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Posts Tagged: CASUAL

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Odin and Heimdall were pretty badass gods in the Nordic mythology. But to Samsung device owners, these are important and powerful tools designed to flash stock ROM files, much like Flashtool on Sony phones. In short, they are an essential part of Samsung Android development here at XDA.

Many times in the past, we’ve talked about XDA Senior Recognized Developer AdamOutler‘s CASUAL, otherwise known as Cross-platform Android Scripting Unified Auxiliary Loader.  The cross-platform Java-based tool allows you to perform many cool tasks like rooting, flashing stock ROMs. and so on.

The project is now on a different level, as Adam has presented JOdin3, a web browser-based and offline flashing tool. With JOdin3, you are able to flash stock Samsung firmware directly from your browser. The project is a collaboration of between Adam and XDA Senior Developers Benjamin Dobell and Ralekdev, and XDA Senior Members Loglud and jrloper.

You need to have Java installed on your PC in order to use JOdin3. Heimdall is also required, but it will be automatically downloaded and installed. As it’s a cross-platform tool, it works flawlessly on Windows, Mac, and Linux.

More information regarding this project can be found in the original thread. You can read more about CASUAL on the official website of the project.

[Thanks to XDA Recognized Contributor benkxda for the tip!]

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Not too long ago, XDA Elite Recognized Developer Adam Outler launched the CASUAL-Dev website. The site’s goal was to help other developers make use of CASUAL, or Cross-platform Android Scripting Unified Auxiliary Loader, as a launching platform for future development work.

At launch, Adam’s site mainly described how to use the CASCADE IDE to create a CASPAC (CASUAL Package Action Container). From there, the site showed users how to turn a CASPAC into a full CASUAL package with CASPACkager. However, the site didn’t do much in the way of helping users get started the basics such as setting up the source that will be built.

In a new guide published on the CASUAL-dev site, Adam now describes how to setup your computer with Subversion and Netbeans, as well as how import your projects and build your code. Developers wanting to learn more should head over to Adam’s quick guide.

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Not too long ago, we covered XDA Elite Recognized Developer Adam Outler‘s new website Casual-Dev. The site was built to help other developers leverage his open source offerings in order to use CASUAL as a delivery method for outside development projects.

Since then, we featured a simple recovery flasher for the HTC One that in and of itself wasn’t terribly groundbreaking. However, it handedly demonstrated the viability of using CASUAL as a launching platform for development work. Now, XDA Senior Members enricocid and ivn888 have created a universal image flashing tool that uses the CASUAL platform as its delivery method.

The current implementation isn’t quite the friendliest interface yet, but usage isn’t terribly difficult either. Inside the tool’s JAR package, you’ll find a Scripts folder with four zips that correspond to flashing your bootloader, recovery, kernel, and radio. Once you obtain the image you wish to flash, place that inside the zip housed in the JAR. From there, run the JAR and choose the type of image you would like to flash. It’s as simple as that.

It’s great to see more work packaged using Adam’s CASUAL platform. Head over to the original thread to get started.

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Now at version 2.3, the Xposed Framework note supports MIUI and x86 and has new features. That and much more news is covered by Jordan, as he reviews all the important stories from this week. Included in this week’s news is an article reporting on rumrunner S-Off being achieved on the Verizon HTC One and the announcement that LTE Nexus 7 4.3.1 JLS36I restore images are available.

Jordan talks about the other videos released this week on XDA Developer TV. XDA Developer TV Producer TK reviewed the Samsung Galaxy Note 3, Jordan released a video showing you how to install Ubuntu Touch on a original Nexus 7 (2012), and TK gave us a tutorial on how to root the Samsung Galaxy Note 3. Pull up a chair and check out this video.

READ ON »

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A few days ago, we talked about XDA Elite Recognized Developer AdamOutler‘s new site Casual-Dev. The site’s aim is to show developers how to leverage the open source CASUAL software as a platform from which to launch their own development works. Now, we have news of one of the first development works based upon Adam’s work, and it comes in the form of a ClockworkMod Recovery flasher for the HTC One.

The recovery flashing tool comes from XDA Forum Member MightyBear007, and it was built using the CASCADE IDE, and packaged into its own complete CASUAL with CASPACkager. The actual recovery flashed is the well regarded ClockworkMod Touch 6.0.4.3 by XDA Recognized Developer Flyhalf205, which is the official CWM release for the device. More information can be found in the recovery’s release thread.

If you’ve been looking for a nifty new way of installing CWM on your HTC One, or simply want to see the open source CASUAL project utilized by another developer, head over to the original post. If instead you’d rather install the recovery manually, head over to the original recovery thread. Again, what makes this cool is not so much the (admittedly great) recovery image. OK, that’s cool as well. Rather, the most exciting part is that Adam’s open source CASUAL platform is now being leveraged by other developers as a delivery method.

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Chances are, you’ve heard of XDA Elite Recognized Developer AdamOutler‘s CASUAL tool before. Although the Java-based tool is most frequently used for acquiring root quickly and easily on various devices, there is a whole lot more that you can do with CASUAL. For those who may have forgotten, CASUAL stands for Cross-platform Android Scripting, Unified Auxiliary Loader. And as its name implies, it’s a universal infrastructure for deploying firmware and other hacks to Android  from any Windows, Linux, or Mac computer—provided that you have Java Runtime Environment installed.

Not content with simply using CASUAL for his own wiles, Adam made the project open source for other developers to build from. Now, Adam is launching a new website, CASUAL-Dev.com, where developers can find anything and everything related to CASUAL development. You may be wondering why you would want to use CASUAL as the launching point for your own development work. Well, in the words of Adam:

If you’re a developer of Android firmware, software, or exploits; CASUAL is meant for you. CASUAL provides a way to package these developments and distribute them in a way that does not exclude Windows, Linux, or Mac users. It also solves platform/device-specific problems, troubleshoots errors, and in the event that CASUAL cannot fix the problem, it provides the user with steps to take.

In addition to describing the package and its components, Adam describes how to create a CASPAC (CASUAL Package Action Container) using the CASCADE IDE. Adam’s site also walks new CASUAL developers through the process of taking a CASPAC and turning it into a full CASUAL package using CASPACkager. The whole process is documented through the use of sample code and syntax, so that the mental cost of entry is as low as possible.

Head over to CASUAL-Dev to learn how you can get started with CASUAL development.

PS. If you’re “simply” an end-user, don’t think Adam has forgotten about you either. He is also contemplating implementing a new and cleaner user interface developed by Randall Schwartzentruber. So if you like it, then you’d better put a ring on it leave a comment on Adam’s page stating that you’d like to see the new UI in the next version of CASUAL.

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XDA Elite Recognized Developer AdamOutler is known for many things: tearing down devices and identifying the parts, UnBrickableMod, his anti-Apple Google+ posts, and more. But that’s not all AdamOutler has done. He’s also created a very dynamic device hacking tool called CASUAL.

The Cross-platform Android Scripting and Unified Auxiliary Loader is a package handler that you have seen Adam use to root and bootloader install devices before. In today’s video, he shows you what is possible with CASUAL. Most importantly he shows you how to contribute to CASUAL and make your own CASUAL for your device. Check this video out!

READ ON »

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Thinking about rooting and installing the fantastic TWRP recovery on your brand new AT&T Galaxy S 4? Are you looking for a more CASUAL™ way of going about things? Give it a go with Cross-platform Android Scripting and Unified Auxiliary Loader!

As with all things CASUAL, this comes by way of XDA Elite Recognized Developer AdamOutler. However, ultimate credit for these wiles that Adam has packaged into this iteration of CASUAL goes to XDA Recognized Developer djrbliss. As Adam puts it:

Credits @djrbliss - Motochopper and Loki

So what can you expect with Adam’s tool? As with the other CASUAL-packaged root methods, this will root your device and install the fantastic TWRP recovery with a single click. Furthermore, as the C in CASUAL implies, this Java-based program will run on any OS, provided that you have Java installed. In addition to having Java on the host machine, you also need to have USB debugging enabled on the target device.

Adam has also provided a video for those who want to see it in action before applying it on their own devices:

Looking to get started? If so, you can do so by visiting the original thread. And if you prefer CWM as your recovery of choice, Adam also has you covered.

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There has been a bit of a back and forth between the development community and Verizon lately, specifically relating to the Samsung Galaxy Note 2. It is perhaps best summed up by XDA Elite Recognized Developer AdamOutler:

“Well, this has been quite the saga thus far… 
Us: Suck It Verizon (exploit)
them: Suck it XDA-Developers (OTA patch)
Us: Back Atcha Verizon (exploit)
them: Stop it XDA (OTA Patch)
Us: No You! (exploit)”

The combination of Adam’s CASUAL deployment system and Recognized Developer Ralekdev‘s exploits themselves has been continually providing Verizon Note 2 owners with the ability to free their device through each OTA. The pair have once again managed to undo the restrictions put in place by the latest update, and they have released that exploit to the public.  Be aware that this is only for those who are running a completely stock ROM. If you are not stock and have already installed a custom recovery, this will cause you issues.

This exploit lifts the restrictions put in place by Verizon that prevent the device from running unauthorized software. Be warned that it will leave you unable to accept their OTA updates. However, you will now have a much friendlier bootloader, and who doesn’t want that?

For those of you who are running a stock ROM and looking to unlock their device, the usual rules apply. Windows(7/8)/Mac/Linux users can all make use of this cross platform tool, which will take you through the process quickly and easily. Make sure you have Java installed beforehand and you’re all set.  As always, be prepared to take a log if you run into any issues, and make sure to have a thorough read through the development thread before starting the process.

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Owners of the Verizon variant of the Samsung Galaxy Note 10.1 tablet will no longer feel left out, thanks to the unlock package that XDA Elite Recognized Developer AdamOutler posted late Friday night. Although he takes issue with the word ‘unlock,’ preferring to call it a ‘jailbreak’ because that term is exempted by the DMCA.

The process couldn’t be easier thanks to Adam’s CASUAL software. I’m sure you’ve heard of it before since it’s been features on XDA TV and several Portal posts. The software provides a GUI for scripts that use the Android Developer Bridge (ADB) and it works on Linux, Mac, and Windows. The power of CASUAL is well represented in this procedure. Adam’s demo video shows that clicking the Do It button and following the prompts is all it really takes. From there, the script performs an IROM unlock using exploits discovered by Lee Harrison (Recognized Developer Ralekdev).

Get your hands on the unlock package by heading over to the original thread. While you’re there, heed Adam’s warning about flashing once you unlock your Note. The exploit used leaves it vulnerable to being bricked if you flash a file not meant for this specific hardware.

Android-Devices

It used to be the case that whenever you wanted to use ADB or FastBoot with a device, you were required to install a specific driver for each device. For anyone regularly flashing several devices or developers who test on numerous different phones and tablets, this could prove to be something of an inconvenience, especially when setting up for the first time and having to hunt around in a dingy corner of an OEM website looking for the correct driver. Thankfully, things are somewhat simpler nowadays thanks to several different solutions to this old issue.

You may remember us previously talking about the Universal Naked Driver by XDA Senior Member 1wayjonny. This is a Windows based tool (compatible with XP, Vista, 7 and 8) that allows you to make use of ADB, Fastboot, and (for ASUS devices) APX on over 250 different devices with minimal effort. Check out the link above and the forum thread for more information on this one.

Continuing on from the success of the Universal Naked Driver, Koush has taken the device/vendor ids collected within the UND thread and used them to create an alternative solution, which claims to work on all Android phones and all versions of Windows, presumably XP and above. You can find Koush’s Universal ADB Driver and the source for it from the G+ post linked to above.

Last but certainly not least is a project entitled Casual Android Driver Installer, or CADI for short. This is the brainchild of XDA Senior Member jrloper, and like the two already mentioned options, it attempts to alleviate the frustration of device-specific drivers. The difference with CADI though is that it is fully integrated into the CASUAL by XDA Elite Recognized Developer AdamOutler and takes a somewhat different approach to the problem. It uses elements of an open source USB device driver installer called libwdi by Pete Batard and essentially determines which devices are connected via USB before generating drivers on the fly and automatically taking care of the installation process. That’s a pretty good example of three open source projects coming together in a glorious trinity of non-proprietary loveliness if ever I saw one.

So if you are still plagued by the problem of individual drivers for each of your devices, it’s definitely in your best interests to look into one, or indeed all of these options. Let us know your preferred method of driver avoidance in the comments below.

 

 

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XDA Elite Recognized Developer AdamOutler has updated CASUAL for the Verizon Galaxy Note II and the AT&T Samsung Galaxy S III. That story and more are covered by Jordan, as he reviews all the important stories from this week. Included in this week’s news is the article about the deodexing and odexing converter.

Jordan talks about the other videos released this week on XDA Developer TV. XDA Developer TV Producer Steve gives his explanation for switching Back to Android, XDA Developer TV Producer  AdamOutler gives his thoughts of Google I/O, and XDA Developer TV Producer TK released an Android app review of aeGis. Pull up a chair and check out this video.

READ ON »

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XDA Elite Recognised Developer AdamOutler is at it again. Following up on his Verizon Note II root method, he continues to roll out safe and easy-to-deploy root exploits via CASUAL, the Cross-platform ADB Scripting, Universal Android Loader.This time, the device in question is the AT&T Samsung Galaxy S III.

One of the major benefits of CASUAL is that it is cross platform. Adam has been spending a great deal of time in bringing support for many different platforms to a consistent level. If you have him circled on Google+, you may have already noticed him tackling the OS X upgrade process in an effort to test these exploits for Mac users. That’s where you come in. Adam is especially keen to hear from users of both OS X and various different Linux distros about how CASUAL functions for them. It even works on the Raspberry Pi, so if you want to test it out on one of those and report back, I’m sure it would be much appreciated.

This latest mod will root an AT&T Galaxy SIII incredibly easily, as CASUAL handles the download and installation of drivers and runtimes. The end result is a fully rooted device courtesy of Elite Recognised Developer Chainfire’s CF-Auto Root. This will work even for those who are already rooted, so if you’d simply like to help test for compatibility you can do so without unrooting beforehand.

So if you have an AT&T SIII, rooted or not, what are you waiting for? Head on over to the development thread and lend a hand in making this the ultimate cross platform utility.

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