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Posts Tagged: boot animation

flan-nexus-boot

A boot animation is the first thing a user sees after turning on a phone or tablet. This introductory part of the ROM is very important, and directly influences our experience of said ROM. For this, Android uses PNG files and a desc.txt bundled into one zip. The text file contains resolution and frame rate information so that the boot animation displays at the correct size and with the desired speed.

Making a public preview of boot animation wasn’t as easy as it sounds. Recording from a device with a video camera definitely doesn’t look professional, and the video quality leaves much to be desired. If you ever planned to make a video of your boot animation, you should definitely give a try to a Windows-only tool written by XDA Forum Member makers_mark. A batch script pulls down the boot animation from the device using ADB. Then, it converts the bootanimation into an MP4 file that is ready to be uploaded to YouTube or similar video delivery services. The script uses such tools like 7zip to unpack the archive and FFmpeg to convert those files into a video. The process is carefully described in the thread, with an explanation of the particular elements that go into boot animations.

The tool works only on Windows machines, and it can be downloaded from the original thread.

android painter

If you’ve already taken a look at the boot animation utility featuring 400 different animations for your Android device, but haven’t seen anything that catches your eye, you may want to create your very own boot animation. If this is the case, you may want to check out XDA Senior Member ayushrox‘s guide on how to do so.

A guide written for Windows Users, it lays down the foundations by explaining just exactly what a boot animation is, what it consists of, and what each component’s purpose is. A process that is actually quite simple, ayushrox breaks it down into 10 ‘bite-size’ chunks, or steps, for the newcomer who may not know all the pedantic details that is required. Accompanying screenshots and examples of code are also conveniently provided for the steps that may require some visual aid. Ayushrox highly recommends the use of image editing software such as Adobe Photoshop, and having either 7Zip or Winrar installed when creating boot animations, as they are necessary for the required steps.

Again, it is quite a simple process that, with a bit of practice, will become second nature just like any of the other tasks involved in theming your Android device. So if you would like to create the perfect boot animation for yourself, or have a custom animation for your ROM or kernel, be sure to check out the guide at its original post.

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bootanimation utility

The default boot animations on any device, no matter which manufacturer, are generally pretty bland and boring, which is probably why many of us dedicate an unreasonable amount of our time in our quest for the ‘perfect’ boot animation to greet us every time we turn on our device. Well, there is good news, as XDA Forum Member Vincent8111 has compiled nearly 400 boot animations into one program for our pleasure and convenience.

The BootAnimation Changer runs on Windows PCs and delivers an extensive collection of boot animations spanning a multitude of different themes. Animations can be sorted either by name or file size, and range from the opening sequence of The Simpsons, to anime, to colorful abstract patterns, and of course, our beloved Android mascot. If you would like to see the entire boot animation, you can conveniently do so with the preview button and window.

One notable feature of the BootAnimation Changer is that although each animation comes by default in its own native resolution, they can be resized to the dimensions of your device. Now, one would think that this would limit the amount of choice for users with unconventional resolution devices. However thankfully, Vincnte8111 included a homothetic option. This keeps the proportions of the animation while resizing, rather than stretching the animation to fill a larger area which will result in warping and loss of quality. However, devices with higher resolution will still be restricted in terms of choice, as there is no way of actually enlarging images while keeping the same quality and details. When resizing boot animations, you can also set the the quality of the JPEG image files of the animation on a ’0 to 10′ scale if you would like to adjust the animation file size.

The other nifty useful function of the BootAnimation Changer is the ability to export the boot animation as a zip file, which you subsequently flash onto your device through a custom recovery. And for users who own devices with no external storage capabilities, the flexibility to flash the animation onto the device through Android Debug Bridge (ADB).

A bit of a warning though, especially for those with limited broadband usage, the program comes in at a pretty hefty 1.6 gigabytes thanks to the 400 or so boot animations that comes with it. The BootAnimation Changer comes in French, and English, and is free from the original XDA post. If you would like to know more, visit the program thread for more information and download.

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