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Posts Tagged: Android 4.0 (Ice Cream Sandwich)

3DWallpaper

A few weeks ago, we brought you news about an app that enabled 3D on the EVO 3D at all times by XDA Recognized Contributor jmztaylor. In that article, we stated that one of the cool things that one could do with this would be to have actual 3D wallpapers on your screen. However, the process of getting these on the screen is not as straight forward as one would think. On Sense, when a wallpaper is chosen, the OS will automatically try to crop it (whether you want to or not), and in the case of 3D pictures, it will try to flatten them, removing the 3D in the process. XDA Forum Member HJ200 posted a quick procedure in jmztaylor’s thread that explains how to add a 3D wallpaper to your homescreen. However, the picture needed to be pre-processed and with the exact required size.

Since then, HJ200 has been hard at work and finally decided to put a quick application that embeds itself in the system. Essentially, it adds an option to use 3D pictures (in mpo and jps format) as a wallpaper for the device. This app automatically does everything for you. It interlaces and parses images so that they are ready to be used. The only caveat is that the images will only work in landscape mode for the same reasons that were previously quoted regarding the 3D switch on the app.

In any case, the opportunities opened can indeed breath new life onto the dying idea of portable 3D. If you have any suggestions on how to make the app a little better, or maybe if you have suggestions to take this concept for a different spin, please share your ideas.

 Hi everyone,

I’ve created an app to select a 3D wallpaper. :P

You can find more information in the original thread.

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shadowrun

We have seen some rather unique concepts on XDA when it comes to indie games. Everything from seeing who can scan the largest number of BT devices to fighting virtual zombies invading your city in a pseudo-AR fashion. After all, slinging birds at pigs can get monotonous after a while. Because of this, seeing new concepts such as that presented in Shadowrun by XDA member eyeballgames is refreshing to say the least.

Have you ever used your fingers to pretend that you are a little man running and jumping from table to table as you walked across a restaurant in a Pitfall fashion? If you have, then you should have no issues playing this game. Essentially, your goal is to run as far as possible, using your fingers as legs. This will move Shadow (main character in the game) and it will allow him to run, jump, and avoid obstacles to make it as far as possible without drifting away from the path. The game is set in a thriller type of atmosphere (black and white graphics) with music to match it, so that you are always at the edge of your seat while playing it.

So far, a few people have seen and played the game, and believe that it is hard to master it. However, the game is a work in progress, and as such it could benefit from feedback and suggestions to make the game easier (or harder) and fix any and all present glitches. Judging from screenshots, it may be best to try it out in a tablet if you have one available. What are you waiting for? Get your fingers off the mouse and keyboard, and take them for a work-out on your device and see how far you can get!

This is the runner with original mechanic “running fingers”!

You can find more information in the game thread.

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kindle-fire-hd-root

Just earlier today, we discussed the invulnerable, un-crackable, Kindle Fire HD7 (bootloader, anyway). We talked about how Amazon was trying their hardest to keep you purchasing one important thing for them: content. We also talked about how the device is very well protected at the bootloader level, which means that no custom ROMs will surface any time soon. Having said that, we just became aware thanks to a thread by XDA Elite Recognized Developer jcase that the Kindle Fire HD7 was finally free from its chains and successfully rooted. As it turns out, the exploit was nothing new, and in fact, it was a method developed by XDA Recognized Contributor sparkym3 for the Eee Transformer Prime.

A while back, sparkym3 found an exploit for ICS that allowed developers easily obtain root. However, shortly after it was published, Google patched up the exploit and it stopped working on more updated builds of ICS and above. Fast forward a few months, and we are sitting in front of an ICS-based device. As it turns out, it looks like the good people from Amazon did not exactly do their due diligence, and happened to miss a commit posted on AOSP that discussed and dealt with the hole found by sparkym3. When devs started looking for exploits and tried a few out, this one seemed to work. It was tried a few times over and confirmed that the invulnerable device indeed had an Achilles’ heel. All in all, the hole is present in the latest KF code. This prompted the dev to pick up the old exploit again and write an easy-to-use tool for this partuclar device.

The new app can be found under the name Qemu Automated Root, and using it is a simple ordeal. Y0u simply need to make sure that you have the correct drivers installed on your PC, which also happen to be provided in the thread. So, if this is what you were waiting for to make the jump to the HD 7 while laughing at Amazon’s misfortune, take it for a spin. If you truly need some hand holding to do this, XDA Forum Member reverendkjr has posted a video on how to root the device.

 This tool will root your device based on my qemu local.prop root method.

You can find more information in the original thread and relevant AP article.

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[Thanks to jcase for the tip!]

nativesd

The HTC HD2 is one of those devices that has made history on XDA due to the durable and long lasting body, great hardware, and its incredible versatility. Since it was originally ported back in the 2010-2011 time frame, Android has only been getting better and better, not to mention faster on the device. It went from running from the SD card to running from NAND in a short period of time. However, people wanted more responsiveness and smoothness out of the device. They wanted a closer experience to an actual Android device, without losing the flexibility of Windows Mobile. After thinking about it long and hard, XDA Recognized Contributors securecrt and Xylograph put their heads together and came up with a new way of flashing ROMs onto the device (be it WM or Android). Introducing NativeSD.

The concept behind this new method is actually quite interesting. The whole idea came from the fact that when choosing a flashing method on the HTC HD2, there is a trade off. NAND is faster than regular SD, but SD gives you more storage. The premise behind this is to combine the benefits of both. It turns out that speeds on some of the higher end class SD cards are actually faster than those of NAND (4 MB/s on NAND as opposed to about 10 MB/s on a Class 10 SD card). So, the devs devised a way to flash onto an Ext4 partition (which provides great performance enhancements on I/O). As an added bonus, your data partition becomes MUCH bigger than anything you could possibly achieve by flashing on NAND. All in all, a win-win situation for HD2 owners.

As an added bonus, this allows you to possibly flash multiple ROMs on the same device for multi-booting. Windows Mobile ROMs can be flashed as well, but it is still experimental. What are you waiting for? Take it for a spin and let the devs know if it works well by dropping some feedback and get your ORD going.

This is an idea to make the HD2 faster and fancy, I worked with Xylograph to make it more usable and easy to implement by common users.

You can find more information in the original thread.

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[Thanks timmymarsh for the tip!]

kindle-fire-hd-1

As is customary with most devices from major manufacturers, the new Kindle Fire HD brothers are coming out of Amazon’s womb very much locked down. Well, not just locked down—that would be a bit of an understatement. The KFHD family is beyond being locked, and according to Amazon’s engineers, the new system is impossible to crack. XDA Recognized Contributor kinfauns has started a discussion thread in the newly added forum to talk about and discuss the possible cracks available (if any) on these devices.

The original KF was a rather tough cookie to crack, as Amazon tried to prevent people from using these devices to do things outside of the intended usage (which in this case was their digital “store front”). Since the original (or first generation) was cracked with root and custom ROMs  flying all over the web, the designers of the device were tasked with preventing this from happening again. From Amazon’s perspective, it makes perfect sense to protect the devices from rooting and general hackery due to quite a few obvious points:

  • Services used in an unintended manner such as tethering
  • Direct access to tons of media content that could be hacked and transferred to others (piracy)
  • Warranty claims (the previous hacking method on the original KF actually ended up bricking quite a few devices)
All these reasons are similar in nature to those used by Apple in their (futile) attempts to curb all of the above. After all, we have to remember that Apple and Amazon are in it to sell you content (thanks Jeff for that analysis). The only issue is the fact that the tab is built on the Android platform, which caters to developers for the most part. Lets face it, anyone wanting a simple eReader would likely go with one of the e-ink versions (cheaper, easier on the eyes, lighter, battery lasts forever, etc). This makes us wonder a bit about the market that they are trying to target with the KFHD.
The KFHD7 seems to be designed to be a straight-up competitor to the Google Nexus 7. This device is geared towards people who want to have rich media experience in a medium sized format (with similar access to content to the KF) while also serving as a development platform for the Android community. Based on specs alone (processor, screen, memory, etc), the KFHD7 is geared towards the same audience. So, why lock out a good chunk of your potential customers by “making it more secure?” It would be interesting to see numbers accompanying the aforementioned reasons for locking the device to see if they actually justify adding such tight security. Scaring people away with extreme security measures is not exactly a good sales technique, particularly if the target audience is keen on trying to make the devices they buy into something a tad more usable.
In any case, if you happen to have any insight into the new bootloader structure and the extra processor security added to the KF (and even the second generation KF), please leave some feedback in the thread. I guess that Amazon engineers have not been around our site too much. And as such, they fail to realize that the words “impossible” and “hack” cannot be used in the same sentence around here.
Please leave us your thoughts.

 The MLO (xloader, 1st stage bootloader) is signed and the boot header is the type used for HS (high security) OMAP devices with the M-Shield turned on. If the setup is comparable to the Nook Tablet, this is not good news for those hoping to modify these devices in one way or another. The Nook Tablet’s exploit was to utilize the external sdcard as an alternate boot device and that doesn’t really help with these 2nd generation KFs.

You can find more information in the original thread.

Want something published in the Portal? Contact any News Writer.

[Thanks willverduzco for the tip!]

bunnyeyes

For those of us who own an HTC EVO 3D, we tend to be hit, from time to time, with questions about our investments. Questions like, “why did Sprint take over a year to release something that was ready to go way before?” or “Will we be getting JB like the other devices that are getting it?” However, a question that more often than not plagues my mind as an owner of this device is, “Where else can I use the 3D display?” Being able to watch a few movies and play certain games in 3D is cool, but there should certainly be other things that can be done to take advantage of the panel technology—like a 3D interface, 3D wallpaper, and so on.

If you are thinking about these possible uses and more, XDA Recognized Contributor jmztaylor has written a nice little app that will allow you to use 3D at all times during normal operation. Essentially, the app changes a value in the 3D panel controller, which turns it on and leaves it in that state. Due to rotation obviously being an issue with this (remember how the camera always complains whenever you try to take pictures while holding the phone vertically?), the app allows you to turn the 3D feature on either for landscape or portrait mode. The only one thing that can be somewhat cumbersome is that this app will render your light sensor useless and will boost and lock your brightness at 100%. This effect will go away as soon as you turn off the 3D functionality through the app.

So, if the idea of having actual 3D wallpaper makes you salivate, make sure that you try out this simple yet fulfilling app and leave some feedback for the dev.

 This app just echo’s a number in 3D_mode to enable complete device 3D. Either Landscape or Portrait. 

You can find more information in the original thread.

Want something written in the Portal? Contact any News Writer.

Jordan

This has been another great week for the XDA Portal. XDA Developer TV Producer Jordan covers all the news you need to know to keep up to date on mobile phone developments. Jordan talks about the news of replacing S-Voice with Google Now on the Samsung Galaxy S III. Jordan mentions Boot to Gecko being available for Verizon and GSM Galaxy Nexuses—or is it Nexii? Jordan mentions XDA Developer TV videos for this week including: XDA Developer TV Producer Azrienoch’s discussion of the Amazon Kindle Fire Line Business strategy; XDA Elite Recognized Developer and XDA Developer TV Producer AdamOutler’s Part 5 of How to Build an Android App; and XDA Developer TV Producer TK’s review of TeamViewer QuickSupport.

In Jelly Bean news, Jordan mentions the leaks for the Samsung Galaxy Tab 2 and Galaxy Note 10.1. Also, mentioned is the OTA Jelly Bean for the Sprint Galaxy Nexus. Finally, the Samsung Galaxy S III GT-I9300 will be getting Jelly Bean in October. And in Ice Cream Sandwich news, Jordan mentions AOSP release of ICS for the Thunderbolt and the AT&T Samsung Captivate Glide getting ICS from KIES. Lastly, Jordan mentions the XDA contest to win a Verizon Galaxy S III and XDA’s presence at Big Android BBQ. Pull up a chair and check out this video.

READ ON »

Thunderbolt AOSP

Getting AOSP working on a device is always a big deal. In fact, we we mention AOSP-based ROMs quite frequently on the Portal. It’s vanilla Android at its finest and many users prefer it to Android that’s been flavored by OEMs. Now, the HTC Thunderbolt has some AOSP ICS goodness, and this time you can even use data!

For Thunderbolt owners, data has been the big struggle with AOSP ports and, it is finally over. XDA Senior Member [SP]JESTER, along with some others, have released an Ice Cream Sandwich AOSP ROM with data, call signal, and MMS all working. This makes it the first ICS AOSP ROM on the Thunderbolt to have working data.

The ROM itself seems to be very close to being in perfect running condition. Here is a list of the only things left that are wrong with it:

Video Camera still Broke
Netflix is dead
Wifi Tether may be broke for now, Use the Internal version in settings

So unless you like to video record things, are addicted to Netflix, or use your phone as your WiFi router, this is almost certainly daily driver material. For additional details, head to the original thread.

emoji

We’ve all come across some weird looking characters on our phones while browsing Twitter, reading emails, or checking Facebook. They often appear as square shapes or blank spaces. Most of the time, these “glitches” are due to Emoji characters.

Emoji characters are an extensive set of icons or smilies, more commonly used by our dear friends, the iPhone users. The reason you don’t see them correctly on your Android device is because up until Android 4.1 Jelly Bean, Google had not implemented Emoji support in it’s mobile operating system.

For those running Ice Cream Sandwich, XDA Forum Moderator iridaki has come up with a fix to provide Emoji support just for you. The fix makes use of Android’s “fallback fonts.” Installations is through the usual method of flashing in recovery.

Though originally intended as a fix for Sony Xperia devices, iridaki has also provided simple fix for other Android devices, which consists of a simple xml file edit.

If you want to add Emoji support to your Ice Cream Sandwich device, check out the mod thread.

CaptivateGlide

The Samsung Captivate Glide is a Galaxy S II derivative on AT&T. Back in April when Samsung announced the list of carrier devices that would be receiving Android 4.0, the Glide made the cut. Since then there have been a few leaks, with not much being said from Samsung regarding an official release date.

After 5 months, Samsung has finally released the update via KIES.  In order to apply the update you will of course need to be on a stock, unrooted UCKI3 or UCKL1 ROM. The official information and instructions from Samsung can be found here.

While there is currently not a rooted version available from the talented developers in the Captivate Glide section, rest assured that it is coming soon. Until then, if you require a rooted ROM, then you should stick with what you have.

Sense41

It’s always good to see newer software gets ported to older devices with enough functionality to actually use. It can add new life to older devices and make them more tolerable for at least a little bit longer. Now, the HTC EVO 3D has a working Sense 4.1 port, and it comes not long after the official update to Ice Cream Sandwich.

XDA Senior Member chubbzlou is credited for having created the original port of the Sense 4.1 ROM to the device. From there, XDA Senior Member gruesomewolf turned it into a mean, lean, and mostly functional ROM. So far, the ROM seems to be very stable and usable as a daily driver. There are, however, some issues that still need to be worked out. The current issues include:

-3D
-4G (duh!)
-Effect in Gallery will FC
- For data roaming to work the data roaming widget must be turned on.
-Camera will FC if you choose any option but auto (I will fix this asap)
-Choosing smooth options in tweaks will cause a sense fc
[Link to a working Camera]

So yes, some kinks need to be worked out, but there’s nothing overly terrible or obtrusive. On the good side, there are a number of enhancements to boost performance, sound, and other parts of the ROM so users will have an overall decent experience.

If you’d like to know more, take a look at the original thread.

Acro S

Just a short time ago we brought you news that the Acro S was rooted. As the only Android phone out there that can swim, that’s great news. However, that is not all that developers had in store.

With the device rooted, developers could get started on creating the things that make XDA go ’round, including ROMs, kernels, hacks, mods, and others. As a result, the Sony Xperia Acro S now has CyanogenMod 9. Not impressed? Okay, it also received CyanogenMod 10 on the same day.

XDA Recognized Developer FXP, who regularly brings CM goodness to Xperia devices, released both builds. There are some issues with the unofficial CM10 build related to the camera, and the known issues on the CM9 build include:

Known issues being worked on:
* The recovery on first attempt fail to mount /system
* ALS is disabled (broke PowerManager)

To better keep track of issues, FXP has provided a bug tracker. Aside from the issues reported, users have predominantly good things to say. And for many, the ROMs can be used as daily drivers. For more info, check out the CM9 thread or the CM10 thread.

Galaxy S III

For those who love to receive updates to their mobile devices, the Telus, Bell and Rogers versions of the Samsung Galaxy S III (SGS-I747M) are currently getting a maintenance OTA update from Samsung.

The update purportedly brings improved stability, bug fixes, better battery life, and screen brightness adjustments available via the notification bar. The baseband is I747MVLLH1 with the OS Build being IMM76D.I747MVLALH1 (Android 4.0.4). There is currently no word on if the AT&T version will be receiving an OTA or not.

For those currently running a stock, unrooted ROM you should be receiving an OTA notification, but if not you can always check manually via Settings > About Device > Software Update. If you are running a rooted ROM then you will need to wait for a developer to package the update for you.

Head on over to the discussion thread to chime in or follow for the latest notifications.

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