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Posts Tagged: CyanogenMod 10

MiniCM10 for Xperia X8

Ever since the release of Jelly Bean source code to AOSP, ports for various devices have been popping up frequently. Sony Ericsson Xperia X8 owners waiting to get a stable build of Jelly Bean on their devices need wait no longer, as  nAa Jelly Bean kernel and MiniCM10 ROM bring the latest version of Android and CyanogenMod 10 to their devices.

Developed by XDA Recognized Developer nobodyAtall, the nAa custom Jelly Bean Kernel prepares your X8 for Jelly Bean ROMs by setting up the custom partitioning required for JB ROM installation. It also comes bundled with ClockworkMod recovery. To install this kernel, you must have your bootloader unlocked. After that, proceed to the kernel installation, and you will be ready to install Jelly Bean ROMs on your device.

Want a good ROM to start with? The same developer released MiniCM10 for the X8, which brings features of CyanogenMod 10 to the device. While we have previously featured an unofficial CM10 ROM for the X8, that ROM lacked a working camera and FM Radio. Both ROMs, however, currently lack hardware video encoding and decoding. Head over to the ROM’s discussion thread for the download link and installation instructions.

official-htc-hero-011

Way back in 2009, HTC released their third Android smartphone, the HTC Hero. The device shipped with Android 1.5 (Cupcake) or 2.1 (Eclair). Yes, that’s how long ago it was! In it’s day, it was a very popular device here on XDA, attracting a good number of developers. But as with all older devices, it has since slipped by the wayside and has become somewhat forgotten. For most people, that is.

Within the last few months, both the CDMA and GSM versions of the Hero have received both Ice Cream Sandwich and, more incredibly, Jelly Bean custom ROMs added to their arsenal.

For the CDMA version, XDA Senior Member tvall brings us Ice Cream Sandwich based CyanogenMod 9. Development has slowed of late, but the ROM appears to be functional, with only camera and USB mass storage not functioning.

CyanogenMod 9 on the GSM Hero is brought to us by XDA Senior Member jordfaz. Again, there are a few minor issues, such as GPS and hardware acceleration, as well as some minor issues with the camera. Despite this, the ROM is otherwise functional.

XDA Senior Member Shelnutt2 has gone one step further and has brought Jelly Bean to the CDMA Hero in the form of CyanogenMod 10. Of course with builds of this nature, there are a number of known issues, such as audio, camera and hardware acceleration, but these are being worked on by a number of members in the ROM thread.

Not to be outdone, the GSM Hero also has CyanogenMod 10 thanks to XDA Senior Member jordfaz. Based on the CDMA version mentioned above, the same known issues apply. The ROM is an alpha build and should only be flashed if you wish to help with development or provide feedback.

If you’re an HTC Hero owner and want to try out one of these newer Android flavors, head over to one of the development threads:

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jordan

This has been another great week at the XDA Portal. XDA Developer TV Producer Jordan covers all the news you need to know to keep you updated. Jordan talks about remotely controlling your Samsung device with your desktop computer. Jordan mentions the other great video released this week be other XDA Developer TV Producers. Azrienoch released his discussion about the Sony Xperia S being added to the Android Open Source Project, XDA Elite Recognized Developer AdamOutler released his Verizon Samsung Galaxy S III unboxing video and TK release his latest app review video.

In Jelly Bean news, Jordan mentions the test build for the Verizon Galaxy Nexus and a version for the Motorola Droid. And in CyanogenMod 10 news, Jordan mentions three HTC devices and a Samsung device getting versions. Pull up a chair and check out this video.

 

READ ON »

tapp

While CyanogenMod 10 becomes the norm for many cutting-edge device, it appears that CyanogenMod 9.1 still has a trick up its sleeve when it debuts. In an industry first, CyanogenMod (a community-maintained Android ROM that isn’t directly affiliated with the AOSP) has partnered with NFC cloud-based payment company SimplyTapp to produce a new method of paying for real goods and services with NFC-capable devices.

Much like Google Wallet, Google’s NFC payment system, SimplyTapp allows users of NFC capable devices (flashed with CM 9.1) to store payment method information in the cloud. By installing the app and signing up for a card ($0 to $5 depending on the type of card, with fixed amount gift cards, re-loadable cards and some local store cards available) your device can be used in a similar fashion to a debit or credit card but with the added simplicity of waving your NFC capable device to make a payment and the added security of storing your payment information in the cloud until needed.

According to the announcement at the Cyanogenmod homepage, enhancements to the Ice Cream Sandwich NFC stack were necessary to make this service work, and those changes have been implemented in the upcoming CyanogenMod 9.1 release. CyanogenMod 10, which is based on Jelly Bean (Android 4.1), will eventually see Tapp as well, but not until changes to the AOSP Jelly Bean tree slow down.

The announcement also mentions that while CM 9.1 will not contain new features, it ushers in a host of bug-fixes. This also serves as an indicator that  new features will no longer be introduced to CM9.

CyanogenMod users who want to try the SimplyTapp system can upgrade their supported devices to CyanogenMod 9.1 and install the Tapp app from the Play Store.

cyanogenmod-team-details-plans-for-android-and-cm_irfn-_0

The CyanogenMod crew has added four new devices to their officially supported lineup. This is exciting news, considering the popularity of the devices in question. These four flagship-status devices are some of the most widely-used phones on the market today. The list of devices and maintainers is as follows:

This is great news for owners of these devices, since the aforementioned HTC and Samsung devices natively run HTC Sense and Samsung TouchWiz, respectively. Many users prefer a fully functional AOSP-based build to these bloated default ROMs, and CyanogenMod 10 fits the bill as an Android 4.1 ROM with some discrete, yet highly functional modifications. Keep your eye on the device forums to catch the latest release candidates, and try not to ask for ETAs!

JBCM10

When Jelly Bean source was first released, XDA members wasted no time putting it on anything and everything. This was also helped immensely by a guide by XDA Recognized Developer dastin1015 to help users learn to compile Jelly Bean. As Jelly Bean has become more commonplace around here, more device specific guides have been writte. Among the latest is a guide to compile CyanogenMod 10 for the Nexus 7.

The tutorial comes in a Google Document shared by XDA Recognized Developer fattire. To start, users need to be running Linux. Next, they simply follow the instructions and end up with a booting ROM. While we talk quite a bit about compiling source code here at XDA, fattire has compiled (see what I did there?) a list of reasons why compiling ROMs yourself is beneficial.

You never, ever have to wait for a nightly
You can add or remove as-yet uncommitted features with ease.
You learn how Android works under the hood
You learn how to use Linux
You’ll learn how to use git
You may, even accidentally, pick up a little C, Java, C++, and learn about the build system.
You can personalize Android– make your own tweaks, replace kernels, modules, graphics, add or remove projects, overclock, underclock etc. In other words, you have control over every aspect of your device’s functionality. Your build is custom to you.
You can audit the code for potential security issues such as back doors or trojans (as opposed to just trusting a random person who posts a build). Since CM10 source is open, you can examine every commit, and there are many eyes looking at the code. (does not apply to proprietary blobs, but these are pulled from your device, so you have and are using them already)
You can contribute features/fixes back upstream
You can start ports to other as-yet-unsupported devices (start by copying folders from similar devices to devices/manufacturer/model)
You come to really understand that Android phones and tablets are full-fledged general-purpose computers just like laptops and desktops.
AAAAND….you get huge bragging rights

So the question remains: What are you waiting for? Getting the latest CM on one of Android’s most loved tablets is as simple as following a Google Doc guide. To learn more, head to the original thread.

Jordan

This has been another great week for mobile development. XDA Developer TV Producer, and Level 14 half-elf wizard with a +5 staff of news summarizing, Jordan casts his spell of news gathering to keep you in the know. Jordan talks about the latest news in the mobile patent wars. Jordan mentions all the wonderful XDA Developer TV episodes from this week including Lance’s first episode of How to Build a Windows Phone App, Erica’s discussion of tempered and Gorilla glass, and TK’s review of the app ICS Browser+.

In CyanogenMod 10 news, Jordan mentions the HTC One V getting an unofficial CyanogenMod 10 port for both its CDMA and GSM variants. And in Jelly Bean news, Jordan mentions the Graphical User Interface to help manage Jelly Bean’s multi-account feature. Pull up a chair and check out this video.

 

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JBCM10

Very often, devices have multiple releases. It is not uncommon for the variants to have hardware differences, as is the case on the international HTC One X and the AT&T version. Often times, devices also feature different radios than their sibling device, as is the case with GSM and CDMA variants of the same phone. And since you generally can’t just flash one device’s development work on the other, there can be a gap at times between developer support on the devices. This doesn’t seem to be a problem for the HTC One V, as both versions have recently gotten unofficial ports of CyanogenMod 10. This is very much like when they got ICS Paranoid Android at the same time.

CyanogenMod 10 for the CDMA One V was released by XDA Recognized Contributor jmztaylor, while the GSM version is being handled by XDA Recognized Contributor Lloir. While there are different developers on each device, they’ve actually been working together along with a number of other developers and members to make the ROMs as stable as possible.

As we’ve been wont to point out, most Jelly Bean releases have been alphas or previews and haven’t been really stable enough for daily use. This is where the One V deviates, as both ROMs are surprisingly stable. Other than a few bugs here and there, the biggest issues reported have been the LCD backlight never turning off and the camcorder not working. Those are also the ones reported on just the CDMA version. If you don’t need camcorder and don’t mind the backlight issue, then these can be used daily. For more info, check out the CDMA One V thread or the GSM One V thread.

See You Next Time

Another Monday has come, and Jordan is here to recap the news you may have missed because of your exciting weekend plans. Jordan talks about the all-in-one toolkit for the Nexus 7. Jordan also mentions the Motorola unlocking tool and the review of the Meizu MX.

In CyanogenMod 10 news, Jordan mentions the release of CM10 nightlies and tries listing the list of available devices. Also in Jelly Bean news, the ASUS Transformer TF300T gets a release. Finally, Jordan talks Android market share. So take a sip of your Monday coffee and watch this video.

 

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CyanogenMod-10-CM10-Jelly-Bean

We recently told you about the CyanogenMod team beginning work on CM10. Now, a significant milestone has been reached: CM10 Nightlies have appeared for select devices. For those who aren’t familiar, a nightly build is an automatic build incorporating the latest changes in CM source for a device. Yesterday, CyanogenMod released the list of those devices that would be getting the first round of nightlies:

# The US SGS3 variants (AT&T, T-Mobile, Sprint)
# The Galaxy Nexus variants
# The Nexus S varaints
# The Nexus 7
# The Transformer and Transformer Prime
# The SGS1 variants (VibrantCaptivateInternational, and i9000b)
# The SGS2 i9100g
P3 and P5 tablets

That list will grow as other devices become ready and receive the blessing from their maintainers to begin nightlies. Be sure to keep your eyes open for when your device joins the list.

Update: We’ve received various reports from XDA Forum Member Scotto70 and others that the Nexus 7 build is currently nonfunctional. So if you’ve got a N7, we recommend that you hold off for the time being!

Giant Squid of Anger

Our friend Jordan loves rehashing the news so much that he did it twice for us today. After some technical annoyances and a snazzy haircut, Jordan finally gets a video to complete successfully. Today, Jordan gives a quick update of the awesome news that appeared on the XDA Portal like how CyanogenMod 10 was unofficially ported to the HTC G1.

Jordan mentions the HTC source petition and the Samsung Galaxy Note 10.1 rooting guide articles. Finally, Jordan mentions the Raspberry Pi’s upcoming update to Ice Cream Sandwich and XBMC ported to Android. What are you waiting for? Hit play!

 

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HTC G1 gets CM10 Jelly Bean Android

Some devices simply refuse to die, and the very first Android phone—the HTC G1—is one of them. It originally shipped with Android 1.0, and while it didn’t get an official update after Android 1.6 Donut, it has been running every version that the developer community here at XDA has been throwing at it. And now, the device has CyanogenMod 10-based Android 4.1 Jelly Bean ported to it!

Porting Jelly Bean to this device is a truly remarkable feat when you consider the humble specs of the device, which sports a 528 MHz processor, only 192 MB of RAM, and just 256 MB of internal storage space. However, that didn’t keep XDA Recognized Developer jcarrz1 and his team SoCal Devs from porting the latest version of Android to it.

Here is a video of the ROM in action on the G1:

The ROM is currently in pre-alpha, and there are a few features that don’t work yet such as cell service, data, and screen rotation. The speed leaves a lot to be desired as well, so don’t expect to use it as your daily driver. Rather, this is sort of a proof of concept saying that it can be done. Several key features such as the touch screen, WiFi, CM-specific tweaks and apps work fine, and even Google Now partially works!

You can download the ROM and install it to your G1 by following these instructions. For updates or feedback, head over to the discussion thread.

CM10

At this point, it just wouldn’t feel like summer unless we spent a little time talking about Jelly Bean. With releases coming out for seemingly everyone at this point, the devices with ports almost outnumber devices without. As the march continues, two new devices have managed to get some Jelly Bean—one of which becomes the second device to get Jelly Bean that wasn’t released as an Android device. They are the HP Touchpad and the HTC Wildfire S.

For the HP Touchpad, the unofficial CyanogenMod 10 port was developed by XDA Forum Member jcsullins, but posted on XDA by XDA Senior Member BIGSimon. For the Wildfire S, XDA Recognized Contributor benjamingwynn posted the unofficial CyanogenMod 10 build with credited help from about 10 other members. As should be expected, both ROMs do have their issues. The Wildfire S port is in its preview stage, meaning that it’s just for testing and shouldn’t be used unless you’re willing to help with testing and development. Of course, the HP Touchpad isn’t too much better, as the number of issues far exceeds the number of features working. The HP Touchpad does have the disadvantage of not having run Android from the outset, but that hasn’t stopped the HTC HD2 developers either.

Even so, it’s a beginning and both ROMs are currently under active development. So users just need to exercise a little patience, and both of these ROMs mat soon be stable enough to use. For more info, check out either the HP Touchpad thread or the Wildfire S thread.

[Thanks to XDA Senior Member rezo609 and XDA Recognized Themer zanderman112 for the tips!]

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