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Posts Tagged: API

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Our international xda:devcon ’14 in Manchester, UK on the weekend of September 26-28 is a celebration of all things mobile. The most popular sect of mobile development is perhaps software development. There are many different ways to develop software. You can use libraries and APIs to help advance your skills, among other things.

Today, we are happy to announce another great speaker that will be at xda:devcon ’14. MaR-V-iN is a computer science student, privacy enthusiast and hacker. MaR-V-iN started coding for Android at the end of Gingerbread era. Since then contributed to numerous Free Open Source Software projects. He is a big fan of penguins around him.

This year, MaR-V-iN’s presentation will be about which APIs are missing on non-Google systems, how they work, with specific focus on Play Services and what developers should do about it. Entitled “The Google in Android™,” this presentation talks about how since the first release of Android, Google has been an integral part of Android. At Android’s beginning, most apps by Google were just standard apps and use was not forced. More recently, however, Google started providing APIs through these apps. Since the rollout of alternative AOSP distributions, Google increasingly provides APIs through “Google Play Services” and the corresponding library. While Google claims that they’re combating fragmentation between Android versions this way, they’re in fact targeting fragmentation between Android and alternative AOSP distributions. So check out this talk to learn more about Google’s APIs, this is the talk for you.

Join us September 26 to 28 in Manchester for XDA:DevCon 2014. Register to attend using this link for exclusive savings. Hurry, as the Early Bird registration ends August 1st.

xperia sp illumination

Further testament to Sony’s increasing support for third-party developers comes with their release of ‘experimental’ APIs for that funky translucent illumination bar found on many of their phones such as the Xperia S. The new APIs will allow developers to play and experiment with the bar’s functionality in various situations, apps, and ROMs.

Announced at Sony’s Developer World, the APIs will allow developers to control the bar in unrestricted ways never before possible, such as setting the LED color, controlling the LED pulses, and define fading patterns. The devices that are fully supported by the APIs are the:

The following phones are also supported, however support for the fading patterns will not be as extensive:

Developers of the Xperia S and P should also be mindful that the hardware only supports white color, and this limitation may be found on other devices.

These new APIs also mark the introduction of ‘experimental’ APIs from Sony, and will most likely be for ‘playful’ and novel features of the Xperia lineup. So if you own one of the supported devices and would like to check out just exactly what the illumination bar can do, be sure to visit Sony’s announcement for more information and download.

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Pssst… over here. Yeah, did you know about the Hidden Android Classes? Shhh… it’s a secret. They let you do stuff you otherwise couldn’t. You can read internal data, like the text message database stored on a phone. You can also gain lower level access to the hardware in order to extend your app’s access to things like the touchscreen input values, or WiFi radio usage. To get your hands on that kind of contraband, you’ll need to do some poking around in the Android SDK, and make a few… changes… to the way your Eclipse ADT plugin works.

This information comes to our attention because XDA Recognized Developer E:V:A bumped his own post out of year-old obscurity, but boy are we glad he did. If you like to do things you’re not supposed to, it’ll be worth your time to read the guide. Head on over to his original thread for full details.

E:V:A’s work boils down the avalanche of information on the subject which was posted by Inazaruk a couple of years ago. The Java classes that are known synonymously as Hidden or Internal Classes are protected from direct use and hidden from being shown in the Java docs (using the @hide directive). Using them is just a matter of hacking the android.jar file and tweaking your IDE setup to stop blocking your path to the forbidden fruit.

One thing I think Inazaruk and E:V:A both missed was a simple explanation of possible applications for the hidden classes. Read more about that in this article.

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