• 5,814,993
    REGISTERED
  • 41,838
    ONLINE NOW

Posts Tagged: Samsung

Jordan

Returning for another Quick Take of This Week in Development, Jordan gives a run down on several stories of interest from the XDA Portal. Jordan talks about Samsung working towards their hard brick fix. And in some unfortunate news, Jordan talks about the HTC One X hardware issues.

In other news Jordan talks about AntiSpy Mobile, and how floating apps should be easier to create because StandOut released their libraries to developers. Jordan also mentions our most recent Pro Tip video on XDA TV.

READ ON »

Jordan Rant

Join us as our friend Jordan returns for another episode of This Week in Development. Jordan begins by covering all the tutorials available on XDA, from Beginning Android ROM Development to porting LewaOS and JoyOS to your phone.

Jordan then talks about the AT&T HTC One X bootloader unlock, S Voice fix, and Samsung Note international source code release. Jordan covers XDA Elite Recognized Developer Chainfire‘s Windows Mobile 6 market hack and XDA Portal Administrator Will Verduzco’s how to root the how to root the Meizu MX video. Finally, Jordan strongly discusses his views on all the copyright and patent wars in the mobile world. Check it out!

READ ON »

Advertisment
Capture

In today’s Quick Take of This Week in Development, Jordan covers all the noteworthy articles from the XDA Portal. As Jordan discusses, the most important articles were about the Samsung Galaxy S III. This weekend the Galaxy S III was rooted, official stock firmware was leaked, Samsung S Voice was ripped, and the first custom ROM was released. In related news, the older Samsung Galaxy S II and Note have a serious bug that could brick your device.

Jordan then talks about CM9 Alpha arriving for the Droid X2. Finally, Jordan mentions our new Pro Tip series on XDA TV. All said, this is another video you don’t want to miss!

READ ON »

Jordan 6

This week on the XDA Portal, we saw many important stories. To give a run down of these stories, XDA TV Producer Jordan returns with another episode of This Week in Development.

Jordan mentions the Apple versus HTC patent wars and court battles. In more big, rich companies versus other rich companies news, Jordan updates us on the Oracle versus Google trial. In more Google news, the limit on device deauthorization on Google Music is discussed. The lamentable actions by Motorola and the locking down of their devices is mentioned. Finally, Jordan urges you to go check out  XDA Elite Recognized Developer AdamOutler’s Galaxy Nexus tear down and unboxing.
READ ON »

Untitled-1

Here at XDA-Developers, development isn’t just something we do, its what we do.  Samsung recognizes this, and would like for us to draw your attention to the Smart App Developer Challenge 2012, which will be helping sponsor XDA TV for the next couple of months.

The challenge is looking for app developers to create new and innovative applications for the Samsung Galaxy Tab and the Galaxy Note and upload them to Samsung Apps. Samsung will then award 80 lucky winners with a combined $4.08 million. The contest is split up into two categories Super Apps and S Pen Apps, with 60 and 20 winners respectively. The S Pen category is looking for apps that are built using the S Pen SDK, and the Super Apps category is further split into game and non-game apps, each with 30 winners. In other words, the top 20 S Pen Apps, top 30 Games, and top 30 Non-Game Apps will be selected as winners.

The contest is accepting application entries from now until September 30, and winners will be selected based on sheer download numbers during that time period. It is thus in your best interest to enter as soon as possible in order to rack up as many downloads as you can. Winners will be announced on October 31, and will be broken down as follows:

Head over to the the official site to get started.

 

 

Jordan3

In this episode of This Week in Development, Jordan the highlights from this week’s XDA Portal articles. Jordan spends a lot of time talking about the new Samsung Galaxy S III, from the Samsung Unpacked 2012 announcement, to XDA Elite Recognized Developer AdamOutler‘s Hacker’s Overview of the Galaxy S III processor and the new Galaxy S III forum being added. Also, Jordan covers the CM9 release for the Galaxy Note, and the HD2 getting Ice Cream Sandwich Hardware Acceleration. Jordan mentioned the article detailing the ability to remove Facebook Messenger and Facebook Camera from the App Drawer. Finally, Jordan mentioned XDA TV’s AdamOutler’s Part 2 of How to Build an Android App and his article on Android Programming.

READ ON »

Jordan2 (480x320)

In This Week in Development, our friend Jordan is back to give you a quick run down of all the stories you need to know from this week’s XDA Portal articles. Jordan covers many different device freedom stories from, most HTC devices getting S-Off, as well as most HTC bootloaders being unlockable.

HTC is not the only OEM being freed for development; Jordan talks about the Samsung Galaxy Nexus getting a permanent SIM unlock. Also covered are the Phone Mods Section of The Galaxy Nexus toolkit being released and app editing software Virtuous Ten Studio going into public beta. Finally, Jordan covers the “Perfect” phone article by XDA Elite Recognized Developer AdamOutler, and SuperCID for the Amaze 4G and Rezound.

Check out the video below.

READ ON »

Root

Rooting is the lifeblood of XDA. As such, obtaining root on a device is usually a prime candidate for recognition. This is with good reason, as root access allows users to flash ROMs, kernels, mods, and so on. What then do you say about a root method that has over two dozen supported devices? One word: Awesome. XDA Forum Member StoneBoyTony originally created a root method for the Samsung Galaxy Mini running Gingerbread, but the root method is also compatible with a very large number of other Samsung devices.

Rooting using this method is simple. Download the update.zip file, place it on the root of your SD card, boot into stock Android recovery, and install the update.zip. Really easy. There’s no ADB or script usage required from your computer. What is especially nice about this root method is that StoneBoyTony has put up how to do it for most of the phones on the list. Additionally, StoneBoyTony also provides an unroot update.zip that’s installed the exact same way as the update.zip.

Need more? Okay! The root method is compatible with these phones from Gingerbread version 2.3.3 to 2.3.7, so if you get an OTA for a newer version of Gingerbread, simply flash the unroot update.zip, install the OTA, and then simply re-install the rooted update.zip. No more worrying if the new OTA will break root. Unless it’s ICS, that is; but for many of these phones, that is a pipe dream.

Update: The developer has requested to have his work taken off of the forums. We apologize for any inconvenience.

618px-Over_9000_Vector_by_Vernacular

Heimdall Suite, an Open-Source Cross-Platform set of tools designed to flash firmware to Samsung devices, has received an incremental update to version 1.3.2. This latest update supports Galaxy S II GT-I9100, Galaxy PlayerCaptivate, Vibrant, Fascinate, Mesmerize, Epic 4G, Galaxy S 4G, Infuse 4G, GT-I9000T, Galaxy Tab (7 and 10.1 inches) and of course the Galaxy S GT-i9000.  If your Samsung device is not listed here, testing is required.

Heimdall has always been a favorite among kernel developers and those who frequently flash the latest kernels because no flashable update.zip or Odin packaging is required.   A Heimdall user can simply put their device into Download Mode, and click a button to flash a new zImage directly. XDA Recognized Developer Benjamin Dobell‘s  latest release improves compatibility with Loke (the flash receiver on the device) and expands comparability to several new devices.

In the words of the developer:

Version 1.3.2 addresses some compatibility issues with several devices i.e. the Galaxy Player 5.0 and Galaxy S II. In particular the “Failed to confirm end of file transfer sequence!” error should no longer occur under regular use. This was fixed by mapping a previously unknown protocol parameter, which I’ve now called “chip identifier”, to information in a device’s PIT file. A big thanks goes out to XDA developers user ambrice, who helped identify the cause of the issue.

Head on over to the original thread , get the source code , and check out the official product page.

 

Screenshot at 2012-03-27 16:05:52

A few days ago some users of certain Samsung Galaxy devices began to notice that within the pending updates in the Play Store (that name still feels wrong), was a strange app that they had not installed and the description of which was entirely in Russian. The application was entitled МТС Мобильная Почта, and has since been removed. What’s more, users were unable to actually find this app on their device to uninstall it. Understandably those affected were somewhat concerned about this, fearing that they had fallen victim to some kind of malware. Thankfully it wasn’t, and the MTC application itself is nothing more than an E Mail client for Russia’s Mobile Telecom Systems published by the developers OJSC.

Shortly after the issue was reported, it was discovered that uninstalling certain Samsung specific apps would prevent this MTC application from being listed under “My Apps” or the pending updates.

As identified by the nice folks at The Verge, it turns out that the E Mail application included in stock Samsung firmwares was given the “unique” application name com.seven.Z7—the same unique name as the MTC app. Apparently Seven, who used to develop E Mail services for WinMo but now offer their applications as white labels to third parties, made the mistake of giving the two applications the same name and certificate, thereby confusing the Play Store. Obviously the Samsung Mail client was not listed on Google Play, whereas the MTC app was. This caused many users to see this fictitious update for an app they did not have installed.

Anyone who was affected by this issue should already have seen it resolve itself thanks to action taken by Google, however if for any reason you are still seeing this app then the simplest solution seems to be simply clearing the Google Play’s cache and/or data. There is no longer any need to remove your Samsung specific applications, as the root of the issue is now resolved.

This does of course bring to light a possible hole in the security of the Play Store. Although this has happened before, it was not on such a large or widely reported scale. I would certainly imagine that Google will be looking to make some adjustments and make sure that this kind of error is no longer possible. Although reproducing it with malicious intent would not be easy, as the same unique app identifier and matching certificate would be required. And to be fair to Google, considering that the Samsung Mail client was not actually listed on the Play Store, technically there was no duplication of the unique ID that they could have been aware of. It still seems that there’s room for improvement here though, as Google’s rather lax policy of app screening has repeatedly come under close scrutiny. While they are not at fault here, that wouldn’t really matter if this were a malicious app rather than a simple mix up.

Rapid Charger

Hardware mods can be tricky business. Modifying software is one thing, because if it messes up you can always restore that back up that all our rooted readers should have by now. Then it’s back to normal to try something different another day. With hardware mods, though, there’s a much bigger risk because if you mess up it is the end of the line for whatever you’re hardware modding. So, with that in mind, be careful when doing hardware mods because if it gets messed up, that’s the end of the road.

Depressing consequences aside, XDA Recognized Developer TRusselo has posted a way to modify cheap aftermarket rapid AC chargers to perform like OEM Samsung AC chargers do. This would provide users with the full charging capacity of the Samsung branded AC chargers at a cheaper price.

The modification is pretty self explanatory and involves simply bending and connecting a few pins within the charger itself to fool the Samsung Android phone into believing it’s using a real Samsung charger. As TRusselo explains:

The theory behind it is with samsung galaxy phones and “official chargers”:
if the middle 2 data pins on the usb, while getting 5v to the outer 2 pins it tells the phone that it is an *official samsung* charger and enables full speed charging.

without the middle 2 pins connected (with or without data flow) will not charge at full speed. even if you supply 800mA it will only charge around 350mA.

This mod fixes that 350mA problem and charges the phone at the full capacity it supports. It is highly recommended that you not try this if it’s your only charger, as breaking it will leave you charging via USB and nobody likes to charge via USB.

For anyone who’s interesting in turning their chargers into Samsung chargers, check out the modification thread for photos of how it works and a complete explanation on how and why it works. Additionally, for those carrying the Samsung Galaxy Nexus, check out your local kernel devs to see if they’ve implemented the force AC charge kernel mod for theoretically similar, but without the hardware modification.

fc14

Samsung Epic 4G Touch owners, begin celebrating! XDA Senior Member Calkulin has posted the leaked FC14 4.0.3 firmware, stock and rooted with busybox installed, along with a de-odexed version and the FC14 modem.

The developer warns that users installing the update must flash both the firmware file and the FC14 modem in the same ClockworkMod recovery session because after installation and rebooting you will no longer have CWM recovery. The developer also notes that a factory reset and data wipe is recommended, and he has included a flashable zip that will guarantee all partitions are formatted properly.

Shortly after Calkulin‘s original post, XDA Senior Member qbking77 posted two youtube videos regarding the update—an installation guide and a review of the update. If that sounds like something you’d like to take advantage of, you can check them out here.

All the downloads and information can be found in the original post here. Best of luck to those who attempt to install it!

Samsung Galaxy S II

Sometimes bad things happen and you don’t even know it. Flashing modules can wreck your WiFi, kernels can bork your camera and, and flashing some ROMs can mess with your EFS folder—and thus your IMEI—on Samsung devices including the popular Galaxy S II I9100.

XDA Forum Member vaskodogamagmail has posted about a method that may help users restore their IMEI if the all-important EFS folder is modified by accident. In a nut shell, restoring your backed up IMEI involves deleting the corrupted EFS folder, creating a new one, and doing a few file modifications with a root-enabled file explorer. In the words of the developer:

so I researched. searched all the forums and didn’t find anything that could cure my phone’s IMEI and set it to the original IMEI number. so I experimented and after some hours, I fixed my IMEI.
one thing that led me to the conclusion that ” .nv_data ” file is the thing that I need to fix the IMEI is that they share a very look alike name, and they have the same 2MB size.

While the guide was written with the Galaxy S II in mind, the method should work on all Samsung devices with EFS folders. Those looking to restore their IMEI should visit the original thread for additional information and the full method. Just be sure to back up your device, including the contents of your EFS folder, before getting started.

Advertisement

XDA TV: Most Recent Video

Buy/Sell on Swappa

  • Nexus 5 (Unlocked) buy | sell
  • Galaxy Note 3 (T-Mobile) buy | sell
  • HTC One M7 (Verizon) buy | sell
  • Galaxy S 5 (Unlocked) buy | sell
  • Nexus 7 2013 buy | sell
  • Swappa is the official marketplace of XDA