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Posts Tagged: ADB

c#tool

You may remember that a while back, we brought you news of a guide for creating your own Android utilities for Windows. Although fully functional and incredibly simple to put together, command line utilities can often feel a little rough around the edges. If you have your own custom tool but would like to make it look a little more polished, this might be of interest to you.

XDA Forum Member QuantumCipher has put together a guide for creating similar tools for Windows using C#, which provides the opportunity for a much cleaner looking interface. The guide covers creating a utility capable of performing basic tasks such as ADB commands to push/pull files, reboot your device, and install APK files. Once you know how to do this, it’s possible to create tools for much more complex tasks such as rooting and unlocking devices. If you have some basic knowledge of C# already, you’ll have no trouble diving straight into this tutorial. However, complete beginners might want to do a little research on the basics before getting started.

The guide fully explains the code required to add ADB functions to the elements of the interface, as well as how to use a text box to select a file to be pushed to the device. It should have you well on the way to creating your own toolkit in no time. Check out the tutorial thread for more information.

downloaduf

If you’re an Android user, there’s really almost no reason why you shouldn’t have some basic knowledge on how to use ADB and pull a logcat. After all, what better way is there to give back to the developers that help make our mobile devices better than by giving them the tools they need to diagnose issues effectively whenever they arise? And while most casual users have used the Dalvik Debug Monitor Service to take screenshots before the feature was officially added to the stock Android UI, there’s much more that can be done with the tool.

By now, you should be no stranger to the importance of logcat. We’ve covered the topic quite a few times in the past with various tools to help you help devs looking to troubleshoot their applications. However, even with tools at your disposal, it’s always nice to know how to do the same process manually. The same can be said about ADB knowledge in general. It’s just plain useful to have, and something we’d highly recommend around here. And the ability to do so manually is the extra icing on the cake.

In this spirit, XDA Senior Member -MR.WORLDWIDE- has created a simple and introductory- to intermediate-level guide to help you accomplish all of the tasks listed above. The guide is focused towards Windows users, and it covers topics ranging from installing the Java JDK and the Android SDK, all the way to actually connecting via ADB, pulling a logcat, and using DDMS for various monitoring-related tasks. Regarding ADB commands, sample commands are given that will teach you how to accomplish tasks such as installing and uninstalling an APK from your local computer, pushing and pulling devices to and from your device, and using adb shell to access your device via command line.

Head over to the guide thread to get started

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Android-Devices

It used to be the case that whenever you wanted to use ADB or FastBoot with a device, you were required to install a specific driver for each device. For anyone regularly flashing several devices or developers who test on numerous different phones and tablets, this could prove to be something of an inconvenience, especially when setting up for the first time and having to hunt around in a dingy corner of an OEM website looking for the correct driver. Thankfully, things are somewhat simpler nowadays thanks to several different solutions to this old issue.

You may remember us previously talking about the Universal Naked Driver by XDA Senior Member 1wayjonny. This is a Windows based tool (compatible with XP, Vista, 7 and 8) that allows you to make use of ADB, Fastboot, and (for ASUS devices) APX on over 250 different devices with minimal effort. Check out the link above and the forum thread for more information on this one.

Continuing on from the success of the Universal Naked Driver, Koush has taken the device/vendor ids collected within the UND thread and used them to create an alternative solution, which claims to work on all Android phones and all versions of Windows, presumably XP and above. You can find Koush’s Universal ADB Driver and the source for it from the G+ post linked to above.

Last but certainly not least is a project entitled Casual Android Driver Installer, or CADI for short. This is the brainchild of XDA Senior Member jrloper, and like the two already mentioned options, it attempts to alleviate the frustration of device-specific drivers. The difference with CADI though is that it is fully integrated into the CASUAL by XDA Elite Recognized Developer AdamOutler and takes a somewhat different approach to the problem. It uses elements of an open source USB device driver installer called libwdi by Pete Batard and essentially determines which devices are connected via USB before generating drivers on the fly and automatically taking care of the installation process. That’s a pretty good example of three open source projects coming together in a glorious trinity of non-proprietary loveliness if ever I saw one.

So if you are still plagued by the problem of individual drivers for each of your devices, it’s definitely in your best interests to look into one, or indeed all of these options. Let us know your preferred method of driver avoidance in the comments below.

 

 

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