• 5,815,232
    REGISTERED
  • 39,067
    ONLINE NOW

Posts Tagged: ADB

6a00d83451c9ec69e20154330c7650970c-pi

ADB is the most basic and in many circumstances, one of the most powerful Android debugging tools available. With ADB, one can easily install an app, flash your favorite ROM, or grab a logcat to help developers. ADB has one major disadvantage to newcomers, though, and that’s command line.

Command line is great for scripting, and practically every advanced user becomes or already is quite comfortable, but not everyone can remember various lengthy commands. Luckily, XDA Senior Member Mohamed Hashem created a tool for newcomers and people who like simplicity.

With Mohamed Hashem’s tool, you can pull a logcat, install or uninstall applications, reboot your device to a selected mode, and more. It can also flash a recovery, kernel, or ROM using fastboot. The fact that it’s written in Java makes it multi-platform, and as such, it can be used on Windows, Linux, and OS X. Mahmed Hashem’s tool is a great way to show the true potential of ADB to new users who don’t know much about ADB, fastboot, and command line in general.

If you are new to Android or simply want to have things automated, make your way to the original thread to give this tool a try.

08053fa53f1336fdd7e90db13247500a

Android Debug Bridge (ADB) is very powerful tool, and Android power user is well aware of this. This tool allows users to accomplish many tasks, such as sideloading your favorite ROM or kernel, finding out what’s wrong with an app, or simply stopping or starting a service. As you can see, it can be used to almost everything Android related.

Operations performed on processes are difficult because you need to know the exact name of the package and command to kill it. But with a tool by XDA Forum Member Kingston1, you may now put those concerns aside. As its name suggests, ADB Task Manager is a graphical task manager that you run on your Windows PC. It uses ADB to kill processes on your phone. This task manager can easily be used to kill annoying applications causing instability or other issues. You can also use it for debugging purposes, such as restarting SystemUI.apk without rebooting your device.

This tool requires Windows and .NET Framework 2.0 to run, and your device must be rooted in order to kill all applications. If you are a Windows user and want to play with your Android processes remotely from your PC, head over to the utility thread and give this tool a try.

Advertisment
android-cmd

Android and ADB are perfect companions. Of course you can use Android without using this debug tool, but most will end up going back to it when a problem arises with your favorite custom ROM or application. Many of you might scared by the number of commands and overall geekness of ADB. But fear not, as there is a tool that will make you forget about all those pesky console commands.

ADB can be served in a graphically friendly form. A perfect example was developed by XDA Forum Member Fusseldieb, who created a Windows application to communicate with a phone using the ADB protocol. With Super ADB Tool, you can perform simple tasks like uploading or downloading a file, rebooting to recovery or bootloader, and even taking a logcat or sideloading a file. There’s a very long list of features, which will surely be expanded upon in the future.

The application should work with any Windows computer that has .NET Framework 3.5 installed, and you can find out more along with the app’s official changelog in the original thread.

adb

ADB and Fastboot are invaluable tools for almost every Android user. Without them, flashing a kernel or system image would be much more difficult or even impossible. If you are an experienced user, you can download the Android SDK, click few times, add ADB and Fastboot to $PATH and happily torture your device with latest ROMs and kernels without worry that one small mistake will result as a plastic brick.

If you are a Linux, ChromeOS, or Mac user, you may find a tool made by XDA Forum Member corbin052198 very useful. The Nexus Tools script automatically detects your OS, and then downloads and configures almost everything you need to use ADB on your machine. The only missing thing is a udev list, which makes the device “visible” for debugging, but this can be easily fixed by visiting this thread.

The script runs as root, so don’t be surprised when it asks for sudo and copies all necessary files to usr/bin, which makes them available system-wide. ChromeOS support is experimental and may not work as intended, so please keep that in mind.

If you are planning to set up your PC to work with Android devices, Nexus Tools is a perfect choice. All you need to do is visit the original thread to give it a go.

6G2Yq

Recently, we’ve talked a good deal about ADB and getting it set up on various operating systems. ADB is a very handful set of tools that allows you to install your favorite apps directly from your PC or even work with your /system partition by pushing or pulling some files. ADB is also a great tool to get error logs and debug Android applications.

If you’ve used ADB more than once, you likely noticed that pushing files is far from convenient. Typing long commands and paths is not the easiest way, especially when your path resets after accessing ADB shell. Because of this, XDA Senior Member youssef badr created a useful Windows-only tool that helps you push files really easily.

All you need to do is to specify which file needs to be pushed and the path on your device. The script takes care of the rest. You can keep your device in shell state to see the full file structure. Obviously, you need to have working ADB and associated drivers on your PC to use this tool.

More information and the tool itself can be found in the original thread.

bart-simpson-generator

We’ve talked about ADB and its importance on many occasions. This set of tools allows you to push or pull the files, as well as generate logs that help you properly debug applications, frameworks, and other elements of Android. It’s quite easy to set up ADB on Linux machines, as you just need to type one or two commands and you’re done. You can also use one of tools to do the job for you. On Windows, the situation is a bit different.

It’s not a mystery that newest editions of Windows have problems with ADB drivers. One of the solution is to find an universal driver to fix all the issues. We already wrote about great project by XDA Senior Member 1wayjonny that puts all the drivers together to save you time and reduce your chances of encountering issues. Now, the project has been updated to support the newest devices such as the Google Nexus 5 and the Nvidia Shield.

Installation is pretty easy. On Windows 7 and earlier, all you need to do is plug in your device and choose the folder with the universal driver. It’s a bit more complicated on Windows 8 and 8.1, as you need to disable Driver Signature Enforcement. But with just a little bit of effort, you’ll be able to use ADB on your device in no time. 1wayjonny was kind enough to explain the procedure thoroughly, so anyone can follow along easily.

This tool should work with most devices, but only a few are officially supported. You can get the driver from the original thread.

2686-5-2013-02-01706266

Android Debug Bridge (ADB) is the most important and widely used debugging tool on Android. With ADB, it’s possible to push a file to the /system partition, make a backup, or even get a logcat for debugging. The official way to install ADB is to download the ADT Bundle or SDK tools, which are nearly 100 MB.

Configuring the ADB on Windows is not the easiest as well, as you need to add its path in order to access it from anywhere on your PC. Downloading a huge package and the troublesome installation process may discourage new users from installing these tools, but there’s now a handy solution thanks to XDA Forum Member snoop5, who created a simple tool to install ADB on a Windows machine in approximately 15 seconds.

The Windows-only tool automatically installs ADB, Fastboot, and the required device drivers, so nothing more is required and your device should work like a charm. The package comes in at only 9 MB, so it’s quite a bit smaller than the original SDK Tools. You don’t need to worry about your system being 32- or 64-bits, as this tool will take care to determine which version are you on.

If the process of installing Fastboot and ADB have been holding you back from further tweaking your device, make your way over to the tool thread and give this a try.

 

Screen_Shot_2013-12-14_at_3.46.20PM

ADB is an incredibly versatile and useful tool for everything from simple tweaks to major modifications, and even sometimes averting a complete disaster. It is relatively easy to set up, and it is simple to use for anyone with a little knowledge. Traditionally, ADB is used over USB. But in this day and age, how many of us have time to rummage through drawers and connect devices manually? It is possible to use ADB over your local WiFi network and save yourself the hassle and a little desk clutter at the same time.

While the wireless option is not much more complicated than the USB option to set up, that process can be made even simpler with the help of ADB Over WiFi Helper by XDA Forum Member extremewing. This nifty little tool comes in two parts: a JAR file to run on your PC and an APK file for your Android devices. Once installed and set up, you’ll be able to switch devices between a USB or TCP/IP connection with the click of a button, and instantly see which devices on the network are ready and listening.

This is usually a paid application, but extremewing is generously making it available here on the XDA forums for free to all XDA community members, so be sure to check this out the thread for more information if you use ABD frequently.

It’s worth mentioning though that although using the wireless option is in some ways more convenient, it is by far the less secure of the two methods. This option should probably only be used on your own secure network, and you certainly don’t want to use it on a public network, so don’t go throwing out that micro USB cable just yet.

adb_pull

Most of us here are already quite familiar with the ADB (Android Debug Bridge). Heck, I’d even wager that many of us use it on quite a regular basis—adb pushing and pulling files, adb rebooting, running shell commands, and so on. Most new users, however, have not had such exposure. And let’s face it: For youngsters born after the emergence and popularization of the GUI, command line interfaces can be rather intimidating. So if you’re a seasoned veteran who knows ADB like the back of your hand, this article is not for you. But if you’re a new user looking to learn a little more about this great tool, read on!

The Android Debug Bridge, which comes as part of the Android SDK, allows for communication between your desktop computer and target device. So what can you do with ADB? Quite a bit. As alluded to earlier, you can push files to the device from the client PC, pull device from the device to the client PC, you can reboot (to Android, bootloader, or recovery), record a logcat, obtain a bug report, execute many standard Linux commands, and much, much more.

The biggest problem for new users becomes knowing what commands can be executed and remembering the proper syntax. Luckily, these commands and their syntax are all pretty understandable. For example, take a look at the following commands in proper syntax:

  • adb start-server : This command starts the adb daemon on your desktop computer and allows your computer to interact with your device. Note that this command isn’t essential, as executing any other ADB command will automatically start the daemon.
  • adb kill-server : As you would expect, this kills the adb daemon.
  • adb logcat : This generates a logcat, which is quite useful when figuring out where things are going wrong. You can redirect the output into a text file by using “>”. For example, you can type “adb logcat > logcat.txt” to record your logcat as logcat.txt.
  • adb bugreport : Generates a simple bug report. Just like logcat, you can redirect this into a text file using “>”
  • adb install <local apk name> : Installs an APK from your desktop computer directly to your device.
  • adb pull <source path and filename> <destination path and filename> : Pulls the specified file and deposits it into the specified folder with the specified name.
  • adb push <source path and filename> <destination path and filename> : Functions like adb pull, but in reverse.

The above, however, is not nearly comprehensive. These are just some of the more common commands that you’ll encounter.

For those looking to learn a few more, or those who would simply like to see a visual output of these commands in action, XDA Recognized Contributor doctor_droid has created a basic guide that covers everything a beginner needs to know in order to accomplish basic tasks through ADB.

Doctor_droid has also includes a direct link to the required ADB binaries for Windows users so that you don’t have to download the SDK for the sole purpose of getting ADB up and running. While the installation procedures are strictly for Windows users, the rest of the guide is equally valid for Linux and Mac users.

If you’re a new user looking to learn a little more about ADB, or even if you’re a seasoned vet looking to make sure you know all of the common commands, head over to the guide thread to learn more.

Capture

Chances are, you’ve heard of XDA Elite Recognized Developer AdamOutler‘s CASUAL tool before. Although the Java-based tool is most frequently used for acquiring root quickly and easily on various devices, there is a whole lot more that you can do with CASUAL. For those who may have forgotten, CASUAL stands for Cross-platform Android Scripting, Unified Auxiliary Loader. And as its name implies, it’s a universal infrastructure for deploying firmware and other hacks to Android  from any Windows, Linux, or Mac computer—provided that you have Java Runtime Environment installed.

Not content with simply using CASUAL for his own wiles, Adam made the project open source for other developers to build from. Now, Adam is launching a new website, CASUAL-Dev.com, where developers can find anything and everything related to CASUAL development. You may be wondering why you would want to use CASUAL as the launching point for your own development work. Well, in the words of Adam:

If you’re a developer of Android firmware, software, or exploits; CASUAL is meant for you. CASUAL provides a way to package these developments and distribute them in a way that does not exclude Windows, Linux, or Mac users. It also solves platform/device-specific problems, troubleshoots errors, and in the event that CASUAL cannot fix the problem, it provides the user with steps to take.

In addition to describing the package and its components, Adam describes how to create a CASPAC (CASUAL Package Action Container) using the CASCADE IDE. Adam’s site also walks new CASUAL developers through the process of taking a CASPAC and turning it into a full CASUAL package using CASPACkager. The whole process is documented through the use of sample code and syntax, so that the mental cost of entry is as low as possible.

Head over to CASUAL-Dev to learn how you can get started with CASUAL development.

PS. If you’re “simply” an end-user, don’t think Adam has forgotten about you either. He is also contemplating implementing a new and cleaner user interface developed by Randall Schwartzentruber. So if you like it, then you’d better put a ring on it leave a comment on Adam’s page stating that you’d like to see the new UI in the next version of CASUAL.

Jordan0902

You can now easily command your device with ADB commands from the comfort of a Windows GUI with ADB GUI. That and more are covered by Jordan, as he reviews all the important stories from this weekend. Included in this week’s news is an article about an update to Android APKTool and an app to keep track of Xbox 360 Achievements.

Jordan talks about the other videos released this weekend on XDA Developer TV. Jordan released a video talking with XDA:DevCon 2013 Sponsor Oppo and Jayce released a video talking about the day in the life of a software developer. Pull up a chair and check out this video.

READ ON »

adb-fastboot-guide

I run Linux exclusively and I was not happy when my Android device stopped enumerating as a mass storage device. The OS version I have right now doesn’t automount MTP, so how am I supposed to get files on and off of my phone? There are several options, but I think the most simple answer is to use ADB.

I have long ago figured out all the commands and syntax used with the Android Debug Bridge, but I can’t say the same for Fastboot. That’s a tool that compliments what ADB brings to the table. It can flash image files directly from your computer, unlock the bootloader, and a lot more (if you know what you’re doing).

Check out XDA Senior Member Ricky310711‘s guide thread covering common uses of both ADB and Fastboot. You may remember his Android Everything Tool that was featured on the XDA Portal last Saturday. He’s also been working on this guide since the end of April.

Included is a zip for Windows users that provides the packages needed to run ADB and Fastboot, but you may want to use this suite that always installs the latest versions. I wouldn’t say this is a noob-level guide, but anyone who’s had to look up an ADB command to get it to work (or needs a very quick refresher on Android partitions) will benefit from his accumulation of knowledge.

minimaladb

ADB and Fastboot are two of the most indispensable tools for manipulating and modifying your Android device. Offering the ability to perform all kinds of actions ranging from simple operations such as pushing and pulling certain files to unlocking bootloaders and flashing custom recovery images, these two tools are something that nearly everyone who has tinkered with an Android device in some way has been exposed to.

Despite the simple nature of both these utilities, actually getting hold of the latest versions and setting them up can often be troublesome for the less experienced user. The sure fire way to get the most recent versions is to download the Android SDK. That, however, means downloading a lot of stuff for two relatively tiny tools and let’s be honest, ain’t nobody got time for that. If it is just the single tools you’re after, there’s a very simple way of getting hold of them.

XDA Forum Member shimp208 created Minimal ADB & Fastboot which is a Windows-based installer that simply grabs the latest versions of ADB and Fastboot before installing them to a location of your choice, eliminating the need for an enormous downloads or trawling the internet for a specific version. Once you’re connected via USB and your device is recognized, you should be ready to start using ADB and Fastboot. It’s as simple as that.

Check out the original thread for more information.

 

Advertisement

XDA TV: Most Recent Video

Buy/Sell on Swappa

  • Nexus 5 (Unlocked) buy | sell
  • Galaxy Note 3 (T-Mobile) buy | sell
  • HTC One M7 (Verizon) buy | sell
  • Galaxy S 5 (Unlocked) buy | sell
  • Nexus 7 2013 buy | sell
  • Swappa is the official marketplace of XDA