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Posts Tagged: CyanogenMod 10.1

SGSP11

If you rewind back to a couple of months ago, you may remember that dual boot was achieved on the Samsung Galaxy S Plus. Well, there’s been more happening with this device, the refresh of the perhaps more popular Samsung Galaxy S. Shipped all the way back in 2011 with Android 2.3.3 Gingerbread, it only received an incremental, official update to Android 2.3.6 before being discontinued by Samsung.

Fortunately however, Galaxy S Plus owners will see the abandoned device get back on its feet and march on, as XDA Recognized Developers CastagnaIT, Christopher83, educk and ivendor, and Recognized Contributor krislibaeer have teamed up as DevConnection_Team and delivered the latest iteration of Android, 4.4.2 Kitkat to the Galaxy S Plus. The ROM comes as an unofficial CyanogenMod 11 build, and is currently in its beta phase, but despite this, the rom seems to be stable with all of the major functions working as they should. The working list so far includes:

  • Audio
  • Calls
  • GPS
  • Compass
  • Proximity sensor
  • Wifi
  • Bluetooth
  • USB mass storage
  • CameraUSB/Wifi tethering
  • USB OTG (Only FAT32 supported as of now)
  • MicroSD exFAT support

This is quite the achievement, as this was only possible with a hybrid memory allocation solution involving both ION and PMEM memory allocation, with the latter only required for the camera librarys and drivers. Thanks to this solution, this team of developers were also able to bring unofficial builds of CyanogenMod 10.1 and 10.2 to the Galaxy S Plus.

If you would like to find out more on the development progress, visit the respective forum threads for more details:

xperia-s-hero-black-1240x840-84a4f0d48a8cbe7cab3d97bcc2fdc195

Earlier today, we talked about a highly functional KitKat build for the Sony Xperia S created by XDA Recognized Developer RaymanFX and the OpenSEMC team. The release, which brings daily driver-status unofficial CM11 to the much loved Xperia S is perhaps the top choice for users looking for the latest and greatest software on their unlocked device.

But what about users who haven’t or can’t unlock their bootloaders? Well, that’s no longer an issue thanks to a ROM created by XDA Recognized Contributors djolivier and letama, and Recognized Developer atis112. The ROM is made possible thanks to a workaround developed by djolivier and letama, where a second ramdisk is loaded, from which CM is loaded and init is started again.

Letama explains the workaround best with the following:

Stock kernel is calling /system/bin/pre_hw_config.sh in its initramfs, we hijack the script to replace stock behavior to launch cm. To do that, I do it in two steps, first, pre_hw_config.sh will grab step2.sh and busybox from /system/bin, copy them to /tmp, relink busybox applets then launch step2.sh. Step2.sh will grab /system/bin/cm.tar, extract it to / then umount everything to start init again.

The ROM itself is essentially daily-driver capable, with essentially everything working and great performance and stability. However, a few users are reporting occasional random freezes, which can be attributed to some rendering issues. Luckily, there is an incredibly simple build.prop workaround that was mentioned by Senior Member piyush95 that seems to fix this.

If you have a locked Xperia S and want to enjoy the AOSP-derived CM10 goods, head over to the ROM thread and give this a shot. And while this is exciting in and of itself, the potential for other ROMs to build off of djolivier and letama’s workaround is the most exciting part. It’s therefore entirely possible for other developers to get KitKat working on locked Xperia S units using this workaround!

[Many thanks to LLy_BosHi for the tip!]

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ZOOvOxB

If own a Sony Xperia device and have switched out your ROM for an AOSP-derived firmware such as CyanogenMod, you may miss a few OEM-provided pieces of software from time to time. Some of the interesting value-added software provided by Sony include their “small apps,” as well as their upgraded task switcher.

Thankfully, XDA Senior Member lukakas has created a guide to help you port these Sony-specific additions to CyanogenMod 10.1 (and perhaps any ROM based on Android 4.2.2). More specifically, the guide allows you to bring the Sony Xperia Z-specific versions of those addons.

The guide is extremely well written, and even features a helpful YouTube video that shows some of these additions in action. The guide walks you through the process of decompiling and modifying android.policy.jar, framework.jar, framework-res.apk, and SystemUI.apk. All of the modifications as well as what to do afterward are clearly outlined and color coded.

Head over to the tutorial thread to get started. Kudos to lukaskas for the well written and easy-to-follow instructions.

Screenshot_2013-03-11-21-03-07

If you’re a former CyanogenMod user whose ORD has resulted in a move to another ROM or if you’ve simply changed devices to one without officially supported CM builds, you’re in for a treat.

Undoubtedly, one of the most visually striking parts of CyangoenMod as of late is its cLock home and lock screen widget. For those with an eye for the visually pleasing, cLock offers a clean and information-rich interface. And for those who like to stand out, it’s quite customizable in both color and content. Sadly though, changing ROMs generally means doing away with ROM-specific perks.

Thankfully, this is no longer a problem, as XDA Recognized Developer (and CyanogenMod UI and Experience Team Developer) DvTonder has posted the home and lock screen widget for use with any device running Android 4.2 or greater. Developed primarily by DvTonder, with help from a host of other developers, the widget packs time, weather, and calendar event information in a streamlined and configurable package. And though it’s been available in standalone form since March of this year, the developer keeps posting revisions and updates, with the most recent bringing some small UI changes, bugfixes, and new translations.

Head over to the original thread to enjoy one of the cleanest and most configurable home and lock screen clock widgets available.

unnamed

PIE Controls and HALO are two open source innovations created by the Paranoid Android team that are just unquestionably awesome. However, as awesome as they are, you may not want them enabled at all times. Enabling and disabling them only takes a few taps and not much effort, but it can be made even easier.

If you frequently enable and disable PIE and/or HALO, XDA Forum Member filipkowicz‘s latest app PA Shortcuts may be exactly what you need. The app allows you to toggle PIE mode (full screen), HALO, HALO hide, and HALO reverse control.

So how do you access these shortcuts? Simple. You can either drag the shortcuts to your desktop like standard apps. However, if your launcher supports gestures, the preferred way of accessing the shortcuts is to launch the shortcuts that way. As described by the developer:

Best way to use them is attach them to gestures in your launcher but you can place them on homescreen like any other shortcuts. Moreover app can create one fake “APP” which make the same thing as shortcuts but system treat it as regular APP so you can attach this APP to HALO with HALO))) app.

To get started, head over to the original thread.

cm

We’ve featured various large-scale, cross-device ROMs on the Portal throughout the years, but it’s hard to argue that any particular ROM has earned the notoriety seen by CyanogenMod. After humble beginnings on the T-Mobile G1, CyanogenMod has grown into a huge project kept alive by dozens of developers throughout the world. In fact, today’s release is available for 40 devices at the time of writing.

So what’s the significance of CyanogenMod 10.1.0? Aside from being based on Android 4.2.2, this is the first time since Ice Cream Sandwich that Release Candidate nomenclature has been used. And coming in as one of the final milestone releases prior to the official release of CM10.1, one can be almost assured of a relatively bug-free experience.

Anyway, that’s enough yapping. Most of you flashaholics can’t wait to get started. More information can be found in the official CyanogenMod blog. To get started with the downloads, visit the CyanogenMod Mirror Network directly. Those looking discuss your findings can undoubtedly do so within the device-specific forums on XDA. And most importantly, if you find yourself grateful for these developers’ tireless efforts make sure you donate to the team.

xda-cm-pa-oppo-collab.fw

Here at XDA, you’ve probably seen us talk about collaboration. The dictionary defines collaborating as “to work with another or others on a joint project.” We take collaboration seriously, so much so that we actually frown when we see members of the community not take it as seriously. What makes us even more upset is when manufacturers don’t take it seriously, though that rant is for another day.

There have been numerous instances of OEMs that have claimed to be “developer-friendly,” but whose actions spoke louder than their words. On the other hand, there are only a few instances of OEMs actually having their actions match their words, with one of those being Sony over the last 12-18 months and another being a relatively new entry to the Android world, Chinese manufacturer Oppo. If you recall we’ve spent some time discussing Oppo’s recent wins in the Android space, not the least of which is their GPLv2-required release of kernel source for the Find 5. On the surface this is not that noteworthy given it should already be done by default, however with Chinese manufacturers that is not a given. Given the negative track record of Chinese manufacturers adhering to licensing, Oppo is doing something extraordinarily rare by signaling a desire to position themselves in the Western market. Unlike other Chinese companies (Huawei comes to mind), Oppo is showing they have some understanding of, or are attempting to learn, what it takes to succeed.

As OEM Relations Manager for XDA, it is my job to contact OEMs and build a dialog with them. This usually starts with establishing a relationship where XDA, with its 5 million users and tremendous independent developers, and the respective OEM can begin to discuss ways to collaborate (there’s that word again) on win/win opportunities. Sometimes it is met with open arms, as has been the case with Oppo. When approached with the idea to work together with XDA in growing development, we immediately began to discuss ways to facilitate collaboration (!) to bring about a good relationship with the developer community.  We also knew that in order to make any collaboration a win/win for both parties, there would have to be value for the OEM.

After those initial discussions, I spoke with some veteran CyanogenMod maintainers (and members of the now-defunct Team Hacksung) XDA Elite Recognized Developer Entropy512, and Recognized Developers XpLodWILD and nebkat, about their interest in taking on a new device and bringing CM to it. All three were definitely interested, and I began working together with them and Oppo to make it happen. After a few weeks, CM10.1 was brought to Nightly status by the team.

Oppo was ecstatic, and so recently I reached out to XDA Recognized Developers, and Paranoid Android developers, molesarecoming and aaronpoweruser, about their interest in such a project. As was expected, their answer was in the affirmative. And after just a few days, aaronpoweruser posted on G+ that he was close to having an alpha build of PA soon.

All of this hasn’t come easily though, given the state of Oppo’s kernel source. The kernel source that was released was not fully GPLv2 compliant as it was released late (though better than some other companies we could name), had different config files (debug worked, release didn’t), and the kernel source has not been updated even after they’ve made kernel updates on recent firmware updates. With all that being said, the teams have done a great job bringing their respective projects to where they are today. And with language and cultural barriers between our developers and theirs being what they are, Oppo does appear to be trying to overcome those issues.

We know you look forward to seeing the great things that are bound to come out of this collaboration. And to the other OEMs out there, take this as a suggestion: It doesn’t hurt to embrace the developer community, and only makes your stock rise in the eyes of that community. When that happens, the word will spread, and consumers (who incidentally are highly influenced by what members of that developer community have to say about your products) will follow with their currency. It’s a cycle which can, and should, be repeated. If you’re interested, contact me and XDA.

UbuntuTouch_newskin

Since the dawn of Android tablets, and really ever since the HTC HD2, developers have been looking for ways to bring Ubuntu to the mobile space. It seems like every new device gets a thread devoted to showing users how to load Ubuntu. More often than not, that implementation requires you to boot Android and then utilize chroot in order to run a Ubuntu instance, but that doesn’t change the fact you’re still running Android.

So when news of Ubuntu Touch coming to the Galaxy Nexus, Nexus 4, Nexus 7 and Nexus 10 reached the interwebz, a collective shout of “Yippee!” erupted from the ranks. Then earlier this week Canonical, the creators of Ubuntu, teased us with a video showing Ubuntu Touch in all its glory on a tablet.

On Thursday, Canonical released instructions for installing the Developer Preview on the Nexus devices, and the XDA thread erupted with discussion around it. Then as people began to install the Developer Preview on their devices, one thing became very clear: While a lot of the data being shown in the video looked real, it all exists in the Developer Preview as dummy data. It’s not functional, and is not intended for the user as was displayed. No, this is very clearly an alpha and not intended for the normal user or as a daily-driver. It even is clear that Android is very much part of Ubuntu Touch, even down to a stripped down version of CM10.1 as the base, and chroot is still the process used to run Ubuntu, albeit in a much nicer (and cleaner) boot process.

On Friday they released the porting instructions and another suspicion was confirmed: If your device is in the CM10.1 device tree and can run CM10.1, you too can port Ubuntu Touch to your device relatively easily. And in Friday’s hangout that the Ubuntu Development team hosted they discussed the following key points (props to XDA Senior Member KMyers for not only joining the hangout, but also typing up the results):

Question : Is Ubuntu Touch stable enough for a Daily Driver?
Answer : No, most of the core “Applications” are non-functional . There is also no support for 3G Data

Question : What Devices can Ubuntu Touch Be Ported to?
Answer : As the Ubuntu Touch Preview is simply running in a Cyanogenmod10.1 chroot, theoretically you can port Ubuntu Touch to any device that Cyanogemod 10.1 Supports. Development happened on ICS and eventually moved to JB. Keep in mind that performance may vary. Instructions to port Ubuntu Touch can be found at https://wiki.ubuntu.com/Touch/Porting

Question : Since this is running in a Cyanogenmod chroot, can it run Native Android Apps?
Answer : No – The Cyanogenmod Fork has been stripped of the Dalvik VM and all other components necessary to run Android Applications. There is a likely possibility that someone will develop a “bluestacks” like emulator to allow android applications to run, but this will most likely not come from the Ubuntu team. 

Question : Is dual booting possible?
Answer : Yes, thanks to the effort of the people at XDA-Developers, Dual Booting is possible. With this said, this is not something that the Ubuntu Team has any intentions of officially supporting. While Ubuntu seems to encourage community efforts, they stress that they do not want this to become a feature that the end user will expect to see officially supported. (I bet you all wish you got the 32 GB Nexus 7 or Nexus 10 rather then the 16 GB)

Question : Is the Ubuntu Touch UI using X11 or Wayland?
Answer : None of the Above. Ubuntu Touch is using the same Display Manager that is in use by Android, Display Flinger.

Question : What Kernel is in Use?
Answer : A modified Android Kernel is in use

Question : What about CDMA support?
Answer : Fear Not Sprint and Verizon users, it is being worked on. The Ubuntu Team said that the GSM Radio is the global standard and this was simply where they focused most of their attention as all of the developers had GSM devices. 

Question : Will Ubuntu be accepting merge requests for the Cyanogen10.1 sub system?
Answer : Yes, this is encouraged.

Question : Where is the Ubuntu chroot kept in relationship to Android?
Answer : The Ubuntu filesystem and all applications are kept in /data/ubuntu . If you use adb to browse this, you will see a familiar filesystem layout that most Linux users are used to 

Question : What Works?
Answer : As this is a Developer Build, dont expect much to work. The items that have been confirmed to work are;

  • Touchscreen
  • Sound (over speakers)
  • Display
  • Internet Browser
  • WiFi (No WPS)
  • Camera (Front and Back)
  • Video Player
  • ADB
  • Screen Brightness Controls
  • Automatic Brightness
  • Speech Driven HUD (Yes, it works)
  • GSM Voice (No APN Settings)
  • The SideStage Seems to be working

Question : What Does Not Work?
Answer : As this is a developer build, dont expect things to work properly, here are a few things that are not working

  • 3G/4G Data
  • Audio Out via Headphones
  • HDMI
  • Bluetooth
  • Most Applications and Menus
  • Charging Indicator
  • Software Center (Note : You can install simple shell applications via apt-get install … once inside the chroot)
  • Most applications are placeholders
  • MMS
  • CDMA Connections
  • SIM Storage
  • Auto Rotation (Or any rotation for that matter)
  • Random Crashes when swiping
  • Notifications (All of them are placeholders)
  • Most Applications that do function are web apps like m.gmail.com.
  • NFC

The issue with the release is that the focus in the video was that these features were working and is what would be deployed. What is painfully obvious instead is that the video highlighting those features was just PR and nothing else. Virtually none of the features displayed in the video even work, even on devices like the Nexus lineup that are generally the easiest to develop for, and already fully work on CM10.1. In fact, the calendar app is just a PNG placeholder and does not even function.

This doesn’t mean that we feel that there isn’t a future for this platform, but it does mean that there are definitely opportunities to improve. Here at XDA we publicly reach out and offer our services to the Ubuntu Touch project. We have more experience in the mobile development and mobile telephony space than most outfits, and have a lot to offer in what could be a tremendous collaboration. We look forward to seeing what such a collaboration would produce.

App-dev-tablet-GoMobile

The release of the Ubuntu Touch Developer Preview yesterday prompted a lot of activity on the Ubuntu Touch forum, and for good reason. The concept of Ubuntu on phones and tablets has been desired by many for a long time, and so it is great to see Canonical embrace the idea and set out on their own.

When Ubuntu posted the announcement about the Developer Preview, they mentioned that they would be releasing the instructions on how to port Ubuntu Touch to other devices other than the Galaxy NexusNexus 4Nexus 7 and Nexus 10. Today they did so, and as we mentioned yesterday, they will be holding a “Ubuntu On-Air” at 15:00 GMT today (Friday, February 22) where they’ll have two of the lead developers in a Google Hangout to talk about the project as well. For those that miss it, they will surely have a replay available at that address as well.

The instructions for porting are pretty straightforward. Since Ubuntu Touch is just a CyanogenMod 10.1 base with the Ubuntu Touch interface running in a container and accessed via chroot, if your device currently runs CM10.1 then you’ll be able to port this. The instructions for porting are found on Ubuntu’s Wiki and are quite extensive, so make sure you follow them EXACTLY.

logo

When in the course of developing from source, it can become quite cumbersome to find that specific code reference or symbol that is either causing you problems or is the one thing you’re missing. You often find yourself browsing through line after line of code, hoping you don’t miss that snippet you’re looking for. This can get frustrating, and very tiresome, to say the least. With a new set of websites, your life might just get a little simpler.

BBQSauce is a website that allows you to search (and browse) the CM source tree for just about anything. Let’s say that I am working on telephony in CyangoenMod 10.1 and I want to find all instances of the TelephonyProperties string. I would go to the BBQSauce site and type that into the Full Search box, select the corresponding project name (abi, android, bionic, etc.), and then hit search and wait. What would return for me would be each file with all respective entries in each file where my search string showed up, grouped by directory in the source code. Each of those entries are clickable, meaning I will be taken right to the line in the source code where my search string is found.

AndroidXRef is another resource that can be extremely helpful, providing the AOSP source (from 1.6 to 4.2) and the Linux kernel source (versions 2.6.39, 3.0, 3.3 and 3.4) in a browsable and searchable format. Again, AndroidXRef operates in the same way that BBQSauce does, as they both use Oracle’s {OpenGrok source browser.

Both systems provide you with a handy resource at your disposal, one of which can make the life of a developer much easier. In addition, they’ll be able to spend more time making bacon.

[Featured image courtesy of AndroidXRef]

CM10.1

Anyone who has spent time on XDA, or in the Android community at large, knows that when a device receives inclusion in CyanogenMod’s device tree, it is a beautiful day. This is because CM support ensures that the device will have a longer-than-manufacturer-intended lifespan. This of course depends on the manufacturer providing the tools and documentation necessary for development to occur. In many cases, OEMs do a pretty good job at publishing the documentation for instances in which they deviate from the reference design of a device’s board. Other times, however, manufacturers seem to go into brain fart-mode when it comes to this.

Samsung, in their infinite wisdom, has made it extremely difficult for devices based on the Exynos 4 reference design to receive CyanogenMod 10.x nightlies. This is not new news, as it’s been well-covered that Samsung continues to fail the community when it comes to devices based on their Exynos 4×12 devices (Galaxy S3, Galaxy Note 10.1, Galaxy Note 2, Galaxy Camera, Meizu MX). The sources from Samsung are consistently missing required pieces in order to be GPL-compliant, and recent investigations have found Gingerbread-remnants in their ICS sources.

All of that has not deterred XDA Recognized Developers espenfjo and Entropy512 from diligently laboring to bring the CM10.1 experience to the Galaxy Note 10.1. There have been obstacles, but they have pressed through. Thanks to their work, the Note 10.1 (N80o0 GSM and N8010/N8013 WiFi) recently began to receive CyanogenMod nightlies. As of the time of this posting, there are issues with Netflix working on CM10.1 but Entropy512 has put together a workaround for all Exynos 4 devices via the Xposed framework.

As is always the case, the typical disclaimers apply as CM10.1 is a work-in-progress, especially on these devices. So if you have a bug to report, make sure you post a logcat in the thread with a detailed description of what you were doing and what happened. In order to flash the builds, you will need to use either TWRP or  Entropy’s CWM build because they are the only ones that are confirmed to work at this time. If you receive an ‘assert failed‘ error message, you should first confirm that you are indeed using one of the two aforementioned recoveries.

Jordan111

Back from International CES, XDA News Specialist Jordan is here to cover all the news from XDA that you may have missed. He talks about unlocking the bootloaders on the Galaxy Nexus, Nexus 4, and Nexus 10 without using Fastboot. In other XDA Developer TV videos from this week, Jordan released a recap from the press events of International CES, XDA Elite Recognized Developer AdamOutler made a video on Hacking the Galaxy Camera, and XDA Developer TV Producer TK put out an app review of Kii Keyboard.

In CyanogenMod 10.1 news, Jordan talks about the unofficial release for the Galaxy Player 5 and Straight Talk Galaxy S II. Also, Jordan mentions quad-booting the Nook Tablet. Pull up a chair and check out this video.

READ ON »

CM for Straight Talk SGS2 & Galaxy Player 5

Lately, several devices have been getting Jelly Bean in form of CM 10 and CM 10.1 ports. Recently, we brought you unofficial CM10.1 ports for the Nook HD+ and Samsung Galaxy Fit. Now, the Galaxy Player 5 and Strait Talk Galaxy S2 have joined the club, thanks to unofficial ports by XDA Forum Members Mevordel and mr-cook, respectively.

The Straight Talk SGS2 port is based on Android 4.2.1, and should work fine as a daily driver. The developer also provides several other useful goodies in the thread, including ClockworkMod recovery, stock and AOSP modems, and the stock factory image and flashing instructions to get a clean start.

Moving on to the Galaxy Player 5 port, it’s an early release with a lot of work yet to be done to make it suitable enough for daily use. Currently Bluetooth, Camera, and the earpiece aren’t functional. You do, however, get sound through the speaker on the back. The capacitive buttons are also not working on international version, and only earphones with a built-in microphone work. The port is still work in progress, and hopefully these issues will be sorted out soon in a future release.

As always, more information and download links can be found at the Galaxy Player 5 and Straight Talk SGS2 threads.

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