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Posts Tagged: ASUS Transformer

TWRP

The last time we brought you news about TWRP, it was to announce that TWRP 2.2.2 had been released. It had fixed a lot of bugs from the initial release of TWRP 2.2 and added a few new features. Very recently, TWRP has been updated again to version 2.3.

There were a whole bunch of awesome improvements with TWRP 2.2 and a lot of unique and brand new features as well. TWRP 2.3 promises no less. The official change log includes:

Rebased onto AOSP Jelly Bean source code
Rewrote backup, restore, wipe, and mount code in C++ classes for easier maintenance going forward
NOTE: backups from prior versions of TWRP are still compatible with 2.3
ADB sideload functionality from AOSP is included in 2.3, see this link for more info
Re-wrote fix permissions entirely in C++ and runs in a few seconds instead of a few minutes (thanks to bigbiff)
Improvements to zip finding in OpenRecoveryScript (should be a lot fewer GooManager automation issues)
Faster boot times
Added charging indicator while in recovery (only updates once every 60 seconds)

Additionally, XDA Recognized Developer Dees_Troy has reported that there is now support for spaces in backup names. Before, if you added a space to the name of a backup, it would not restore. Now users can use whatever naming convention they want.

One of the biggest changes, though, is all of the TWRP being rewritten in C++ and its move to recovery API 3 instead of API 2. With the code rewrite, it will allow TWRP to update more quickly and with more stability. With the API 3 change, it means that some flashable zip files may stop working because the developer needs to update the update-binary. If you don’t want to wait for the developer, or the developer has ceased working on the project, you can find one to use on TWRP’s official website. To install the latest TWRP, you can use the Goomanager application. Simply open the application, hit menu, and install open recovery.

If you want to check out the latest TWRP recovery for your device, check one of the links below.

filemanagerrenam

Just about three months ago, we brought you news that the Team Win Recovery Project had received a massive update to version 2.1. April’s release largely heralded the start of a new age in recoveries—where one would no longer have to deal with cumbersome menus, instead interacting with a very user-friendly GUI.

It wasn’t simply about the GUI either. In addition to bringing an unrivaled level of UI polish, TWRP 2.1 offered users many advanced features such as update.zip queuing, a basic file manager, and dual storage support for Nandroid backups. Additionally, TWRP added support for the open source scripting engine OpenRecoveryScript, which works in conjunction with the previously covered GooManager.

How do you follow up something as revolutionary as TWRP 2.1? With TWRP 2.2, of course. That’s how! The new release builds on the previous offering by delivering many recovery “firsts.” For starters, this is the first recovery to feature on on-screen keyboard. Why would you want such a thing? How about naming and renaming Nandroid backups! TWRP 2.2 is also the only recovery to split extremely large backups, allowing users to backup and restore /data partitions larger than the 2 GB FAT32 file size limit.

In the words of XDA Recognized Developer Dees_Troy:

- On-screen keyboard in recovery! — supports long press, backspace repeat, and swipe left deletes everything left of the cursor
- Name new backups and rename existing backups
- Rename files and folders in the file manager
- Pseudo-terminal emulator
- Support decrypting an encrypted data partition on Galaxy Nexus (enter password using keyboard)
- Backup archive splitting — allows backup and restore of data partitions larger than 2GB
- Simplified XML layout support between resolutions
- Added dual storage selection radio buttons to zip install, backup, and restore pages
- Improved zip install compatibility
- Updated update-binary source code
- Numerous small bug fixes and improvements

Eager to get started? I know I am. Head to the links below to obtain the appropriate version for your device:

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ASUS Root

Many devices in the Android world have the capacity to share software. As anyone who frequently visits the Sony Xperia line up sub forums can tell you, a single modification for a device can often be used on a myriad of devices. Sometimes, it’s a simple performance mod or a theme, but other times it’s something important—like a root method. We recently brought you news of a method to root the Transformer TF300T without downgrading, and it turns out that this method can also be used for the Asus Transformer Prime.

The tool, called Debugfs Automated Root, was developed by XDA Senior Member sparkym3, who is no stranger to rooting the Transformer Prime. This particularly tools pulls from a variety of sources, all credited of course.

Debugfs is about as easy to use as a one-clock method gets. Users simply download the package, unzip it and run the .bat included. Need the drivers? No worries as they are included in the package as well. The best feature, by far, is the compatibility as this tool has been released in a few versions for a few Transformer devices including:

Latest Supported Versions:
v9.4.2.28 for the TF201
v9.2.1.24 for the TF101
v9.4.3.29 for the TF300

So if you own one of these devices, this tool will work for you.

For users who want to learn more, head over to the original thread.

Asus Transformer

As time passes after a device is released, older root methods often get patched. Thus, developers often are forced to find a new exploit to provide their users with root access. Sometimes it can be a rough process and other times it’s as easy as changing from one known root exploit to a different one.

In any case, once a newer firmware gets rooted, one can almost certainly bet that a one-click process is right around the corner—and for users of the Asus Transformer TF101 and TF101G on the .24 firmware, that time is now. XDA Senior Member Thing O Doom has released the new one-click method for users after seeing various questions asking if older root methods worked with the latest firmware release.

The method itself is easy to use. Simply download and run the included Windows .bat file with the device plugged in, and your device will be rooted. Even so, Thing O Doom politely requests that anyone using this method read the included ReadMe first. The method is unfortunately only compatible with Windows 7 x86-64 systems—so x86 systems, Linux, and Mac users will have to get to load a Windows 7 x86-64 virtual machine order to make it work.

Head on over to the original thread to get rooted.

Downgrade

Over the last few months, downgrading firmware has seemingly been all the rage. Not because the newest firmwares aren’t great, and not because there’s anything wrong with them—it’s because downgrading is often the last recourse left in device rooting troublesome devices. There are other reasons as well, but no matter what the reasoning is, users of the Asus Transformer can now downgrade as they choose, whether they’re rooted or not.

XDA Forum Member wolf849 has written up a few useful methods for downgrading your Transformer to the firmware you want. There are three methods altogether, the first for rooted users only, the other two for unrooted users only. Let the downgrading begin!

All of the methods are similar in that users have to put a BLOB file onto their internal storage and then execute several ADB commands. This is nice because any user going through the process more or less has to run through the same experience, just with different commands. Just be sure that you’re doing the correct method before you get started because, as wolf849 says:

Note that downgrading method for unrooted devices is highly experimental and may turn your device into worthless brick. Read this WHOLE thread carefully before you start doing anything with your Transformer.

So as always, be extra careful about which method you intend on following, and be sure you fulfill all of the prerequisites. Otherwise, you could potentially damage your device permanently. It should be mentioned that these methods are also compatible with the Asus Transformer Prime as well. As with the Transformer, be sure you’re doing the correct method depending on whether or not your device is rooted.

For those looking to downgrade their Transformer or Transformer Prime, head on over the original thread for full instructions, credits, downloads, and warnings.

Transformer

There are a plethora of tools out there that help developers do all sorts of things. From cooking ROMs to compiling kernels to editing and modifying apk files, you can find a tool for almost anything if you search long enough or hard enough. For owners of the Asus Transformer and Asus Transformer Prime, developers have a nifty little application called Blob Tools. XDA Forum Member rayman84 released the tool a little while ago, but aspiring developers are still using it as a stepping stone to get their ROMs working properly on the old school Transformer.

The application itself is a tad complicated and is suggested for use to only those who are serious about learning to develop on the Transformer. It is also only compatible for Linux as of right now so Windows and Mac users will need to Virtual Box their favorite Linux distribution in order to use it. It includes a series of commands that allow developers to alter anything from the system files to controlling whether or not their blob has a boot.img or a custom recovery aboard. The things that can be altered include (but are not limited to):

blob.HEADER – Header stuff (ignore it)
blob.APP – system.img
blob.LNX – boot.img
blob.SOS – recovery.img (e.g. regular boot.img)
blob.EBT – bootloader.bin (ignore)

Devs looking to get started on the Transformer devices can head on over to the Blob Thread for additional information and download links. You’ll have to read a couple of pages in order to get all the instructions, but they’re all there. Of course, make a complete backup before attempting to flash your new creations, just to be on the safe side.

Update: for a Windows-compatible version that works with the Transformer Prime, visit this post courtesy of XDA Forum Member sparkym3!

Team_EOS

Team EOS has done so much for the Motorola Xoom over the past few months when it comes to Android 4.0 Ice Cream Sandwich, and now they bring their work to the ASUS Transformer. Enlisting the help of XDA Senior Member Roach2010 back in November of 2011, a ROM was built with AOSP as its base but no hardware support was available. After ASUS released ICS for the Transformer on February 24th, the team had all they needed. The developer released a basic preview of the ROM on the 25th, and two days later these nightlies came to fruition.

The developer states that the only real bugs right now have to do with the proprietary dock functions, and he is currently working to work out the compatibility kinks. However, flashing a nightly build always carries an inherent risk of instability. As such, these builds carry the usual disclaimer:

A quick note on Nightlies: NIGHTLIES ARE DEVELOPMENT BUILDS. They are automatically generated once every 24 hours and represent the compilation of the latest commits to the code repository. While every effort is made ensure that the commits that are accepted are stable and do not have a negative impact to the overall performance and function of the builds it is not possible to test every aspect of a commits impact to the overall repo prior to it’s inclusion in a given build. As a result it is entirely possible that instabilities may be introduced as a result of a given days commits. That is the nature of the nightly system, and the risk that is taken using the latest code changes to the project. 

EOS is an AOSP based rom. It is developed and maintained by Team EOS and is the culmination of our own in house development efforts.

Those interested should continue to the ROM thread.

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