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Posts Tagged: CyanogenMod 10.2

xperia-sp-gallery-03-1240x840-d7e2aa448eaf57d4987333fc073131b2-155437

Sony released quite a few of interesting devices in 2013. One of the most successful was the Xperia SP, a device that easily can compete with Nexus 4 and other relatively powerful smartphones. Not too long ago, the Xperia SP was updated to Android 4.3. This gave developers an opportunity to cross more boundaries and limitations.

Xperia devices, although capable of being unlocked, are often locked by carriers. That makes developing for those devices harder, as custom kernels can’t be flashed. All Xperia SP owners with locked bootloaders now have a reason to smile. XDA Forum Member bagyusz used a method developed by XDA Recognized Developer KeiranFTW to create a build of CyanogenMod 10.2 available for locked Xperias.

The ROM uses 2nd-init method, which basically loads a second ramdisk on top of stock kernel. It’s not a new method and was used with an old line of msm7x27 Sony Ericsson devices in the past, but works great and even allows porting newer versions of Android with external kernel modules. A great majority of device features are working already, and the only noticeable bug is GPS. However, the build is quite early and this might be resolved at any moment.

If you are a happy owner of a locked SP, make your way to the development thread to try out some AOSP-derived goodness on your device.

[Thanks to XDA Senior Member mrjraider for the news tip!]

SGSP11

If you rewind back to a couple of months ago, you may remember that dual boot was achieved on the Samsung Galaxy S Plus. Well, there’s been more happening with this device, the refresh of the perhaps more popular Samsung Galaxy S. Shipped all the way back in 2011 with Android 2.3.3 Gingerbread, it only received an incremental, official update to Android 2.3.6 before being discontinued by Samsung.

Fortunately however, Galaxy S Plus owners will see the abandoned device get back on its feet and march on, as XDA Recognized Developers CastagnaIT, Christopher83, educk and ivendor, and Recognized Contributor krislibaeer have teamed up as DevConnection_Team and delivered the latest iteration of Android, 4.4.2 Kitkat to the Galaxy S Plus. The ROM comes as an unofficial CyanogenMod 11 build, and is currently in its beta phase, but despite this, the rom seems to be stable with all of the major functions working as they should. The working list so far includes:

  • Audio
  • Calls
  • GPS
  • Compass
  • Proximity sensor
  • Wifi
  • Bluetooth
  • USB mass storage
  • CameraUSB/Wifi tethering
  • USB OTG (Only FAT32 supported as of now)
  • MicroSD exFAT support

This is quite the achievement, as this was only possible with a hybrid memory allocation solution involving both ION and PMEM memory allocation, with the latter only required for the camera librarys and drivers. Thanks to this solution, this team of developers were also able to bring unofficial builds of CyanogenMod 10.1 and 10.2 to the Galaxy S Plus.

If you would like to find out more on the development progress, visit the respective forum threads for more details:

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N1_CMprodpageOS_01

Just two days ago, we talked about the release of the Oppo N1 CyanogenMod Edition, as well as its factory images and source code. While the device’s large dimensions make it somewhat of a niche device, the N1 is a device aimed to please those looking for a very large phone. The N1 is also great for those who value support from an OEM that actively caters to the development and enthusiast communities.

Alongside the release of the N1 CM Edition, Oppo stated that an official CM build for the standard edition device would be released shortly. Now two days later, they have made good on their promise, thanks to a complete update that removes the default ColorOS in favor of the AOSP-derived CyanogenMod 10.2.

It is important to note that to install the official CM build, you should be on stock software and with stock recovery. If you need to revert to stock recovery after having flashed an aftermarket recovery such as TWRP, head over to XDA Recognized Contributor Harfainx‘s stock recovery thread to revert back to stock. Once you have the stock recovery installed, download the CM package from the source link and perform a local update from the System Update utility.

If you’re a standard edition Oppo N1 owner lusting after the CM Edition, today’s your lucky day. Leave us your thoughts in the comments below, and don’t forget to head over to the Oppo N1 forums to get in on the discussion!

[Source: Oppo Forums]

N1_CMprodpageOS_01

The almost ludicriously sized Oppo N1 isn’t exactly a device aimed at everyone. No, its gargantuan dimensions simply preclude it from much mass market appeal. But for those of you who can handle the device’s macroscopic proportions, Christmas has come a little early—one day early, to be exact.

Earlier today, the CyanogenMod team announced that a version of the N1 with CyanogenMod 10.2 preinstalled has just gone on sale. The device is available directly on the Oppo Style website for $600 US. But for that price, and at with such large dimensions, it’s difficult to imagine the N1 CM Edition displacing the crowd favorite Nexus 5 any time soon. In any case, this is still a momentous occasion, as the N1 CM Edition is now the first device to come bundled with CyanogenMod, as well as the first time that CyanogenMod has come with bundled Gapps since Google’s C&D letter many years ago

In order to keep everything as open as possible, the CM team has already provided factory images for the CM Edition of the device, as well as kernel and device-specific source code. This is, of course, for the preinstalled CM 10.2-flavored build of AOSP-derived Jelly Bean goodness. And for those who would like to try their hand at cooking up a KitKat ROM for the device, the CM team has provided apq8064-common device source code.

Are you thinking of picking up an Oppo N1 CM Edition? If you do, will you shout out an endless stream of cheesy Oppo CyanogenMod Style jokes? Let us know in the comments below. And for those of you who may have missed it, be sure to check out our recent review of the standard version of the device.

[Source: Factory Images, GitHub (1, 2, 3), Oppo Style | Via CyanogenMod Blog]

Capture

While secure text messaging systems have been available on Android for quite some time, many users (even power users) have failed to set them up on their devices. This isn’t because privacy isn’t important, but it’s often one of those things you don’t think of until it’s too late.

Now, CyanogenMod is taking a great first step by incorporating an existing and open source secure text messaging platform into CyanogenMod. The integration comes in the form of TextSecure, which is maintained by Open WhisperSystems and lead engineer Moxie Marlinspike. Moxie is also in charge of the CM integration of the app, ensuring functionality and a degree of security. New to the CM implementation is SMS middleware functionality. This functions similarly to the Google Voice integration in CyanogenMod.

The way it will work for end users is simple: If you are running CM and send a message to another CM or TextSecure user, your messages will be automatically encrypted and secured. However, if your messages are sent to recipients without either, a standard unencrypted text message will be sent.

Now, you might be wondering when you can get your hands on these goods. Luckily, You just have to make your way over to GitHub (12) if you’re a developer looking to incorporate the code into your own work, or if you simply want to snoop around. And if you’re an end user, rest assured that the latest CM10.2 nightlies already feature TextSecure integration. Integration into CM11 is coming soon as well, depending on how things go with the CM10.2 integration.

[Source GitHub (12) | Via CyanogenMod Blog]

Screenshot_2013-03-11-21-03-07

If you’re a former CyanogenMod user whose ORD has resulted in a move to another ROM or if you’ve simply changed devices to one without officially supported CM builds, you’re in for a treat.

Undoubtedly, one of the most visually striking parts of CyangoenMod as of late is its cLock home and lock screen widget. For those with an eye for the visually pleasing, cLock offers a clean and information-rich interface. And for those who like to stand out, it’s quite customizable in both color and content. Sadly though, changing ROMs generally means doing away with ROM-specific perks.

Thankfully, this is no longer a problem, as XDA Recognized Developer (and CyanogenMod UI and Experience Team Developer) DvTonder has posted the home and lock screen widget for use with any device running Android 4.2 or greater. Developed primarily by DvTonder, with help from a host of other developers, the widget packs time, weather, and calendar event information in a streamlined and configurable package. And though it’s been available in standalone form since March of this year, the developer keeps posting revisions and updates, with the most recent bringing some small UI changes, bugfixes, and new translations.

Head over to the original thread to enjoy one of the cleanest and most configurable home and lock screen clock widgets available.

Jordan0816

CyanogenMod 10.2 nightlies are now available for various devices. That and more are covered by Jordan, as he reviews all the important stories from this weekend. Included in this week’s news is an article about an Android Bitcoin vulnerability and news about an Ubuntu Touch app for browsing the XDA forums.

Jordan talks about the other videos released this week on XDA Developer TV. XDA Developer TV Producer Kevin released a video showing how to root and install a custom recovery on the Oppo Find 5, Jordan reviewed XDA:DevCon, and later, TK showed how to get back the AOSP Browser. Pull up a chair and check out this video.

READ ON »

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Ever since the release of Android 4.3 a few weeks ago, most device owners have been impatiently waiting for their slice of the pie. No, not key lime pie; but sweet 4.3 goodness, nonetheless. Of course, with dedicated teams of aftermarket firmware developers such as CyanogenMod, Paranoid Android, and AOKP, we all knew that it was only a matter of time.

Well, that day is now here, as Android 4.3 has made it to various handsets by way of CyanogenMod 10.2 nightlies for various devices. So what devices are supported? Quite a few, actually. A full build roster is not yet available, but according to the CyanogenMod Google+:

Tonight, we are not building for every device we support – there are always some stragglers. The rest will come when they are given the green light and that will happen when they are ready. …

As these builds are in progress (and some may fail) a full 10.2 build roster will be posted later.

And a quick glance at the CyanogenMod Mirror Network shows that quite a bit of progress has been made in the migration. However, this is all old news to at-home builders and kang-bangers, as stated by the CyanogenMod Blog on August 9th:

In the meantime, the majority of our 10.1 roster have transitioned to being 10.2 capable. This means for you at-home builders, things should be in a fairly good spot for your own personal builds.

To get the (prebuilt) goods on your own device, hit up the CyanogenMod Mirror Network to see if your handset is one of the chosen devices. Be sure to leave your thoughts in your home device forum, as well as in the comment box below. Developers looking to merge the changes into their own builds or just in it to learn a bit more about what went into 10.2 can head over to the CyanogenMod Gerrit.

A list of the devices that have already received the goods can be found below.

  • Amazon Kindle Fire (1st gen)
  • Amazon Kindle Fire (2nd gen)
  • Barnes & Noble Nook HD+
  • Google Galaxy Nexus (GSM)
  • Google Galaxy Nexus (Verizon)
  • Google Nexus 10
  • Google Nexus 4
  • HTC One (AT&T)
  • HTC One (GSM)
  • HTC One (Sprint)
  • HTC One (T-Mobile)
  • LG Optimus 4X HD
  • LG Optimus L9
  • Motorola Droid 4
  • Motorola Droid Bionic
  • Motorola Droid Razr
  • Motorola Razr
  • Samsung Galaxy Note (AT&T)
  • Samsung Galaxy Note (Intl)
  • Samsung Galaxy Note (T-Mobile)
  • Samsung Galaxy Note II (AT&T)
  • Samsung Galaxy Note II (GSM LTE)
  • Samsung Galaxy Note II (T-Mobile)
  • Samsung Galaxy S II (G)
  • Samsung Galaxy S II (Intl)
  • Samsung Galaxy S III (GSM LTE)
  • Samsung Galaxy S III (Intl)
  • Samsung Galaxy S4 (AT&T)
  • Samsung Galaxy S4 (Canada)
  • Samsung Galaxy S4 (Sprint)
  • Samsung Galaxy S4 (T-Mobile)
  • Samsung Galaxy S4 (US Cellular)
  • Samsung Galaxy S4 (Verizon)
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 2 7.0 (GSM)
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 2 7.0 (Wi-Fi)
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab2 10.1 (GSM)
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab2 10.1 (Wi-Fi)
  • Sony Xperia Tablet Z
  • Sony Xperia Z
  • Sony Xperia ZL
2013-07-30

Thanks to the hard work of CyanogenMod’s development team, a slew of devices are now able to run Project Nemesis Phase 1: Focal. CyanogenMod developer Guillaume Lesniak (XDA Recognized Developer XpLoDWilD) announced July 29 that the new camera application was pushed to the official CyanogenMod repositories, and to CM-10.2 builds. Although possible to build Focal for CM-10.1, Lesniak said the team will not be supporting it due to their significant progress with 10.2.

Even though Focal still has quite a few bugs to work out, the new features will surely whet your appetite until it is 100 percent stable. Lesniak said they are aware of all bugs and asked that users not report their findings until otherwise notified.  He also said they will not be providing support to unofficial builds and those that are not running CyanogenMod.

While there are no plans to publish Focal on the Play Store, many XDA users have already extracted the APK in order to make it available to everyone. Since its release, device-specific threads containing the Focal.apk file have been popping up all over XDA.

To download Focal and to add your feedback on the application, visit XDA Recognized Contributor Garner‘s thread or any other device-specific thread.

 

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