in this video.

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Want to Learn? Choose Your Tutorial

Here at XDA we promote information sharing and development. Another thing we encourage is learning how to develop. With currently running XDA TV segments for building your own Android app and awesome tips for using your Android device, we’ve been working at accomplishing this However, many still learn best through written tutorials. There are tutorials out there to help users with practically everything from theming and scripting, all the way to ROM development and compiling. One big issue, though, is finding those tutorials.

XDA Senior Member F3niX has done a lot of work in that regard by posting more than a dozen tutorial links in a single thread. This can be incredibly helpful as a quick reference for users looking to learn something new. It’s much like the table of contents of a book, except with web links.

The tutorials listed range from pretty basic to advanced-intermediate topics. They include:

MIUI v4
Sense UI
Making a Flashable Zip
Making a CWM Flashable Zip
Complete Android ROM development and essential tutorials
Re-Odexing a ROM
Porting AOSP ICS ROMs
Compiling CM9 on Mac-OSX Lion
MIUI (Source GB)
Create your own De-Bloat Tool
Porting LewaOS,JoyOS for Noobs
[*]Making your Own Custom ROM
Basic Modding and Theming:
Remap Hardware Button to ICS Recent Apps
Create GB Dictionary for your Language
ICS Recent Apps Button/Softkeys to Status Bar
Re-Odexing a ROM

While the hardest stuff may not be presented, this is an outstanding list for beginners looking to get started, or even intermediate users looking to expand their knowledge. Of course, all credit goes to the original writers of the guides. It should also be noted that while this is posted in the Samsung Galaxy R forums, most of the links take you to universal tutorials.

For the list and discussion, head to the original thread.

Pro Tip Number 6: Effective Use of NFC Tags – XDA TV

In the sixth in a series of XDA Pro Tips, XDA Elite Recognized Developer AdamOutler demonstrates the use of NFC (Near-Field Communication) tags. AdamOutler begins by showing how to used the Tag ID to trigger a scripted event using an Android Application. Next, AdamOutler shows data being written and retrieved to and from a tag. Finally, AdamOutler discusses the NFC technology briefly. So sit back, relax, and check out the video.

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Pro Tip Number 5: Why You Should Odex and Deodex – XDA TV

In the fifth in a series of XDA Pro Tips, XDA Elite Recognized Developer AdamOutler responds to your requests for this Pro Tip. AdamOutler talks about Odexing and Deodexing ROMs.

There is no universal and free way to odex and deodex a ROM for all platforms, as different platforms and devices have different tools for odexing and deodexing. So, AdamOutler lays out why you would want to deodex, odex, and what it all means. So sit back, relax and check out the video.

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