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Posts Tagged: AROMA

qeshZRM

Few tools have made ROM installation and customization easier than AROMA Installer by XDA Recognized Developer amarullz. Rather than installing a preconfigured package, AROMA allows users to pick and choose what parts to install and/or what parameters to set.

If you’re a developer looking to incorporate AROMA installer into your flashable ZIPs, there are plenty of guides that we’ve featured to help you do so. However, those looking for an automated method should check out AROMA Zip Maker by XDA Senior Member DC07.

AROMA Zip Maker does what its name states by converting simple flashable ZIPs to AROMA Installer format. This allows you to easily add themes, change logs, and thanks pages to your flashable ZIP. Naturally, you won’t inherently gain the customization options by using this converter. But this is where the aforementioned guides come into play.

If you want an easy entry into the world of AROMA, head over to the original thread to get started.

roboto_font

One of the simplest ways of giving your Android interface a new and refreshed look is to change the default font. Achieving this is easy, as all that’s required is switching the .ttf files in one of the system directories, hence the abundance of third-party apps in the Play Store requiring root access. And if you’re a user of one of the few ROMs that can change fonts for you, well, all the better!

But for those who are not running ROMs with this function, or who are aware of the possibilities of bootloops and other unpleasant issues from using a third-party app, you may want to check out XDA Senior Member xminirom’s FontFly AROMA package. FontFly is essentially an AROMA mod pack that houses a myriad different fonts that you can flash onto your device. There are 134 fonts in all.

Because of this large collection, xminirom splits FontFly into two parts to prevent the AROMA package from taking up too much space on your device’s storage. This also makes it significantly easier to find the font you’re looking for. And if you’re worried about not recognizing any of the confusing font names, there’s no need, as FontFly displays a preview of the font in AROMA itself.

If you’re interested in finding out more about FontFly, or have any questions to ask, head over to the original thread for more information.

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running android

Smartphones are pretty high maintenance devices. No matter how impressive the spec sheets are, the phone in your hand will inevitably get cluttered and unkempt with daily use, personalization, customization, and modifications. This is why it’s a good idea to have a ‘spring cleaning’ of sorts every once in a while, just to refresh your device.

So for Sony Xperia SP users looking to do so, Speedy Droid may be of interest. Developed by XDA Recognized Developer Divaksh, Speedy Droid is a tool that performs a variety of actions intended to refresh your device as well as a bit more. Running on XDA Recognized Developer amarullz‘s AROMA installer, Speedy Droid removes bloatware apps and features from stock-derived Sony ROMs (handy after a flash), backs up and restores things like settings and messages, and much more.

Conveniently, Speedy Droid creates backups of apps you’ve chosen to remove, just in case you find yourself regretting your decision and wanting to restore the removed apps. There are two modes, a ‘super’ mode that can be assumed to remove all bloatware apps and features, and and a ‘custom’ mode for those who prefer a bit more flexibility. All this is packed into a neat 5 MB zip file to be flashed via a custom recovery.

So if you own an Xperia SP and would like to give this a go, visit the original thread for more information.

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Ever since XDA Recognized Developer amarullz created the AROMA installer, we’ve seen it used in quite a variety of ways. One of the first proofs of concept was the constantly evolving AROMA File Manager by amarullz himself. We’ve also seen it used for ROM and kernel customization, toolkits, debloating utilities, and much more.

The widespread use of AROMA installer should come as no surprise. After all, the installer is both versatile and user friendly. So naturally, quite a few developers have adopted it into their own development work, making it their delivery method of choice. However, getting up and running with AROMA is understandably more difficult than creating a simple updater-script. But if the only thing holding you back from incorporating AROMA installer into your flashable files, XDA Senior Member Ayush Singh has a comprehensive guide aimed at getting you started with AROMA installer as efficiently as possible.

The guide, while clear and well documented, is understandably long. After all, it covers quite a lot of material. This ranges from initial setup and basic editing to things like visual customization, displaying menus and system information, and giving various options. Thankfully, every step along the way has sample code and an accompanying screenshot.

To get started, make your way over to the guide thread.

logo

By now, you should all be familiar with AROMA Installer by XDA Recognized Developer amarullz. As a brief primer for the uninitiated, AROMA installer is a powerful GUI that is accessible via most modern aftermarket recoveries such as TWRP and CWM.

The main purpose of AROMA Installer is to allow you to customize the installation of whatever tweaks, ROMs, kernels, and mods you may be installing. A popular example of this in practice is the popular ElementalX kernel for a range of devices by Recognized Developer flar2. Rather than simply installing when selected in your custom recovery of choice, this kernel gives users a host of options including max clock speed, GPU overclocking, thermal settings, governor options, and much more. In fact, these options (along with the kernel‘s generally superb performance and features) have earned a loyal user out of this particular 2013 Nexus 7 device owner.

So how do you go about using the AROMA Installer with your own development work? XDA Senior Member pankaj88 has created a brief guide showing you exactly how to get started quickly and efficiently. However, this is only a brief guide that doesn’t cover much of AROMA’s customization power. For that, XDA Recognized Contributor Dblfstr has created a separate tutorial thread that covers AROMA, as well as various other questions related to the Edify language and updater-scripts in general.

Head over to pankaj88′s primer thread to get started. Then once you’ve learned the basics and want to get a little more in depth into the power of AROMA, visit Dblfstr’s tutorial thread.

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It’s been some time since we last heard about an update to AROMA. Sure, we publish stories of modifications and tweaks that utilize the AROMA Installer to afford end users choice in customizing exactly what they are installing. However, XDA Recognized Developer amarullz has now given his AROMA Installer a rather hefty update. For those who haven’t yet heard of AROMA, we recommend checking out some of our earlier stories on the installer.

So what do developers have to gain by upgrading to the latest version of AROMA Installer? Increased device compatibility, for starters. Amarullz has stated that his main focus with this release is to build on the installer’s already impressive compatibility, as well as to add stability and performance. However it appears as though devices must support ARM Neon to use the newest version.

AROMA File Manager has been updated as well. The new version brings forth the ability to take screen shots, a new input driver, and a host of other changes. And with an update time of 8 months and a change log lengthy enough to match, we’ll give him the benefit of the doubt.

Whether you’re a developer looking to package your goods in a shiny AROMA package or you simply want a nifty file manager accessible from recovery, you can head over to the AROMA Installer and AROMA File Manager threads to find out more.

HTC One

Despite being an almost sickeningly desirable, ultra-specced, and feature laden beast of a device—so desirable in fact that this self confessed Samsung fanboy considered making it his next device—the HTC One isn’t without it’s little quirks. These are quirks that may just be enough to sway somebody from choosing it over a competitor. One of these is the somewhat baffling decision by HTC to offer only two capacitive buttons and opt for an on screen software menu button in the absence of the commonly seen, yet commonly missing, Android action bar overflow. This can result in an unfortunate amount of screen space being wasted in certain applications.

That however, is now avoidable thanks to a mod known as HTCLogoMenu, which has been incorporated into a custom kernel for the device by XDA Senior Member tbalden. The mod actually enables the HTC logo between the two capacitive buttons to act as a menu key and offer the user a much more familiar and intuitive hard key setupThe logo can also be assigned to other functions such as waking the device if that is something that you would prefer or even a combination of the two functions, all of which are selectable via the kernels AROMA installer.

This is well worth looking into if you’re finding yourself unable to adapt to the stock configuration of the device. You can find more in the original thread.

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By now we all know what AROMA Installer is and just how useful it has become for ROM developers and end users alike. The recovery-based installation environment has proven to be very popular across all XDA device forums, and is used to customize the installation of ROMS, kernels, and various other mods.

And following on from this, AROMA Installer spawned AROMA File manager, which funnily enough, is a handy ‘run from recovery’ feature-rich file manager. Both of these tools recently received an update to improve the touch system, thus making them more compatible with more devices.

XDA Recognized Developer amarullz, the developer of these two projects, has now gone one step further and has integrated a terminal emulator into AROMA File Manager. This is not just a bog standard terminal emulator. AROMA Terminal Emulator has among other features, color shell support, history, tab auto completion and running vi or nano to edit text files.

If you want to try out this ‘run from recovery’ terminal emulator, head on over to the AROMA File Manager thread.

here comes the science bit

Since its release, AROMA Installer by XDA Recognized Developer amarullz has become a pretty popular way for developers and ROM chefs alike to allow users to customize the ROM installation process. If you aren’t already familiar, it is a GUI that runs after you select the ROM you wish to flash in recovery. AROMA can offer you various choices such as different kernels, system apps, launchers, themes, or whatever the developer has decided and allow you to choose between.

Until recently, it took a fair amount of tinkering to make the installer compatible with some devices. Thankfully due to a recent update and a new Input/Touchscreen handler courtesy of Recognized Developer agrabren, the installer no longer requires calibration and may well be popping up on more and more devices in future.

This same good news also extends to another project by amarullz: AROMA File Manager, a tool that allows you to manipulate the file system of your device from recovery. While the installer update is probably more relevant to developers, the file manager is a powerful tool for both developers and end-users alike. Check out the respective Installer and File Manager threads for more information.

Infuse Tool Kit

With numerous tool kits available for a plethora of HTC devices, some Samsung users may feel a little left out. Toolkits are often an integral part of a new user’s experience because they provide easy access to otherwise complex development work.

Samsung Infuse 4G users now have such a toolkit thanks to XDA Recognized Contributor Zen Arcade. The toolkit is unique as it doesn’t run on the PC or while the phone is physically booted, but rather in recovery using the popular AROMA installer. It can flash ROMs and kernels, wipe your device in preparation for a flash, perform backups, and much more. As Zen Arcade explains:

My goal with this project was to see what could be done with the Aroma Installer without relying on the traditional ROM installer capability provided by recovery mode. The result is this “Swiss Army Knife” of capabilities called the Infuse Toolkit.

Those wanting to learn more should head over to the original thread.

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