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Posts Tagged: Asus Transformer TF300T

csm_ASUS_Transformer_Pad_TF300_BLUE_04_d5a206401a

The Asus Transformer TF300T is probably one of the earliest and most refined convertible tablets that the market has seen. It came with a well built and sturdy keyboard dock that featured a trackpad mouse, a full sized USB port, and even its own battery. Its insides weren’t lacking for its time either, packing a quad core processor clocking in at 1.2 GHz. With a spec sheet like this, it was no doubt a popular device with some great development history.

Two years later, the TF300T is still going strong, receiving its own unofficial port of MultiROM thanks to the efforts of XDA Senior Member f69m. As we can all assume, MultiROM lets you easily boot multiple ROMs without having to wipe and restore ROMs. F69m does make it clear that the port is still in its early stages, hence a couple of features that you would expect to see will not work as of yet, including:

  • Store secondary ROMs on external SD cards (including both the tablet and keyboard dock slots)
  • Install Ubuntu Touch as a secondary ROM

Other than that, the port still retains the core functionality of running a primary Android ROM, and booting secondary ROMs from internal memory as well as an external USB drive. The MultiROM port will also need a modified version of TWRP in order to run, and this is also provided in the original post.

If you would like to check this out, visit the original thread for more information.

getbct

Blob files for Nvidia Tegra-powered Asus devices are incredibly useful. This is because they allow us to easily flash images to our devices using Nvflash at an extremely low level.

Given the low level at which APX (Nvflash) mode runs and how this is much more primitive than booting into a standard Android recovery partition, a device with the appropriate blobs is practically unbrickable. Thus, blob files can be used to get us out of seriously sticky situations that would otherwise be unrecoverable without major device surgery.

Naturally, you’d want to have the appropriate blobs for your device just in case anything goes wrong. Thanks to XDA Recognized Developer rayman (and the rest of the crew on the AndroidRoot.mobi team), this is now possible on the (original) Google Nexus 7, as well as the Asus Transformer Prime, TF300T, and TF700.

Flatline creates these blobs for the aforementioned devices. A custom recovery image is used to flash a custom bootloader, as well as to generate the appropriate blobs. This solution is unique from other Nvflash solutions in that doesn’t require a working /data partition for image storage. Rather, blobs can be retrieved from /tmp/AndroidRoot, as explained in the guide linked below.

You can get in on the discussion by visiting the original thread. To go ahead and get started on your own device, visit the developer team’s full guide, complete with modified recovery images and all other required files.

[Thanks to OEM Relations Manager jerdog for the tip.]

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Cyan-10.1

With Android 4.2 development in full swing, devices old and new, big and small could be seeing CM10.1 or similar AOSP-derived offerings in the near future. Let’s face it, if the HTC HD2 can run Android 4.2, pretty much any modern device can. Now, there are CM10.1 ROMs available for the ASUS Transformer TF300T and the Huawei Ideos X5 U8800.

XDA Recognized Developer XpLoDWilD of Team Hacksung is doing the work for the TF300T CM10.1, while the Huawei Ideos X5 is being worked on by XDA Forum Member gleb_grid. Nightlies are available for the TF300T now, whereas the Huawei Ideos X5 has a pre-alpha that needs a lot of work.

The TF300T Nightlies are actually quite stable. Among the issues reported is rotation not working correctly and a Superuser bug. If you don’t rotate the tablet very often, the rotation bug won’t be too annoying. And to alleviate the superuser issues, you can simply download SuperSU. Otherwise, the ROM appears to be working quite well.

Unfortunately, the Huawei Ideos X5 build is pretty rough. The ROM has been set up for development, but none of the issues have actually been fixed yet. At this point, a developer—or team of developers—will have to get their hands dirty making it work. At least it’s a start!

For more details, check out TF300T thread or the Huawei Ideos X5 thread.

archlinux

Running Linux on Android is an old favorite. With newer and older projects ranging from full installations to the less involved chroot method, users on a large range of devices can run Linux. The only limits are what distros of Linux you can load. Mostly, it is Ubuntu or other Debian-based distros. Now, ASUS Transformer TF300T owners can install Arch.

The method has been around for a little bit, but has been refined through updates. XDA Forum Member cb22 released the method. Although it isn’t perfect, it’s definitely a solid start. Here is a list of things currently working:

Dual boot with Android.
Internal storage and MicroSD Card
X11, with compositing
Audio
Mouse and keyboard on the dock, as well as dock hotplugging.
Touchscreen
Playing videos (full 1080P works great.) using Xfce’s media player
Sensors (Light, compass, accelerometer, gyro). These are all exposed under sysfs.
Charging / Dock charging. This appears to be managed by the kernel.
USB gadget (as a RNDIS device for network access via USB)
CPU frequency scaling / Tegra LP core. The LP core is automatically used you can see its status in /sys/kernel/cluster/active (when that file reads LP) and its use is simply what the current CPU1 use appears to be.
WiFi, with NetworkManager
3G, on the TF300TG model, with NetworkManager
Battery (and dock) status in Xfce
USB port on the dock
Some sensible key remapping (Back -> Escape, Search -> Alt, Home -> Super)

The big things not working currently are rebooting from Linux, Bluetooth, and two finger scrolling. These also happen to be on the short list of things that are scheduled to be fixed. There is also a lot that is untested.

For installation instructions and more details, check out the original thread.

asustransformertf300t

As device development continues on, there are more methods and guides to achieve all sorts of things. This includes new root guides for new firmwares, new recoveries as they get updates, and all sorts of other things. Thus, when searching for a guide to do something, users may be looking at an older, obsolete method. For ASUS Transformer TF300T owners, there is now such a new guide.

XDA Forum Member andoryuu3 wrote an all encompassing guide for people who may be getting a brand new Transformer TF300T for Christmas. The guide is pieced together from a number of methods found in a number of places. As androryuu3 explains:

Having recently purchased a TF300T with intent to customize the hell out of it, I ran into a big problem. There wasn’t one definitive guide for my general case, some of the steps I read weren’t completely clear, and I often had to put pieces together from multiple guides to get where I wanted. Halfway through the process it occurred to me that sharing my experience in form of a guide could give the community something I wish that I had when I began.

The process covers unlocking the latest bootloader, rooting the latest firmware, installing the latest recovery, and flashing the latest ROMs. If you just received your TF300T, or you’re about to get one, this is a guide you’ll want to see.

For more info, check out the original thread.

TWRP

The last time we brought you news about TWRP, it was to announce that TWRP 2.2.2 had been released. It had fixed a lot of bugs from the initial release of TWRP 2.2 and added a few new features. Very recently, TWRP has been updated again to version 2.3.

There were a whole bunch of awesome improvements with TWRP 2.2 and a lot of unique and brand new features as well. TWRP 2.3 promises no less. The official change log includes:

Rebased onto AOSP Jelly Bean source code
Rewrote backup, restore, wipe, and mount code in C++ classes for easier maintenance going forward
NOTE: backups from prior versions of TWRP are still compatible with 2.3
ADB sideload functionality from AOSP is included in 2.3, see this link for more info
Re-wrote fix permissions entirely in C++ and runs in a few seconds instead of a few minutes (thanks to bigbiff)
Improvements to zip finding in OpenRecoveryScript (should be a lot fewer GooManager automation issues)
Faster boot times
Added charging indicator while in recovery (only updates once every 60 seconds)

Additionally, XDA Recognized Developer Dees_Troy has reported that there is now support for spaces in backup names. Before, if you added a space to the name of a backup, it would not restore. Now users can use whatever naming convention they want.

One of the biggest changes, though, is all of the TWRP being rewritten in C++ and its move to recovery API 3 instead of API 2. With the code rewrite, it will allow TWRP to update more quickly and with more stability. With the API 3 change, it means that some flashable zip files may stop working because the developer needs to update the update-binary. If you don’t want to wait for the developer, or the developer has ceased working on the project, you can find one to use on TWRP’s official website. To install the latest TWRP, you can use the Goomanager application. Simply open the application, hit menu, and install open recovery.

If you want to check out the latest TWRP recovery for your device, check one of the links below.

NVFlash for the Asus TF300

September 28, 2012   By:

TF300

The Asus Transformer series share a few things in common with its different iterations: bleeding edge hardware (at the time of release), latest OS, a lousy GPS (someone had to say it), and a special group of developers (including XDA Recognized Developers and forum members rayman, lilstevie, kmdm, apache14 and IEFtm). This peculiar individual is the reason why most Asus devices are, for the most part, unbrickable, and also why some are able enjoy the goodness of Ubuntu through NVFlash operations.

In case you have a TF300 and cannot help but wonder why this option is not available for your device (especially if you are an owner of the original Transformer), we are glad to inform you that your wait is over. Rayman has successfully (in one sleepless night according to him) developed and released NVFlash for the wallet-friendly TF300.

There are a few caveats that you need to be aware of prior to applying this on your TF300—the most important being that if you wish to revive a device, this will not work as it is a tool designed to prevent a Transformer from transforming into a brick and not to get it back from that state. Also, since the bootloader changed (and was relocked) with the latest JB update, you will need to make sure that you did NOT update your device to official JB. Aside from these issues, backing your device up and having this on your device will allow you to always recover from a bad flash, even if you somehow mess up the bootloader!

Please take this for a spin, but remember that as with most procedures of this kind, you can seriously damage your device if you try to skip steps or don’t follow directions. Have fun!

 After a hard day of extra testing, we’re proud to announce Nvflash for TF300.

You can find more information in the original thread.

Want something published in the Portal? Contact any News Writer.

ASUS1

Manufacturers do what they do and (eventually) release their latest firmwares. Here at XDA, we do what we do and hack their latest firmwares.

Recently, ASUS released the Jelly Bean-based 10.4.2.13 firmware for the Transformer TF300T. Even more recently, XDA Recognized Contributor serdu_petru has released three modified versions of the stock firmware, ranging from simple root access to root, insecure kernel, deodex, and Busybox.

These builds have since become the base for other development work on the device. If you have an ASUS Transformer TF300T and are ready for some rooted JellyBean, head over to the original thread.

1598419770fda2b0a73d7da3c61c014314cd5471

There isn’t another tablet manufacturer out there that can match ASUS’ commitment to rolling out timely updates to it’s customers. They have consistently beaten the bigger names to updating their devices, and recently confirmed that the Transformer TF101, Transformer Prime, and Transformer Infinity would be getting the update to Android 4.1.1. Now they are beginning to follow through on that promise with an update for the Transformer TF300T.

On ASUS’ Facebook page today they made the following announcement:

Dear Valued ASUS Customers,We are pleased to announce that we will be rolling out a major software update for the ASUS Transformer Pad TF300, which will bring Android™ 4.1, Jelly Bean to the device for the first time in North America. In addition to this being the first of our planned Jelly Bean updates for the Transformer Series, we have also added a range of new features, including new power saving options, global file search and several improvements to the pre-installed apps.

We will announce Jelly Bean update plans for other Transformer Pad Series devices in the near future, so stay tuned.

Thank you for your continued support.

ASUS

Numerous users are reporting that they are receiving the update automatically, so if you haven’t yet received it and are stock you can attempt to force the update by going to Settings -> System Firmware Update -> Check Update. However if you are rooted, we recommend that you wait for one of the talented developers on XDA to get ahold of the package and provide a pre-rooted solution.
Return To Stock

There are many reasons why someone would need to go back to stock. They may need to return a device for replacement, they might want to install an OTA, or they may have rooted their device and broken a necessary feature. Whatever it may be, a good guide to return to unrooted stock can be almost as important as the root guide for certain users. There is now a return-to-stock guide for the ASUS Transformer TF300T that works and isn’t very difficult to follow.

To get started, users will need to download the Android SDK to get access to ADB and Fastboot. From there, it’s a matter of finding the correct stock firmware and installing it. Users are directed to go to the official ASUS website to get the stock firmware, which may be different from user to user based on their SKU, and then use Fastboot commands to flash the blob.

While easy to follow, there are occasionally a few hiccups. As guide author XDA Forum Member Auliyaa explains:

For some reason, the transfer seems to fail from time to time, if so, just try again by going back to previous step.

Once everything installs successfully, simple reboot the TF300T and prepare to be back to factory stock.

For the full tutorial, check out the original thread.

ASUS Transformer JB

Jelly Bean has been rolling out across XDA at a fervent pace. Between it being released for the latest Nexus devices and developers releasing it for a variety of other devices, Jelly Bean is quickly making its way everywhere.

One of the most recent devices to get a fresh taste of Jelly Bean is the ASUS Transformer TF300T. Developed as a preview for the much anticipated CyanogenMod 10, XDA Recognized Developer XpLoDWilD got Jelly Bean 4.1.1 working on the TF300T until CM10 was complete enough to compile from.

As is to be expected for early builds of Jelly Bean, the ROM is a little rough. About half of the main features work, and about half don’t work. The current list of working features include:

- Wi-Fi
- Bluetooth
- Storage
- Audio playback
- Sensors

And what still needs fixed:

- Camera
- Audio volume (is stuck at either 0 or 50%)
- Audio recording likely
- HW Video playback (but software playback works)
- Screenshot

XpLoDWilD has asked that users with a little bit of testing experience be the ones to flash it, as it is a rough build. The installation process is a little unique as well. Users looking to flash the ROM will have to flash it over custom recovery then flash a boot.img through fastboot before rebooting, so be sure to read the instructions carefully.

For additional information, check out the original thread.

[Thanks goes out to XDA Forum Member malamalaful for the tip!]

filemanagerrenam

Just about three months ago, we brought you news that the Team Win Recovery Project had received a massive update to version 2.1. April’s release largely heralded the start of a new age in recoveries—where one would no longer have to deal with cumbersome menus, instead interacting with a very user-friendly GUI.

It wasn’t simply about the GUI either. In addition to bringing an unrivaled level of UI polish, TWRP 2.1 offered users many advanced features such as update.zip queuing, a basic file manager, and dual storage support for Nandroid backups. Additionally, TWRP added support for the open source scripting engine OpenRecoveryScript, which works in conjunction with the previously covered GooManager.

How do you follow up something as revolutionary as TWRP 2.1? With TWRP 2.2, of course. That’s how! The new release builds on the previous offering by delivering many recovery “firsts.” For starters, this is the first recovery to feature on on-screen keyboard. Why would you want such a thing? How about naming and renaming Nandroid backups! TWRP 2.2 is also the only recovery to split extremely large backups, allowing users to backup and restore /data partitions larger than the 2 GB FAT32 file size limit.

In the words of XDA Recognized Developer Dees_Troy:

- On-screen keyboard in recovery! — supports long press, backspace repeat, and swipe left deletes everything left of the cursor
- Name new backups and rename existing backups
- Rename files and folders in the file manager
- Pseudo-terminal emulator
- Support decrypting an encrypted data partition on Galaxy Nexus (enter password using keyboard)
- Backup archive splitting — allows backup and restore of data partitions larger than 2GB
- Simplified XML layout support between resolutions
- Added dual storage selection radio buttons to zip install, backup, and restore pages
- Improved zip install compatibility
- Updated update-binary source code
- Numerous small bug fixes and improvements

Eager to get started? I know I am. Head to the links below to obtain the appropriate version for your device:

ASUS Root

Many devices in the Android world have the capacity to share software. As anyone who frequently visits the Sony Xperia line up sub forums can tell you, a single modification for a device can often be used on a myriad of devices. Sometimes, it’s a simple performance mod or a theme, but other times it’s something important—like a root method. We recently brought you news of a method to root the Transformer TF300T without downgrading, and it turns out that this method can also be used for the Asus Transformer Prime.

The tool, called Debugfs Automated Root, was developed by XDA Senior Member sparkym3, who is no stranger to rooting the Transformer Prime. This particularly tools pulls from a variety of sources, all credited of course.

Debugfs is about as easy to use as a one-clock method gets. Users simply download the package, unzip it and run the .bat included. Need the drivers? No worries as they are included in the package as well. The best feature, by far, is the compatibility as this tool has been released in a few versions for a few Transformer devices including:

Latest Supported Versions:
v9.4.2.28 for the TF201
v9.2.1.24 for the TF101
v9.4.3.29 for the TF300

So if you own one of these devices, this tool will work for you.

For users who want to learn more, head over to the original thread.

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