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Posts Tagged: All Android

complexnumber

It’s not quite back-to-school time anymore, and not many people deal with complex numbers on a day to day basis. But if you’re a student or engineer, it never hurts to incorporate a new tool to streamline your tasks.

XDA Forum Member WeissenbornC recently created an app to help you work with complex numbers more easily. The app is divided up into four pages: basic arithmetic, quadratic equation, roots, and polynomial factorization.

Basic Arithmetic allows you to perform simple operations on complex numbers such as adding or multiplying them, taking their root, or performing trigonometric functions. Quadratic Equation allows you to use real and complex coefficients to solve using the quadratic equation. Roots allows you to solve n-degree polynomials for all of the roots using the Durand Kerner Method. Finally, Polynomial Factorization takes an n-degree polynomial and divides it into n factors.

If you’re a student or engineer constantly working with complex numbers or if you simply want a tool to help you with quadratic factorization, Complex Numbers can potentially be a huge time saver. Head over to the application thread to give Complex Numbers a shot!

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It’s reasonable to go out on a limb and assume that most of our readers have at least 50 apps installed on their mobile devices. Because of this, we often turn to sidebar launcher apps such as the recently updated SideControl to make all of these apps easier to launch. But sometimes, instead of making apps easier to get to, what we really want to do is escape for a bit. After all, having a cluttered home screen full of dozens of folders and apps can get quite tiresome.

Thankfully, there are great options out there for those looking to simplify. For example, there are quite a few minimalist templates available in the popular Themer app. But what if you want something even simpler? XDA Senior Member alobo offers a fantastic option called Crescendo.

Although Crescendo is technically aimed at making mobile devices easier to use for seniors and kids, it’s a stylish alternative for those looking for a more minimal Android experience. The app includes a streamlined and task-based home screen. But instead of being filled with a sea of apps, your home screen gives you information about the weather and allows you to perform certain common tasks such as making calls, taking pictures, browsing the Internet, writing Emails, and looking at photos. Crescendo also provides an app drawer to allow you to still reach your favorite apps, but they no longer create clutter from your start screen.

In addition to its home screen functionality, Crescendo is also loaded with several simplified apps such as an easy-to-use web browser and flashlight. It also integrates various commonly accessed settings into a simplified menu.

Whether you’re looking for a home screen app for those unfamiliar with technology or you just want to simplify your Android experience, Crescendo is a great and aestehtically appealing option. Head over to the application thread to give it a shot.

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Widgets are some of the most useful staples of our Android home screens. They’re also perhaps the biggest differentiation we have to set our devices apart from the generic grid of icons found on iDevices. Widgets come in all shapes and sizes, and there are options to handle pretty much every task imaginable.

Since most of us use widgets to personalize our home screens, wouldn’t it be nice to have a widget that’s a bit more one of a kind than something that can also be installed by every other Android user? With XDA Senior Member newHere:)‘s app DrawTime, you can now create your own one-of-a-kind clock widget.

Using DrawTime is quite simple. You start off by drawing a set of template numbers. These can be any shape and color of your choosing, and you can even use multiple colors per template number. Next, you configure your clock by choosing what application is launched when tapping the widget, as well as how you would like your clock to be displayed. Finally, you add your widget, and you’re good to go with a truly unique widget that is sure to set your home screen apart from every other Android device.

If you want that last bit of personalized flair on your home screen, head over to the application thread and give DrawTime a shot.

0xkrakb

Not too long ago, we featured an innovative quick access shortcut bar by XDA Forum Member Jawomo called SideCuts. In the time since, the sidebar launcher has donned a new name, SideControl, and it has been rewritten to incorporate several new and important features. But with so many fantastic sidebar launchers available, is SideControl worthy of its space in your app drawer?

Just as before, SideControl allows you to easily launch apps, shortcuts, contacts, and bookmarks from practically anywhere on your device. And like we first saw in the initial version, this can be accomplished with up to eight gestures that can be executed at any time and in any app.

New to this new iteration, SideControl now supports the latest Android notification features. With this, SideControl is able to open your latest notifications with a predefined gesture and/or open a sidebar with all apps that contain open notifications. It now also supports HaloFloatingWindow by XDA Senior Member zst123 so that you can open your sidebar apps in a floating window. But of course, you have to have Xposed and the HaloFloatingWindow installed to enable this functionality. Finally, you can even attach music controls and settings toggles to the supported gestures.

Now more than ever, SideCuts is a great alternative in the sea of sidebar launchers, Make your way over to the application thread to give it a shot.

Capture

We’ve talked quite a bit about XDA Senior Member astoncheah‘s “C” series of applications in the past. Bringing both Convenience and Customization, C Locker allows its users to launch applications and perform various tasks directly from their lock screens.

Since its initial release last March, C Locker has seen plenty of frequent and feature filled updates. The last we heard of the app was back in early February, when it received a substantial upgrade to version 4. This update brought many important features such as Tasker integration and improved lock screen notifications for devices running Android 4.3 or newer.

Now, version 5 has been released, and with it, come several new and important features. For starters, the new version allows for users to add multiple widgets to the lock screen, including one third party widget. And on the topic of widgets, the music widget now shows up automatically when music is playing.

In addition to the new features, this update also ups the polish on existing features by making the settings layout more user friendly, adding a notification count for incoming notifications, and enabling root users to hide the status and navigation bars.

Whether you’re a longtime C Locker user or you’ve never tried it before, head over to the application thread to get started.

Preview1

It should come as no surprise that the cleanest and most robust way to introduce your own modifications to an existing project is through modifying the original source code and recompiling. However, this is not always possible. Often times, we must begin our journey to app or ROM modification from a closed source binary, and then work from there.

Luckily, there are various tools available to make life a little easier when not working with source. One such tool comes from XDA Recognized Contributor ricky310711. As one would expect from a typical ROM kitchen, Ricky’s ROM Kitchen allows you to perform various tasks to existing ROMs such as adding init.d support, busybox, root, and so on.

With this toolkit, you can also extract the ROM’s constituent files, deodex, and add various tweaks. The kitchen even allows you to easily de-Knox Samsung OEM ROMs. In addition to modifying ROMs, Ricky’s ROM Kitchen also allows you to modify APK and JAR files. To that end, you can quickly decompile and compile APK and JAR files, as well as classes.dex.

Although modifying and building from source is always preferable, it’s not always feasible. If you’ve been looking for a very versatile tool to help your non-source built modifications, head over to the utility thread to get started.

Samsung-KIES

Playing with custom ROMs and kernels is fun, but sometimes a phone needs to be restored to its stock, vanilla state. With Google Nexus devices, this is extremely easy, as no additional tool other than fastboot is needed. With Sasmung, Sony, and other devices, the situation becomes more complicated and some guidance might be required.

To restore Samsung device, you can pursue two methods: Odin and Kies. You can find plenty of guides on how to use Odin, but using Kies may require some explanation. With a guide written by XDA Forum Member SadEff, you will learn how to fully restore your device with Kies.

The guide also shows you how to unroot your phone and fix various issues that may be encountered. SadEff carefully describes every step of the process, and includes various photos to make the process easy for even total newcomers. After the process is complete, your phone will look it’s straight from the factory—or at least it’s software will. The process can be applied to every Samsung device with firmware newer than Android 4.1 Jelly Bean.

To get started learning more about Kies, make your way to the guide thread. You can find all necessary information there.

Flappy_Bird_hard

What’s the most popular mobile game since the days of Angry Birds? The answer is obviously Flappy Bird. This addictive game has seen so many remixes, that you were able to flap the Doge, Pou, and almost everything in between. The game’s developer had his 15 minutes of fame, and many others have created entertaining clones as a result..

Since Flappy Birds is so successful, why not try making a clone yourself? It’s possible, and there are some great guides to help you do so, such as the one written by XDA Forum Member VOS. The tutorial shows how to make a Flappy Bird clone using Basic4Android and LibGDX.

Admittedly, the steps aren’t short, but it’s definitely a great way to learn how to create a simple game, making it a perfect starting point for beginning game developers. The guide itself is very detailed and describes every stage of game creation, along with the required code resources and graphics.

If you always wanted to crate your own game, you now have the perfect occasion to try. It’s not easy and will require a few somewhat advanced programming techniques. But with a bit of effort and patience, you will make your own, hopefully even more successful game. You can find more information in the original thread.

android-23-sd-card-support

In recent Android releases, Google has become more and more unwilling to cater to the use of external SD cards. It was never quite clear why Google decided to abandon SD card support in their Nexus devices, but many believe this to be due to the added simplicity of removing another storage area.

While Google nixed the idea on its own devices, various OEMs decided to keep SD card slots in their devices. To use them properly, some modifications to Android’s source code were needed. And due to changes in how some later versions of Android handled SD cards, many applications lost the ability to access external SD cards. Luckily, Xposed Framework allows users to modify various aspects of their OS without messing around with the files themselves.

Annoyed by the external storage situation, XDA Senior Member defim created a module to fix the aforementioned issues. The only thing required to apply the fix is to enable the module in the Xposed Installer after successfully installing it on your rooted device.

If you are suffering from external storage handling problems on your Android 4.0.3+ device, make your way to the original thread and give this module a shot.

Jordan0328

Android 4.4.2 KitKat for the AT&T Samsung Galaxy Note 3 is rolling out! That and much more news is covered by Jordan, as he reviews all the important stories from this week. Included in this week’s news is the announcement of Sony has made some Open Source archives available for the Sony Xperia Z2 and Z2 tablet and how Chainfire rooted the Samsung Galaxy S 5 ahead of it’s release! That’s not all that’s covered in today’s video!

Jordan talks about the other videos released this week on XDA Developer TV. XDA Developer TV Producer TK released an Xposed Tuesday video for Gesture Control. He then showed you how to root the Samsung Galaxy Gear. Finally, he gave us an Android App Review of Shareboard. Pull up a chair and check out this video.
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7037999

For the few reading this who are unaware, a system-on-a-chip (or simply SoC) is an unit that combines various hardware components into single chip. Some SoCs have better support and documentation than the others (Qualcomm for example), while Exynos or NovaThor are a world of hurt for developers. ST-Ericsson’s NovaThor has been giving developers quite a few headaches when creating usable custom ROMs, but a group of developers managed to find the solution for all these problems.

For a long time, these sources were closed. Now, the NovaFusion team (which includes XDA Senior Members New Macław and marcin1147) decided to go open source and push their fixes to GitHub. This type of action is always encouraged on XDA, as we are all here to learn and share.

With these fixes, CyanogenMod and other custom ROMs for Xperia P, U, Sola, Go and many more devices featuring the NovaThor SoC will be attainable. The move taken by NovaFusion team will open up new possibilities in ROM development to these devices and strengthen the community spirit in the forums.

The source code can be found on the team’s GitHub. You can also find ROM releases by visiting the home page of the project or their corresponding threads on XDA.

asda

It’s a sunny, warm day. You are walking in the park, looking at your lovely surroundings. Suddenly, you get distracted and your phone falls down onto the concrete—seemingly in slow motion. All you hear is a loud crack, and the worst-case scenario comes true: Your phone has a cracked screen. I imagine that many of you have undergone such trauma.

In such a situation, many would be tempted to purchase a new device. But selling your existing phone in such a condition would be difficult, so why not repair it yourself? If you don’t know how, you are in the right place. XDA Senior Member hamsteyr described the process of replacing a broken screen broken phone with a simple tools.

Admittedly, the process is not the easiest you can run across browsing our forum. But with a bit of practice, you can replace the screen on your own. The step-by-step guide is full of pictures, so you can see with your own eyes how this should look. After some time and a lot of patience, your phone will be like new and you will be able to back to enjoying your device.

If your phone recently kissed the concrete and your screen is now cracked, you should visit the guide thread to fix it on your own. We can only wish you the best of luck.

shareboard

If you want to get updates about your friends or want your friends to know what you are up to, or if you simply want to share lame current affairs jokes, the best place to do this is on a social network. But sometimes, you want to share across all of them at the same times–and you want an Android app to do that. Well there is a solution out there.

XDA Senior Member anandbibek offers up an application that shares a post across all of your social networks. In this video, XDA Developer TV Producer TK reviews Shareboard. TK shows off the application and gives his thoughts, so check out this app review.

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