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Posts Tagged: app development

example

One week ago, we featured a guide by XDA Senior Member marty331 posted in our App Development forums aimed at helping application developers create in-app usage tutorials using transparent demo overlays atop application activities. However, not everybody is a designer able to create aesthetically appealing overlays. Luckily, XDA Senior Member nikwen discovered the open source ShowcaseView library by Alex Curran, which makes it easy to generate Holo-themed demo overlays with ease.

In addition to describing the Apache 2-licensed library, nikwen also put together a quick guide that teaches developers how to showcase views, views in fragments, and parts of the action bar. He also describes how to add listeners to the library to trigger the event, as well as add animations such as a virtual finger that performs a gesture.

As we stated before, one of the keys to getting users comfortable and happy with your application is to show them how to use it. Head over to the guide thread to get started.

new-project

Recently, we’ve been talking quite a bit about the Android Studio IDE. Launched originally at Google I/O 2013, Android Studio aims at replacing Eclipse + Android Developer Tools, and bringing a few niceties such as live code rendering for different layouts.

As with any big change, some developers have experienced a few growing pains ranging from differences in handling external libraries to pains during initial setup. Aside from problems, just learning a new way of doing things can also be a hassle. Luckily, XDA Forum Member JoshieGeek has a guide in our App Development Forums geared at helping developers make the move to Android Studio.

The guide begins by giving a brief overview of the IDE, as well as pros and cons when making the switch. Then, JoshieGeek covers installation across three platforms (Linux, Mac, and Windows), as well as creating your first project. Next, he covers the differences in exploring your project when compared to Eclipse, as well as how to view your app in different layouts. Finally, the guide covers how to generate a signed APK.

Head over to the guide thread to get started. Alternatively, this guide has also been incorporated into our XDA-University project. You can view its XDA-U page here.

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In our continuing coverage of the App Development forums here at XDA, we’ve featured various open source libraries that  enable you to quickly add in functionality into your app-in-progress without having to reinvent the wheel. These libraries have streamlined app development in topics ranging from UI design and data visualization  to application updates and everything in between.

Now, thanks to XDA Senior Member klinkdawg, there is an open source library for SMS and MMS messaging. After gaining knowledge while creating his own messaging app, klinkdawg released his library with the intention of helping other developers create their own SMS and MMS apps.

In addition to simply sharing the code, the developer has also written a brief guide in the thread that should cover basic usage. Currently, Google Voice is not supported, but that is on the way in a future revision. Additionally, this library is in beta, and uses non-final APIs.

Despite the beta status, this library could be of use if you’ve been planning on adding text messaging to your app. Head over to the library thread and knlinkdawg’s Github to get started.

which-build-gradle

We’ve written about Android Studio a few times in the past. Google’s would-be replacement for Android Developer Tools first made its appearance at Google I/O 2013. Based on Jetbrains IntelliJ, Android Studio offers many benefits over the older ADT such as live code rendering to see how your app will look across a variety of devices and layouts, as well as the ability to easily add any Android API into your app’s code. However, the transition hasn’t been without its share of growing pains.

One such issue that has popped up isn’t an issue per se, but rather a difference in how things are done. Since Android Studio is based on Gradle-build, the way it references external libraries (such as Google Play Services) is a bit different. Luckily, XDA Forum Member JoshieGeek has already gone through the process of learning how this is done, and has shared it in our App Development forums.

If you’re a developer looking to make the switch to Android Studio but you’ve either held back due differences in external library support or have just been waiting for the growing pains to subside, JoshieGeek’s guide will likely be of use. Make your way over to the tutorial thread to get started.

ss-main-window

Are you a developer using Mono for Android to develop pseudo-cross platform code using C# or .Net? If so, you may wish to save a few keystrokes for commonly executed commands.

XDA Senior Member ScatteredHell has created a DLL that works with Mono for Android to execute various commands. Originally, it supported obtaining system uptime, as well as some commonly used root-level commands such as mounting and unmounting the system as Read/Write and Read-Only, Rebooting, Setting Permissions, and Playing a Boot Animation. Now in its second version, it adds Get Date, Get Time, and Get Folders in a Specified Path to the list of supported commands. Example code is also given in the thread, demonstrating its usage.

While these shortcuts won’t save you massive amounts of time, the shortcuts will add up over time. Head over to the original thread to get started and streamline your Mono usage.

The Smart Way to Price Your Mobile App THumbnail2

There are a lot of free apps in the Google Play store. If that’s true, how do developers make money for their hard work? Banner Ads? Freemium? Begging? What if I make a break for the pack and charge for my app. How do I pick what to charge?

In today’s video, Jayce talks about choosing the price for your mobile app smartly. He talks about the history of software pricing. Jayce gives some great information from across the web. Links to these stories are below. Check out this video to see what he has to say.

READ ON »

Activity_overlay

We’ve all seen those in-app usage tutorials before. You know, I’m talking about the ones that use transparency to show you what the app’s buttons do, or how you go about accomplishing a certain task. It’s just good practice to show your users upon first launch how to use your app, and since most people learn best by example, walking them through visually with an in-app usage tutorial is optimal.

After learning how to add an in-app demo to his own app, XDA Senior Member marty331 decided to create a guide in our App Development forums detailing exactly how he went about doing it. He starts with creating a transparent PNG at a recommended size and then continues by showing you how to create an XML layout to display the image, as well as deciding when to show it.

Head over to the tutorial thread to get started showing users how to use your app. All of the code is available in the thread, as well as on his Github.

How To Choose a Killer App Idea Thumbnail2

Everyone has an idea for the next killer app. However, these ideas are often like armpits: Everyone has one, and they all stink. Yet, there are ways to think about the needs of the market and make an app to fill them. But how can you come up with a killer app idea?

In today’s video, Jayce talks about choosing a killer app idea. He talks about how to look at the market and evaluate what’s already done and what is not. Jayce gives some great information for people looking to create the next killer app. Check out this video to see what he has to say.

READ ON »

device_dialog_small

Think back to all those times when your non-tech savvy parents have called you over for free computer tech support. What’s one unifying theme from all of these instances? If your loved ones are anything like mine, it’s a horde of uninstalled updates awaiting approval. This is unfortunately all too common, as most of the technologically illiterate simply ignore update notifications, without realizing that these updates often patch vulnerabilities and add important features.

Luckily on Android, updates can be set to automatically install if the app’s permissions haven’t changed. However, not everyone has auto-update enabled, and even those with the option enabled may not take the time to manually update applications with changed permissions in the app manifest. In these instances, users need a little bit of prodding to get them to be a man and do the right thing—update their applications.

As a developer, not having users on the latest version of your app can be problematic. After all, who wants users complaining about broken features that have already been fixed two versions ago? Thankfully, XDA Senior Member rampo created a library to help with this problem in your own app. So how does the library work? Simple. UpdateChecker is a class that when called checks to see if the app is updated to the latest version available in the Play Store by parsing your app’s desktop Play Store listing. If there is a newer version available, the user is then prompted to update.

Head over to the library thread to prod your users to update.

How Non-Coders Created a Hugely Successful App Thumbnail1

There is a secret in the app development world. Everyone thinks that the only people who are able to make any money in app development are people who know code. Guess what—that’s not always the case. Sometimes, someone with vision can take an app or an idea and turn in into the next hot app.

In today’s video, Jayce talks about how non-coders created a hugely successful app. He talks about how Prerna Gupta and Parag Chordia as non-developers made their mark. If non-developers can do it, maybe you can as well. Check out this video to see what he has to say.

READ ON »

kl6CA4N

If you’ve ever thought about building a mobile application but put these dreams aside for whatever reason, now’s the time to get started. And with over a million new device activations per day, the mobile platform that will give you the most potential reach is clearly the Android OS.

So how do you go about building your first Android application? Well, that’s where XDA Senior Member Nachiket.Namjoshi is hoping to chime in with his tutorial thread. The guide is aimed at individuals just getting started with Android app development, but who have some experience with object oriented programming, Java, and Eclipse.

Nachiket.Namjoshi’s guide walks you through initial setup of an Eclipse-based development environment on Windows, as well as the Android SDK, Android Developer Tools (ADT), and the JDK. Once you have the prerequisites installed, the guide defines some of the fundamental staples of Android apps, including activities, services, content providers, broadcast receivers, as well as how to declare permissions and a minimum API level in the AndroidManifest.xml file. After the explanations, the guide shows you how to create activities and intents, as well as how to call them.

Budding application developers, be sure to head over to the tutorial thread to get started.

New Developers Greatest Opportunity Thumbnail1

Many people in the first world take the Internet and computers for granted. However, other countries are coming online and they are jumping right to mobile and smartphone devices. Could this be a good opportunity for developers? Why should you care about the next 2 billion people coming on the Internet?

In today’s video, Jayce talks about how the next billion people to come online are the next market for developers. He talks about how developers can seize this opportunity. He talks about a couple articles that are linked below. Check out this video to see what he has to say.

READ ON »

attributedocs

Back at Google I/O 2013, Android Studio was released in beta form. The tool, which was released with the help of Jetbrains and based on IntelliJ, featured various “killer features” such as live rendering of your code and the ability to easily add any API into your code.

Since then, we’ve talked a little about it, including troubleshooting tips for setup and a graphing library compatible with the tool. Now, version 0.2.4 has been released, bringing with it several key improvements, including:

  • XML attribute documentation
  • The ability to jump between a layout and its associated activity
  • The ability to create missing onClick handlers
  • Improvements to the Gradle synchronization
  • Improvements to layout editing and various bugfixes

To get your Android Studio updated, you simply have to restart it or manually check for updates (Help -> Check for Updates). To learn more about exactly what was changed, head over to the Android Tools Project Site.

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