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Posts Tagged: Android L

Jordan0704

Android 4.4.4 roadmap from HTC for their device updates has been leaked! That and much more news is covered by Jordan, as he reviews all the important stories from this week. Included in this week’s news is the announcement of SuperSU being updated to root Android L developer preview. Also be sure the check out the story talking about what the Android L developer preview really is and what it all means! That’s not all that’s covered in today’s video!

Jordan talks about the other videos released this week on XDA Developer TV. XDA Developer TV Producer TK released an Xposed Tuesday video for Deep Sleep Battery Saver. Then, TK reviewed the Sony Xperia X2. And later, TK gave us a an Android App Review of QuickClick. Pull up a chair and check out this video.

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android l aosp changelog

It’s been just one week since Google introduced Android L to the world at the Google I/O 2014 opening keynote. In the time since, we’ve gotten our hands on the developer preview release and even managed to root it. Then in a surprising move, Google decided to open source part of the Android L codebase in limited capacity.

We don’t yet have the complete L source code, and likely won’t until its official release in the Fall. However, the fine folks over at FunkyAndroid have done what they do best by listing out every code commit available in the recently open sourced component of the Android L developer preview.

The FunkyAndroid team has already given us developer changelogs for Android 4.4.14.4.2,4.4.2_r2, 4.4.3, and 4.4.4. Now, they’ve gone ahead and given us yet another developer changelog for the open source components of the Android L developer preview. As always, this service is made possible thanks to an open source script released by none other than former AOSP lead JBQ.

In a change from usual operating procedures, today’s changelog comes in two forms: a version with chromium-related changes and a version without. The former racks in about 60k commits, while the latter roughly halves that. However, it’s important to keep in mind that this list only looks at the partial source code that was made available two days ago. As such, not every change has made it into this list, and there are even potentially changes in this list that aren’t in the developer preview images.

[Thanks to everyone who sent this in!]

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Unquestionably, many have grown to like Android L since its official unveiling. Since then, we’ve seen users come up with random application ports, ringtones, and other goodies from Google’s latest work in progress OS. We are all waiting for the official release, so why not give our current OS builds some of L’s graphical style?

Not too long ago, we talked about a theme that changes your UI to look like that in Android L. Unfortunately, however, this only works on ROMs with CyanogenMod’s new theme engine installed. Now, everyone can try Android L’s look on their devices.

XDA Forum Member Adhi1419 made this possible using Xposed Framework. The module themes pretty much everything, including statusbar icons, settings, calculator, ringtones, and so on. Some users reported issues with non-CyanogenMod ROMs, but hopefully they will be fixed soon.

Are you tired of your current Jelly Bean or KitKat look? If so, visit the original thread to change your theme right away.

Android L Developer Preview Source Code in the AOSP

Update: As pointed out by XDA Forum Member a3361035 in the comments below, this isn’t a complete release just yet. Rather, these are just a few GPL projects for the L-Preview release, and not a full platform update.

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As we mentioned earlier today, the Android L Developer Preview is exactly that–a developer preview. However, many users understandably want to taste the future of Android today. As such, quite a few Nexus 5 and 7 owners have ventured to install the Android L Developer Preview firmware images on their daily driver devices.

Unfortunately, not every one happens to own a hammerhead or flo. But now, as a surprise to many, Google has pushed the Android L Developer Preview source code to the AOSP under the “android-l” branch. Device-specific support is available for the Nexus 4 (lge/mako), Nexus 5 (lge/hammerhead), Nexus 7 2012 WiFi (asus/grouper), Nexus 7 2012 Mobile Data (asus/tilapia), Nexus 7 2013 WiFi (asus/deb), Nexus 7 2013 Mobile Data (asus/flo), and Nexus 10 (samsung/manta).

While these files were most likely released in order to help OEMs and third party developers begin preparing for L’s release, they will also enable custom ROM developers to build Android L releases for their devices of choice. But naturally, building for unsupported devices will be more difficult due to the lack of L-enabled proprietary binaries and device trees. As these source files are only for a few GPL projects and not the entire L-Preview AOSP source, this isn’t of benefit to ROM developers just yet. However, those wishing to learn more about the L preview may find use in the code.

Developers, head over to the AOSP to peer into the code. From there, all the relevant code will be available in the relevant subfolders with the “android-l” branch. ROM developers looking for device-specific files can find the goods in the appropriate links below:

[Many thanks to XDA Recognized Contributor ryukiri and everyone else who sent this in!]

Android L Developer Preview SDK

Android L Developer Preview SDK

During the Google I/O 2014 opening keynote, we caught our first glimpses of the radically different Android L. And when Google made an early developer preview available, many end users went ahead and installed L on their own devices. Unfortunately though, intrepid users were quick to find that the developer preview didn’t feature all of the UI goodies that we saw in the Android Design Guidelines and event keynote.

While part of the disconnect between expected and actualized features is due to the incomplete nature of the developer preview, an even larger part boils down to the lack of application support for Android’s new UI paradigm, Material Design. So we should all urge our favorite app developers to get with the program and update their apps, right? Wrong.

Alongside the release of the Android L Developer Preview images, Google also released the Android L Preview SDK. Using the L Preview SDK, developers are now able to make use of Theme.Material.* and give their applications this highly sought after theme. And in fact, this is only available when using the preview SDK. However, Google makes it very clear that applications created with the preview SDK should not be published to the Google Play Store:

The L Developer Preview gives you an advance look at the upcoming release for the Android platform, which offers new features for users and app developers. This document provides an introduction to the most notable APIs.

The L Developer Preview is intended for developer early adopters and testers. If you are interested in influencing the direction of the Android framework, give the L Developer Preview a try and send us your feedback!

Caution: Do not not publish apps that use the L Developer Preview to the Google Play store.

What’s more, users not running Android L can’t even install applications created using the L Preview SDK, even when the application is created with minSDK set to something lower than what’s supported by the target device:

DX5KPsl

So where are we going with all of this? We should stop harassing our favorite app developers to update their applications to Material Design. This is because the Material Design theme is only available using the L Preview SDK, and applications built using it can’t be uploaded to the Play Store. So let’s give our developers a break  and let them use the Android L Preview SDK the way it’s meant to be used: as a way to get their applications ready for when Android L is released in the fall, rather than to create shipping applications now.

[Via Daniel Velazco]

Android L Rooted

Last week during the Google I/O 2014 opening keynote, Google unveiled the much anticipated and radically different Android L release. The very next day, Google made an early developer preview available for users to get an early taste of what L will eventually be like.

Many end users rocking the Google Nexus 5 or 7 ended up flashing this update, and this in turn lead users to want to root the update. But unfortunately, SuperSU was not yet compatible with Android L Dev Preview, so a workaround with a pre-rooted boot.img was necessary. Now, however, XDA Senior Recognized Developer Chainfire has returned from I/O and presents a new version of SuperSU that is able to handle the L developer Preview. And coming in at version 2.01, this latest update primarily brings support for the L developer preview.

As we talked about in the past, the Android L Developer Preview brings two changes that affect root applications: PIE and execution restriction for files stored on the /data partition. Curiously,  /system writes are still possible because the recovery context is still present in the L preview. However, it’s highly likely that this, as well as all of the other commits identified by Chainfire in the above linked articles, will be implemented by the time L is formally released.

If you wish to get in on the L Dev Preview root action, head over to the application thread and give the latest version of SuperSU a shot. And if you wish to learn more about this update and read Chainfire’s take on the changes and how they affect root apps, head over to his release notes on Google+.

Please note that if you rooted with the previous method and now wish to use SuperSU 2.01, you should make sure that you restore your original boot.img (or simply reflash the entire developer image) first.

Jordan0630

Android L developer preview for the Nexus 5 and Nexus 7 (2013) can now be rooted! That and much more news is covered by Jordan, as he reviews all the important stories from this weekend. Included in this weekend’s news is Android 4.4.4 hitting more Google Play edition devices and there is an article about how the Nexus line is not going away! That’s not all that’s covered in today’s video!

Be sure the check out the other videos released this week on XDA Developer TV. XDA Developer TV Producer TK released an Xposed Tuesday video for MinMinLock. Then, Adam did an XDA Unboxing of the ASUS PadFone X. Finally, TK gave us a an Android App Review of WiFi Scheduler. Pull up a chair and check out this video.

READ ON »

image

Android L is a big thing. And in many ways, it’s perhaps the biggest release since Ice Cream Sandwich, as it brings tons of new API and end user changes under the hood. Android L is already available to download as a developer preview for Nexus 5 and Nexus 7 (2013) users, and it should be ready for the public in the Fall. But in the meantime, you can enjoy bits and pieces from the developer preview ported to other devices with KitKat, Jelly Bean, and so on.

If you took a look at L screenshots, you undoubtedly noticed its changes to the navigation bar. It was redesigned to match the new Material design. Thanks to Xposed Framework and XDA Senior Member prithvee, you can now try the Android L’s navigation bar on your device. The module changes the look of the “standard” Android 4.0+ navigation bar to look like L’s modified offering.

The module is very simple and has no configuration options. To use it on your device, simply install the APK, enable it in Xposed, and reboot your device. The changes should be visible right away if you are running Android 4.0 or newer. Just be sure that you have Xposed Framework installed and properly configured.

To try out more goodies from the upcoming Android L, visit the module thread.

HTC Android L Update roadmap

While quite a few of us here on XDA have long since forgotten about OEM firmwares and updates in favor of aftermarket development efforts, many still prefer the additional value-added features found in stock-based ROMs. And for those who remain on stock or stock-derived firmware, it’s always nice to have an idea about upcoming Android releases.

Thanks to famed leaker and XDA Recognized Contributor llabtoofer, we now have a better idea of HTC’s upcoming update roadmap for several devices including the HTC One M8 (2014), One (M7), One Max, One Mini, and more. According to the leak, Android 4.4.3 + Sense 6, which was previously slated to hit the M7 and M8 will likely be skipped in favor of going straight to Android 4.4.4 + Sense 6. This update will likely hit these devices between July and August. It is also set to hit devices that were not set to receive the 4.4.3+ Sense 6 update such as the One E8 (M8_Ace), One Mini 2 (Mem), and One Dual SIM (M8_DUGL) between August and September.

Although the M7 will receive the update love, the Android 4.4.3/4 + Sense 6 update isn’t slated to hit older One variants, the Butterfly S, or Desire 816 and 610. However, Android L has not yet been ruled out for any of these devices, and evaluation will take place once source is released, which will likely be between October and December of this year. And once that happens, we already know that HTC intends on bringing L to all consumer M7 and M8 variants within 90 days.

You can learn more by heading over to Llabtoofer’s site or clicking on the screenshot to your right. What are your thoughts on HTC’s leaked update roadmap? Are you disappointed that several of these relatively recent devices likely won’t see an official update to 4.4.4? Let us know your thoughts in the comments below.

[Thanks to XDA Portal Supporter Titokhan and Senior member dd98 for the tip!]

Android L CM11 Theme

This past week was quite a frenzy for Android fans, with Google I/O bringing a number of announcements regarding Android and its expansion to our wrists, cars, and living rooms. Perhaps the most significant was Google’s unveiling of Android L. The L release is slated to bring a rather significant departure in the Android UI, taking us from transitioning from Holo (first seen in Android 3.0 Honeycomb) to the new Material Design.

The Android L Developer Preview was launched for the Nexus 5 or a Nexus 7 (2013) last week. But while the rest of us twiddle our thumbs in anticipation of its launch in the Fall, there are some things we can do to give our device the L look, such as installing the apps extracted from the L system dump.

If that isn’t enough, XDA Member PixCM has gone ahead and assembled an Android L theme. This theme, which is compatible with the CM11 Theme engine, completes the Android L look with the new boot animation, font, wallpapers, system bars, ringtones, icons and lots more.

Head on over to the theme thread to get started, and stay updated about Android L news by following our coverage.

53ab099dee15d_android

Over the last few days, most of our news has been related to Android L. This upcoming upgrade is quite a big deal for all Android users. The Developer Preview has already been launched for Nexus 5 and 7 (2013), allowing users of those two devices to test drive the new OS a bit early. However, not everyone owns a Nexus 5 or 7.

Since most of us can’t wait for its official release, XDA Senior Member ivan123 posted a full system dump with wallpapers, fonts, ringtones, boot animation, and of course built-in applications from Android L. All files can be downloaded as a bundle or individually, so it’s up to you to decide what suits you most. Some apps are already proven to work with KitKat or Jelly Bean, while others (such as Chrome and Google Earth) still have problems and force close.

If you’re looking for some of the L goodies, head over to the original thread and give these files a shot. And if you want to learn more about Android L, check out its continuing coverage here on the XDA Portal.

Jordan0627

Android L developer preview is available for the Nexus 5 and Nexus 7(2013)! That and much more news is covered by Jordan, as he reviews all the important stories from this week. Included in this week’s news is the announcement of Android L and what interface changes it has in store, and there is an article about Nokia’s new X2 Android phone! That’s not all that’s covered in today’s video!

Be sure the check out the other videos released this week on XDA Developer TV. XDA Developer TV Producer TK released an Xposed Tuesday video for MinMinLock. Then, Adam did an XDA Unboxing of the ASUS PadFone X. And later, TK gave us a an Android App Review of WiFi Scheduler. Pull up a chair and check out this video.

READ ON »

Android L Developer Preview Rooted

Are you running the Android L Developer Preview? If so, your day’s about to get a little bit sweeter! This test firmware was released for the Nexus 5 and Nexus 7 (2013) yesterday. And in the time since, we’ve put it through its paces to see just how far Google has come in releasing this new test firmware. But do you know what else has been accomplished since then? Yep, you guessed it. Root has been achieved.

If you’re running the L Developer Preview and you’ve been dying for root access, you can now get your fix in thanks to XDA Recognized Developer savoca, who rooted the test firmwares and shared how to do so within just a couple hours of the L Developer Preview release.

The root procedure is fairly easy, but there are a few prerequisites. First, you’ll need to have a custom recovery installed. So after installing the L developer preview, go ahead and flash the latest version of your custom recovery of choice. Then, flash Chainfire’s SuperSU. Finally, head to your device’s bootloader and fastboot flash the appropriate boot.img for your device.

Users will be quick to note that root access doesn’t quite work as it did in the past with regards to system write access. This seems to be due to the previous root app breakage originally described by Chainfire with regards to the need for new security contexts. This is why certain apps can write to /system and others cannot.

What are you waiting for? If you’re running Android L Dev Preview on your Nexus 5 or Nexus 7, head over to this post to get your root on!

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