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Posts Tagged: All Android

Floatify

Recently. we talked about Floatify, a handy app by XDA Senior Member Jawomo that brings Android L-style floating notifications to your pre-L device. While the original release was already packed with a bunch of features like interactive notifications, the ability to open in xHalo, and lockscreen placement, there is always room for improvement in any product. Jawomo realized this and updated Floatify with a bunch of new features.

The latest release brings direct actions such as Reply, Call Back, and so on, and allows the user to respond to the notification from the lockscreen, without the need to open the app. In addition to direct actions, Jawomo has also added favorite actions, which allows you to link actions to a gesture, for example, expanding the notification with a single tap and opening it in xHalo with a long press. Lastly, status bar gestures have been added, which allows you to open the notification popup or dimiss notifications by just swiping down on the status bar, even if it isn’t visible.

Regardless of whether you’re an existing Floatify user, or someone who’s not yet tried it out, the latest Floatify update is full of promise. Head over to the Floatify app thread to get started.

emojiswitcher

Emoji adds quite a lot to the text messages we send and receive all day. Without them, we’d all be left with only repeated letters and exclamation marks to help us figure out just exactly what the person on the other end is actually saying and feeling. Now, because numerous devices and operating systems have their own emoji, you may fancy the look on other devices. If this sounds like the predicament you’re in, you may want to check out Emoji Switcher.

Developed by XDA Senior Member Electrodeath0, Emoji Switcher allows you to easily and conveniently switch out your current set of emoji with another. All you have to do is open up the app, upon which it will detect which emoji set is default, and select which set you want to have instead. As of now, Emoji Switcher supports Google, Samsung, iOS and LG emoji sets. Furthermore, the app is open source, so if you feel like adding more, or want to tinker with the app a bit further, you can check out its GitHub.

Currently, Emoji Switcher is compatible with only devices running Android 4.4 and with root access. If you would like to check it out, visit the application thread for more information.

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Device Review: LG G3

July 16, 2014   By:

lgg3

lgg3The LG G3 was announced at the end of May, and has just recently started reaching more general availability. This device builds upon the popularity of the previously released G2 from last year, bringing along with it a few key upgrades. But are those upgrades worth the price? Let’s find out. READ ON »

Search Everything

There are several thousands of files of various kinds within the confines of our devices. They may be things that we put there ourselves such as pictures, documents, APKs, etc. On top of that, you also have the files that are part of the OS, which may be more or less based on what kind of device you have, what brand, and what OS flavor and version you are carrying. The combination of both of the aforementioned makes one hell of a mess if you need to search for a specific file.

To deal with the clutter, there are various solutions out there—most of them in the shape of file managers such as Astro, ES File Explorer, Solid, and many others that allow you to search for a specific file. The problem with these is the fact that not all of them are quick enough as they have to comb through folders upon folders of files. Granted that in order to reduce the time, one can always refine the searches to look in specific areas, but you may be missing out on your target if you exclude the wrong folder.

With the need for speed in mind, XDA Forum Member marl1234 created an application called Search Everything. This app was modeled after a PC program called Everything. The app, in essence, will allow the user to look for any file within fractions of a second. Upon starting up, Search Everything looks for all files in the device and it will index them. After that, whenever you type something on the search bar, the results for any matching string will appear right in front of your eyes almost instantly. On top of that, the app offers the ability to force open the file that you searched for with the app of your choice. This is analogous to Windows’s “Open With” option present in the context menu and it means no longer depending on how your device wants to treat your files but rather how you want to do it.

The app is still in early stages of development. This means that the app is not yet perfect and has some faults, the major (current) one being that the app is unable to skim through the SD card (which is not really an issue for Nexus users). Please swing by the thread if you are interested in a search tool on steroids. Happy searching. You can find more information in the Search Everything app thread.

heads up notifications

Easter Eggs: we all love them and finding them is always a thrill. Whether it be added features or just random silliness, finding treats in a program is invigorating, so imagine how many Android enthusiasts are excited about the heads up notifications feature hidden deep inside KitKat.

In this episode of XDA Xposed Tuesday, XDA Developer TV Producer TK reviews an Xposed Module that lets you activate the pop up notification panel feature in KitKat. XDA Recognized Developer MohammadAG created the Heads Up Notifications module. TK shows off the modules and gives his thoughts, so check out this Xposed Tuesday video.

READ ON »

android ROM building

Every developer, even the most capable, was at one point a newcomer. When you are a new to development and need light to show the way, there’s little better than a guide showing you where to start your journey.

If you want to try your luck with developing for Android, XDA Recognized Contributor jackeagle offers you a nice ride through the depths of coding. Jackeagle wrote a complex guide, in which you can find information about Android and its basics, as well as what is even more important, instructions on setting up a build environment using Linux. You will find a step-by-step tutorial about how to install Ubuntu on Virtualbox and configure it properly to build your very first ROM compiled from source. Every step is illustrated with a screenshot, so it’s really hard to get lost.

This guide was meant to serve a vital purpose for newcomers who haven’t yet had a chance to play deeply with Linux and Android. If you know how to use Linux, it’s still a good reminder about all commands needed in setting up process.

To find out more about Linux and Android and eventually build your own ROM from source, head over to the guide thread to get started.

Shortpaste copy paste

URL links can be a real pain when you’re on your phone or tablet. We’ve all had those moments when trying to copy an URL and we struggle to highlight the entire thing, thanks to a stray tap or because the URL is simply too long and the link takes up more than half of your screen when trying to paste it. And unfortunately, standalone URL shorteners are often too cumbersome to efficiently use.

Because of this, XDA Senior Member Mohammad_Adib developed ShortPaste. This app rids you of such woes by automatically shortening all links you highlight and copy on your device. Once started and allowed to run in the background, Shortpaste pastes any link you copy in shortened form. By default ShortPaste uses goo.gl, but it also allows the use of bit.ly in the options. In addition, you can trim the “http://” prefix and set a custom Bit.ly username and API key. And if you want to revisit any links you’ve shortened before, you can access a list of them in the archive.

Shortpaste is compatible with any device running Android 4.0 and newer, and can be downloaded for free from the Play store. If you would like to check it out, head over to the application thread for more information.

sony-logo

If you haven’t heard already, XDA is putting on its second annual xda:devcon. This year, we’re doing it international style and holding the event in Manchester, UK on the weekend of September 26-28. We have great sponsors from Sony and Oppo who joined us last year, to newcomer OnePlus. However, it takes more than great sponsors to make an event like the successful, it takes great speakers.

Returning to xda:devcon is a speaker from last year. Founding member of the “Free Xperia Project” and now a Community Manager with Sony Developer Relations, Alin Jerpelea has a core technical background and has been active on XDA since 2006 on multiple platforms.

At xda:devcon ’13, Jerpelea gave a presentation entitled “Android on Legacy Devices – Use It or Lose It.” In that presentation, he holds a dialog with the audience and talks about how Android support on legacy devices from developers is demanded by a lot of people because manufacturers rarely release Android updates. Developers and members at XDA work hard to support devices on new Android versions. Jerpelea pondered how much we should push those devices. Is it enough to have the latest Android version booted, or do we want more? Check out the video to see what they have to say on this video from last year.

This year, Jerpelea returns and offers up another excellent presentation. This time, he will be giving a talk entitled “AOSP For Sony Devices: Past, Present and Future.” Have you ever wondered what Sony is doing to open up for more collaboration and more innovation in the Open Source community? In this session Alin will share with you where Sony is taking AOSP for Xperia in the short term. Sony wants to support external community innovation, so Alin will discuss how Sony will improve their work on openness around AOSP.

Join us September 26 to 28 in Manchester for XDA:DevCon 2014. Register to attend using this link for exclusive savings. Hurry as the Early Bird registration ends August 1st.

Android L Floating Button

It’s been a while since Android L’s official unveiling. We are now waiting for Google to squash all the bugs and release this bad boy to the public. One of the major improvements introduced in Android L is Material Design. In due time, most apps should will be polished to meet new guidelines, but some devs have begun experimenting with Material Design-like imagery on KitKat or Jelly Bean.

Some parts of Material Design can be found in the latest Google+ update. And with this app, you can see how the Android L floating button looks in action. A floating menu button can be added to every application. XDA Forum Moderator Faiz Malkani created a library that allows devs to customize the button by setting a color and drawable. Faiz Malkani added a short guide how to add his library into existing or new projects. It’s relatively easy and requires just a few additions in the source.

It’s not necessary to use Android L Developer Preview in order to test this library. It should work like a charm with all applications on KitKat or Jelly Bean.

You can add a floating menu button to your application and make it more Android L-like. Make your way to the FABulous Library thread to get started.

Jordan0714

Android L Developer Preview has been ported to HTC One! That and much more news is covered by Jordan, as he reviews all the important stories from this weekend. Included in this weekend’s news is how Google may consider changing the SD Card access rules in final Android L and the story about enabling Chromecast mirroring from Any Device! That’s not all that’s covered in today’s video!

Be sure to check out the other videos released this week on XDA Developer TV. XDA Developer TV Producer TK released an Xposed Tuesday video for NotifyClean. Then, AdamOutler investigated Smartphone Charging. And later, TK gave us a an Android App Review of Notific. Pull up a chair and check out this video.

READ ON »

Android Backup 3.0

How important is it for you to have your device just the way you like it, particularly after hopping around ROMs like a bunny on caffeine? Does this interfere with you ORD? If you are like the rest of us, it more than likely does. Setting up your status bar with the right colors or transparency levels can be a daunting task for anyone, regardless of your level of mastery with the Android platform. To make matters worse, this is but one of the many general settings that people mess around with on their devices. There are other modifications that may involve messing with app specific DPI, setting up multiple user accounts, and of course, who can forget the ever popular need to re-enter your WiFi passwords for your home, office, school, and so on? We know that there are several apps out there that can perform master backups of everything that is contained on your device, but sometimes getting the old settings to back up properly can be a challenge on its own accord. Because of this, XDA Senior Member Kisler developed an app that tries to focus on this one part.

Backup v3.0 is a small backup application that focuses mainly on the general settings for your device. It is small and quite straightforward, with a very simple-to-use UI (unlike apps such as TiBu, which now has over 9000 options, settings, and other features). The app requests root access to work, which makes sense as it needs to write to areas with elevated permissions. Once root is granted, the app presents you with just a few simple options including where you wish to save the backup and what you wish to save. You are also given the option to restore from the backup. Simple, right?

The app is still in early development. With the right kind of feedback, an app in such early stages can easily become a more powerful tool than many of its elder brethren. but with far more ease of use. Please take it for a spin and let the dev know how it performs. Also, if you speak another language and would like to take a shot at making the app friendly for people who may speak languages other than English, drop by as well and offer your support. After all, that is what a community project is all about.You can find more information in the Backup 3.0 app thread.

Now Material Browser

As stated in a previous article, each individual replacement browser brings its own strengths to the table. These ultimately benefit the overall Android ecosystem by giving more options to the end user. However, because of the way computing is in this day and age, apps are growing larger and more bloated with each and every iteration. Coders waste no effort in attempting to add more features that make the overall experience richer. However, this takes a toll on the size of the apps that we use. Take Google Chrome for Android for instance, which sits at a hefty 63.5 MB. For newer devices, this is not an issue as they come with at least 16 GB of internal storage–out of which, a large chunk can be used for apps. For devices with lower amounts of storage, Chrome can become somewhat of a luxury. Because of this, many people look around for alternatives that provide maximum functionality without having to sacrifice precious storage. If you are among these people, look no further because XDA Senior Member Jeeko has the solution that you need.

Now Material Browser is a full featured browser that sits in your device occupying just a mere 160 KB. No, that’s not a typo. And as its name implies, the browser is made based on Google Now aesthetics and functionality as well as an added touch of Material Design. It offers much of the same functionality that the big players do such as tabbed browsing, Adobe Flash compatibility, Javascript Acceleration, incognito mode, and much more. Another feature that it offers is that of gesture-based navigation, which is great for one handed operation. Again, all this (and more) is delivered with the smallest possible footprint on your device.

The dev is looking for feedback on bugs, requested features, and performance for different devices. So, please take it for a spin and see if you would like to free up about 60 MB off of your device! You can find more information in the Now Material Browser app thread. Happy browsing!

Qcktag

How many times have you called a phone number only to forget who the number belongs to? Or perhaps someone called you and you forgot to add the name to your contacts list. In certain situations, numbers aren’t really worth keeping, as you will only use them for a few hours or maybe a day.

XDA Forum Member sreenisatish came up with an idea to create something between a sticky and contact book. Qcktag allows its users to tag numbers both from incoming and outgoing calls, so you can keep numbers not exactly worth keeping in your phone’s memory without losing the ability to identify the caller. After opening an app, you can send a text message to the pseudo-contact or add them to your true contact list.

The idea behind this app is pretty brilliant because it keeps your phone’s contact list tidy and you won’t mistake any these numbers for truly unknown numbers. The app doesn’t require root access, and it works on every device with Android 4.0.4 Ice Cream Sandwich and greater.

You get this application by visiting the Qcktag thread. If you like the concept, go there and give Qcktag a try.

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