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Posts Tagged: Android L

GMD immersive mode

Everyone likes screen real estate–no question about that. The sole idea of having more space available for your clutter of icons, widgets, and so on is what has fueled phone manufacturers to come up with screens so large that they barely fit in our pockets anymore. We do, however, always look for more, and one sure thing that many people could (and do) away with are the soft buttons (for devices with no hardware buttons) and the status bar.

There are apps such as video players and games that hide both the status bar and software navigation buttons while active. This is known as immersive mode. But while some apps offer immersive mode, not every app has this feature built in. Sure, there are a myriad of options out there to hide either bar (or both) using tools such as Xposed Framework, or even by simple build.prop manipulation. Several launchers such as Nova and Buzz even allow you to hide the status bar and bring it back out via gestures. However, all of the above (except the launchers of course) require root or custom ROMs. Well, XDA Senior Member StupidIdea is here to tell you that you no longer need root.

GMD Full Screen Immersive Mode is an app that automatically gets rid of either of the aforementioned bars, or both. This app is really a combination of some of StupidIdea’s previous works, many of which have been featured in the Portal over the past few years. As stated, the app does not require root and has the ability to hide either one of the bars, or both for the full immersive experience. GMD is actually quite simple to use, thanks to gesture controls that allow you to hide and reveal either bar through simple swipes. It also comes equipped with a notification in the status bar that allows you to switch back and forth. The app does have a few quirks such as how in order for the keyboard to work on certain apps, the Navigation bar must be present.

So, what are you waiting for? Get back every pixel that is rightfully yours by trying this app. Oh, and while you are at it, try and see if you can find any bugs within the app that the dev should know about. You can find more information in the GMD Full Screen Immersive Mode app thread.

Apollo Music Player

The recently unveiled Android L has changed quite a few things related to user experience, as well as some interface design nuances. Google presented its new design language, Material Design, which will soon replace the good old Holo in the majority of future applications.

Material Design is currently available only on Android L, and some lucky testers can try it out on the Google Nexus 5 and Google Nexus 7 (2013). Developers have quite a bit of homework to do, as apps will eventually need to be updated to the new design guidelines to match Android’s new look.

One of the first applications modified to match the new design guidelines is an unofficial Apollo Music Player build. It’s been adapted to Material Design thanks to XDA Senior Member TheXorg. HenryMP doesn’t differ much from the original player released by CyanogenMod team, but it looks really nice with the Developer Preview firmware, and shows off how this third-party music player may look in the Fall.

It’s unclear as to whether HenryMP will work with Android 4.4 KitKat or older releases. But due to issues we talked about earlier, it’s likely that this will only work with Android L.

If you are looking for a free music player that takes on Android L’s new look, HenryMP might be something that you are looking for. Give it a try by visiting the HenryMP application thread.

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Jordan0717

Live from New York, its the XDA News Update hosted by Jordan Keyes! Ok, so maybe it’s not live, but Jordan does review all the important stories from this week. Included in this week’s news is the announcement of the Nexus 5 receiving Android 4.4.4_R2 in selected countries and be sure the check out the announcement of the XDA Root Directory! That’s not all that’s covered in today’s video!

Jordan talks about the other videos released this week on  XDA Developer TV. XDA Developer TV Producer TK released an Xposed Tuesday video for Heads Up Notifications. Then, Jordan reviewed the LG G3. And later, TK gave us a an Android App Review of ShortPaste. Pull up a chair and check out this video.

READ ON »

Jordan0714

Android L Developer Preview has been ported to HTC One! That and much more news is covered by Jordan, as he reviews all the important stories from this weekend. Included in this weekend’s news is how Google may consider changing the SD Card access rules in final Android L and the story about enabling Chromecast mirroring from Any Device! That’s not all that’s covered in today’s video!

Be sure to check out the other videos released this week on XDA Developer TV. XDA Developer TV Producer TK released an Xposed Tuesday video for NotifyClean. Then, AdamOutler investigated Smartphone Charging. And later, TK gave us a an Android App Review of Notific. Pull up a chair and check out this video.

READ ON »

HTC One Android L Developer Preview

With each passing day, we grow closer and closer to the eventual release of Android L. We could just sit around, waiting for Google to release the source code and system images, but waiting for an official release is far from being fun. XDA members love porting fun, and custom ROM development provides the required dose.

The Android L port for the Google Nexus 4 was more or less expected, and came relatively shortly after Google released the developer preview images for the N5 and N7-2013. Not many expected to see a HTC One (M7) port, but XDA Senior Member ssrij and a team of developers managed to port the Android L Developer Preview to this former flagship device.

The port is still in alpha stage, and some things simply don’t work. Running Android L on first generation HTC One was made possible thanks to ramdisk and kernel modifications, so it might not run as it should. However, the Developer Preview was made to show people how the Android L will look like and what functions we should be expected.

If you own an HTC One and want to try out Android L on your phone, please visit the Android L for the HTC One port thread and give this port a try.

Android L quick settings

Quick–without thinking too much, come up with a short list of your five to ten favorite features found in custom ROMs. Chances are, one of these is the ability to customize your Quick Settings toggles. I’d even be willing to argue that for most people this is near or at the top of the list–aside from root access, of course.

Just two days ago, we talked about how Google was considering the possibility of changing the way external SD cards are handled in the final Android L release this Fall. Now, we have learned that Google is also contemplating adding a customizable Quick Settings interface in the final Android L release this Fall.

Just like the news on SD card handling, news of this possible feature addition comes courtesy of the Android L developer preview issue tracker. The initial request was made nine days ago, and it was then “Acknowledged” on the 4th and “Accepted” as “feature-16186589″ yesterday.

While no concrete information is available just yet regarding how this will be accomplished–or even if it will be added–it’s certainly encouraging to see a feature number attached to this user request. Would you like to see a customizable Quick Settings interface in the final Android L release, or does this feature not matter much to you? Let us know in the comments below.

[Source: Android L Developer Preview Issue Tracker | Via AndroidWorld.it]

Android L SD Card

With the release of Android 4.4 KitKat, Google introduced a few changes that impacted the way in which SD cards are handled. As a result, user-installed applications are not longer allowed to access the entirety of your SD card partition. Instead, user-installed apps running on KitKat are only given full access to files and folders of their own creation.

The change in SD card behavior in KitKat was a very deliberate one–and one which was aimed at improving both security and overall SD card tidiness. As you would expect from such a marked change, both users and third party applications were caught in the cross-fire and left with broken apps and support nightmares. Luckily for those looking to revert this behavior, there’s an easy workaround. But as you would imagine, this isn’t quite idea.

Now, there’s a glimmer of hope that a more ideal solution may be introduced into Android L when it is eventually released later this year. Earlier today, a report was filed on the Android L developer preview issue tracker that details one app developer’s concerns with the changes introduced into KitKat. The issue reads as follows:

In every Android version before 4.4, apps were allowed to (unofficially) write to the user’s external storage. Due to competitive pressures, users demanded this feature from app developers, whom were expected to provide this feature.

In Android 4.4, this was changed so that only system apps continued to have full access to the external storage, and other apps did not, unless they used new URI-based APIs.

My concerns:

  • I don’t see how these APIs are usable from Java or Native code that expects to work with Files, not URIs.
  • It places all 3rd-party app developers at a disadvantage versus system apps.
  • Users expect apps to offer them full access to the SD card, and are not asking for this restriction. This has been my experience based on user feedback.

I don’t currently see how the changes in L will improve this situation. Am I missing something? If the situation’s not as dire as I see it, perhaps Google can consider a migration guide so that it’s more obvious how to transition to the new APIs and provide the same feature set as the current java.io.File / POSIX File APIs?

Please reconsider restoring this access, even if tied to a new permission.

The issue was promptly marked as “Acknowledged” by an Android project team member, who later followed up by saying that this suggestion will be passed along to the development team.

Obviously, this in no way indicates that the SD card access rules will be changed once Android L is released in the Fall. After all, simply reverting the change in KitKat would be counterproductive for the vast majority of Android users. However, it does indicate that Google is willing to consider taking another look at the policy change–even if nothing can or will be done as a result.

Are you an app developer frustrated by the SD card access policy changes in KitKat? Are you a frustrated user tired of broken apps? Or are you pleased with the added security and order made possible by this change? Let us know in the comments below!

[Source: Android L Issue Tracker | Thanks to XDA Forum Member shree15 for the heads up!]

Jordan0707

Android L has been ported to the Nexus 4! That and much more news is covered by Jordan, as he reviews all the important stories from this weekend. Included in this weekend’s news is the announcement of OmniROM landing on the Sony Z Ultra GPe. And in other porting news, the Jolla Phone Launcher has been ported to Android devices! That’s not all that’s covered in today’s video!

Be sure to check out the other videos released this week on XDA Developer TV. XDA Developer TV Producer TK released an Xposed Tuesday video for Deep Sleep Battery Saver. Then, TK reviewed the Sony Xperia X2. And later, TK gave us a an Android App Review of QuickClick. Pull up a chair and check out this video.

READ ON »

Android L for the Nexus 4

 

During the I/O 2014 keynote, Google unveiled Android L. Shortly thereafter, the Developer Preview was released for the Nexus 5 and Nexus 7 2013, leaving owners of other Nexus devices with just screenshots and second hand impressions. Then, a glimmer of hope came as Google released the GPL mandated code for currently supported Nexus devices. All eyes then turned towards the development community. Would they come through with a port?

Sure enough, expectations were met and XDA Senior Members sykopompos and defconoi came through with a port of the L-Preview for the Nexus 4. This was accomplished after many hours of hard work, along with help from Retired Recognized Developer ben1066 and Senior Member percy_g2 to fix the inevitable bugs that were produced. Now, the end result is a daily driver-capable ROM that mako users can be proud to use without too much hassle.

Head on over to the original thread to download the ROM. Just keep in mind that this is still a very early release, so there may be a few bugs that haven’t yet been discovered.

Jordan0704

Android 4.4.4 roadmap from HTC for their device updates has been leaked! That and much more news is covered by Jordan, as he reviews all the important stories from this week. Included in this week’s news is the announcement of SuperSU being updated to root Android L developer preview. Also be sure the check out the story talking about what the Android L developer preview really is and what it all means! That’s not all that’s covered in today’s video!

Jordan talks about the other videos released this week on XDA Developer TV. XDA Developer TV Producer TK released an Xposed Tuesday video for Deep Sleep Battery Saver. Then, TK reviewed the Sony Xperia X2. And later, TK gave us a an Android App Review of QuickClick. Pull up a chair and check out this video.

READ ON »

android l aosp changelog

It’s been just one week since Google introduced Android L to the world at the Google I/O 2014 opening keynote. In the time since, we’ve gotten our hands on the developer preview release and even managed to root it. Then in a surprising move, Google decided to open source part of the Android L codebase in limited capacity.

We don’t yet have the complete L source code, and likely won’t until its official release in the Fall. However, the fine folks over at FunkyAndroid have done what they do best by listing out every code commit available in the recently open sourced component of the Android L developer preview.

The FunkyAndroid team has already given us developer changelogs for Android 4.4.14.4.2,4.4.2_r2, 4.4.3, and 4.4.4. Now, they’ve gone ahead and given us yet another developer changelog for the open source components of the Android L developer preview. As always, this service is made possible thanks to an open source script released by none other than former AOSP lead JBQ.

In a change from usual operating procedures, today’s changelog comes in two forms: a version with chromium-related changes and a version without. The former racks in about 60k commits, while the latter roughly halves that. However, it’s important to keep in mind that this list only looks at the partial source code that was made available two days ago. As such, not every change has made it into this list, and there are even potentially changes in this list that aren’t in the developer preview images.

[Thanks to everyone who sent this in!]

device-2014-07-03-024230

Unquestionably, many have grown to like Android L since its official unveiling. Since then, we’ve seen users come up with random application ports, ringtones, and other goodies from Google’s latest work in progress OS. We are all waiting for the official release, so why not give our current OS builds some of L’s graphical style?

Not too long ago, we talked about a theme that changes your UI to look like that in Android L. Unfortunately, however, this only works on ROMs with CyanogenMod’s new theme engine installed. Now, everyone can try Android L’s look on their devices.

XDA Forum Member Adhi1419 made this possible using Xposed Framework. The module themes pretty much everything, including statusbar icons, settings, calculator, ringtones, and so on. Some users reported issues with non-CyanogenMod ROMs, but hopefully they will be fixed soon.

Are you tired of your current Jelly Bean or KitKat look? If so, visit the original thread to change your theme right away.

Android L Developer Preview Source Code in the AOSP

Update: As pointed out by XDA Forum Member a3361035 in the comments below, this isn’t a complete release just yet. Rather, these are just a few GPL projects for the L-Preview release, and not a full platform update.

__

As we mentioned earlier today, the Android L Developer Preview is exactly that–a developer preview. However, many users understandably want to taste the future of Android today. As such, quite a few Nexus 5 and 7 owners have ventured to install the Android L Developer Preview firmware images on their daily driver devices.

Unfortunately, not every one happens to own a hammerhead or flo. But now, as a surprise to many, Google has pushed the Android L Developer Preview source code to the AOSP under the “android-l” branch. Device-specific support is available for the Nexus 4 (lge/mako), Nexus 5 (lge/hammerhead), Nexus 7 2012 WiFi (asus/grouper), Nexus 7 2012 Mobile Data (asus/tilapia), Nexus 7 2013 WiFi (asus/deb), Nexus 7 2013 Mobile Data (asus/flo), and Nexus 10 (samsung/manta).

While these files were most likely released in order to help OEMs and third party developers begin preparing for L’s release, they will also enable custom ROM developers to build Android L releases for their devices of choice. But naturally, building for unsupported devices will be more difficult due to the lack of L-enabled proprietary binaries and device trees. As these source files are only for a few GPL projects and not the entire L-Preview AOSP source, this isn’t of benefit to ROM developers just yet. However, those wishing to learn more about the L preview may find use in the code.

Developers, head over to the AOSP to peer into the code. From there, all the relevant code will be available in the relevant subfolders with the “android-l” branch. ROM developers looking for device-specific files can find the goods in the appropriate links below:

[Many thanks to XDA Recognized Contributor ryukiri and everyone else who sent this in!]

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