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Posts Tagged: CyanogenMod 9

CM9

Although there’s talk of CM10 around the web, developers aren’t quite done yet getting CyanogenMod 9 on as many phones as possible. With the first release candidate for CM9 released, developers have a great code base to bring an AOSP-derived experience to other devices. One such build is for the Samsung Galaxy S II HD LTE.

XDA Recognized Developer and Retired Senior Moderator dsixda is responsible for bringing CM9 to the highly underrated device. Despite not being the most popular version of the Galaxy S II, the port is very well done, with only a few minor issues. The list of current things working include:

- Wi-Fi
- Adobe Flash
- Play Store
- Vibration
- Hardware acceleration in browser
- Orientation sensor (model AK8975)
- Gyroscope (model K3G)
- Accelerometer (model K3DH)
- MTP
- Audio from speaker
- Video playback
- YouTube (including HD videos)
- USB mass storage
- Compass
- Rear camera (model M5MO) takes photos, and uses flash
- Bluetooth (and A2DP)
- GPS
- Phone
- 3G/HSPA/LTE Data
- SMS send/receive
- Headphone audio
- Torch app
- USB tethering
- Speakerphone
- Wi-Fi hotspot
- Lights on capacitive buttons
- Proximity sensor (model TAOS) for phone
- Ambient light sensor (model TAOS)
- Internal and external (micro) SD card access (Note: Internal SD is under /mnt/emmc, micro SD is ‘sdcard’)
- CPU frequency is being reported correctly as 1512MHz
- Backlight Notification (BLN)
- MHL (compiled into kernel but not tried yet)
- Overclocking

And the very short list of things not working:

- Front camera (model SiliconFile SR200PC20M) – Disabled for now; requires Samsung ICS update or ICS binaries from a phone that has the same sensor (I have yet to find one)

Although the feature list is impressive, this is still labeled as an alpha build. In other words, there may be unreported bugs in addition to the front facing camera. That said, the ROM can definitely be used as a daily driver for anyone who’s craving ICS on the Galaxy S II HD LTE. It should be noted that this will not work on any other device except for the Galaxy S II HD LTE, including any other version of the Galaxy S II. Of course, any developers who want to assist in squashing the remaining issues is more than welcome to do so.

For additional details, check out the original thread.

2833-pwned_2-1

Motorola has a long history of locking down their Android devices in order to prevent customization. From the eFUSE debacle surrounding the original Droid X to their general lack of interest in listening to the developer community, they have proven time and again their willingness to bite the hand that feeds them. Regardless of this, many users have a preference for the high level of hardware build quality provided by their Motorola overlords, and as such continue to purchase the locked down devices.

However, thanks to the efforts of XDA Recognized Developer kabaldan, locked down Motorola devices like the Milestone and the Defy can now enjoy fully functional hardware acceleration.

What is Hardware Acceleration?

Hardware acceleration for Android is (in the most basic of terms) the use of the GPU to aid in the drawing operations done by a given application or view. Aside from allowing the CPU and GPU to work simultaneously, this also allows the drawing operations to be done on much more specialized and efficient hardware for the task. This results in a better overall user experience.

The downside to this, which we covered previously, is the increased memory usage associated with hardware acceleration. Each individual process that is fully rendered by the GPU adds to overall memory footprint used by the system. This means that older devices with already limited capacity may suffer performance issues in certain tasks. With newer devices like the Galaxy SIII, this is less of a problem.

Thanks for the Info, but OEM’s Already Include this Awesome Feature. Don’t They?

The answer to that question is multifaceted. On one hand you have devices like the Galaxy Nexus, HTC One X, and Samsung Galaxy SIII that have tons of RAM, processing power, and the most up to date versions of the Android operating systems built into them from the factory. Older devices though, like the Motorola Milestone and Defy have been left out in the cold, to suffer without any future support from OEM’s. To make matters worse, Motorola in its infinite wisdom decided to sign the boot and recovery partition for the majority of their devices and prevent anyone from being able to replace them. This greatly crippled development of those devices, as custom ROM’s and recoveries are the cornerstone of development.

As time passed, a workaround was created that allowed custom ROMs like CM9 to be loaded onto locked devices, at the cost of hard bricking your device if done improperly. Full hardware acceleration though was one of the last issues that needed to be solved. Thanks to his clever workaround, kabaldan was able to come up with a method that should work for any locked down Motorola device.

Where’s the Link, Darn it? You Write Too Much!

Kabaldan is already hard at work including the newest drivers into his latest CM9 Milestone build here, while XDA Senior Member Epsylon3 already has it built into his CM9 build for the Motorola Defy here. So rejoice Motorola users, sticking it to the man has never made your device run so smooth.

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Droid X2

The development of an AOSP-based ROM such as CyanogenMod is sometimes troublesome on certain devices. The issues, bugs, and missing features sometimes range from broken 4G data or camera issues, down to things like problematic MMS. However, many bugs that have been plaguing CM9 progress for the Motorola Droid X2 have finally been fixed.

The ROM in question is CM9, and while ICS is not the newest OS on the block anymore, it’s still quite an achievement to get it running on older devices that haven’t yet received it. XDA Recognized Developer dragonzkiller has been actively working on the CM9 port, but has experienced a few issues making the camera work properly.

While seemingly a small problem, cameras can often be tricky to enable. It should also be noted that while still camera functionality is now fixed, video recording is not yet functional. With this problem being solved, though, all of the main features of the Droid X2 CM9 now work. This includes calls, texts, data, camera, WiFi, and Bluetooth. With only a few other issues remaining, it might not be long before Droid X2 owners get a fully functional CM9.

For additional details, head over to the original thread.

Dang You CyanogenMod

With I/O 2012 happening, this week has been a banner week for exciting news. On This Week in Development, Jordan talks about the articles on the XDA Portal that you may have missed but are very important. Some of the stories mentioned by Jordan are the release of CyanogenMod 9 RC1 for over 37 devices, the Galaxy S III Power Drain issue being identified and Android getting NTFS read and write support. Jordan reminds you to check out XDA Elite Recognized Developer AdamOutler‘s XDA TV Linux tutorial.

Jordan then spends some more time talking about the latest news from Google I/O 2012. Jordan mentions the Day One Recap and the forums being added for the Nexus 7 and Nexus Q. In Jelly Bean news, you can install the Play Store from Jelly Bean, and the operating system has been ripped for the Galaxy Nexus and ported to the HTC One X. What are you waiting for? Check this video out!

 

READ ON »

cm9

In what can be considered a quantum leap in Android development, CyanogenMod 9.0 RC1 is now available for 37 different devices. This massive release comes 225 days after Ice Cream Sandwich hit the AOSP repos. The team is quoted as saying;

“It wasn’t quick or easy, but we are extremely proud of this release and what it represents for us as a group.”

This release serves as the first wave of RC1s. CyanogenMod now has the core OS stabilized, and promises device maintainers will continue work on their device trees to bring more devices online. This will include some of the newer releases as well as some older generations. The currently supported list includes:

Advent Vega
ASUS EeePad Transformer
ASUS EeePad Transformer Prime
ASUS Transformer Pad
Droid Incredible S
Geeksphone ZERO
Google Galaxy Nexus (GSM)
Google Nexus S
Google Nexus S 4G
haida
HTC Incredible 2
HTC Sensation
LG Nitro HD / Optimus LTE
LG Optimus One
LG Optimus Sol
Motorola Cliq
Motorola CliqXT
Motorola Xoom (Wifi)
p1l
p1n
Samsung Epic 4G
Samsung Epic 4G
Samsung Galaxy Nexus (sprint)
Samsung Galaxy Nexus (vzw)
Samsung Galaxy Note (intl)
Samsung Galaxy S II (G)
Samsung Galaxy S2
Samsung Galaxy S2
Samsung Galaxy S2 ATT
Samsung Galaxy S2 ATT
Samsung Galaxy Tab
Samsung Galaxy Tab (CDMA)
Samsung Mesmerize
Samsung Vibrant
SE LiveWithWalkman-WT19i
SE Xperia Play CDMA-R800x
SE Xperia Play CDMA-R800x
SE Xperia Play -R800i
SE Xperia Play -R800i
SE XperiaActive-ST17i
SE XperiaArc-LT15i
SE XperiaMiniPro-SK17i
SE XperiaMini-ST15i
SE XperiaNeo-MT15i
SE XperiaPro-MK16i
SE XperiaRay-ST18i
smb_a1002
T-Mobile G2 / HTC Desire Z
T-Mobile LG myTouch
ZTE V9

Their issue tracker is now open for CM9 RC1, and they ask everyone reporting bugs to be sure to follow the instructions as to ensure your report is not marked invalid. Install instructions for CM9 remain the same as CM7, with more detailed instruction available on their wiki.

All device downloads can be found on their mirror manager, as they always have. To download the release candidate for your device, visit their Release Candidate page. Also, an RSS list is available at get.cm/rss.

CID

Compiling a ROM from source—or compiling anything from source—is often considered the first real development that aspiring developers do. There are ROM kitchens out there that will compile source for you, but the experience of doing it on your own is simply more gratifying. While the tutorial is written in the HTC Amaze 4G section of the forums, the instructions are pretty basic and should work for many other devices.

The tutorial, written by XDA Recognized Developer sportsstar89, was created to help generate interest in building ROMs from source and to help inspire more ideas. Of course, when it comes to AOSP development in general, the more the merrier.

Those intending on following the tutorial will need to have Linux installed on their computers to start. From there, users are given a step-by-step guide on gather source from the repositories and compiling it on their computers. There are some peculiarities that users need to pay attention to. For instance, there is a command where users need to input how many CPU cores their device has. So it is recommended that users read the instructions carefully so all the parameters are entered correctly.

For the full tutorial, check out the original thread.

czZs6

Back when we took a quick look at the Samsung Galaxy S III at Samsung Unpacked 2012, we immediately knew that the device’s proprietary software would surely be appreciated by the community. While we’ve seen various parts of the TouchWiz-laden UI ported to other devices, some lucky SGS3 owners actually prefer vanilla AOSP over Samsung’s heavily skinned variant.

For those who haven’t been following development progress on the device, XDA Elite Recognized Developer Chainfire first rooted the SGS3, sight-unseen, about a month ago. Not too long after, he released CF-Root and an unofficial version of ClockworkMod for the device.

Thanks to XDA Recognized Developer XpLoDWilD of Team Hacksung fame, we  now have official CyanogenMod 9 nightlies on Samsung’s latest flagship, enabling people to get a piece of the vanilla Android pie without intrusion from Samsung. The ROM itself is highly functional, though the following minor issues should be noted:

  • FM Radio: currently not supported, try Spirit FM from market
  • Using flash in camera causes problems.
  • LED is not being lit when charging.

Those looking to get their fix of CM9 goodness should head over to the release thread.

[Big thanks to XDA Forum Moderator babijoee for the tip!]

 

t-mobile-samsung-exhibit-2-4g

The Samsung Galaxy Exhibit II is a mid range Galaxy line phone on available on T-Mobile. Power users who own this new handset can finally get their toes wet in the ROM flashing pond with the first two available custom ROMs for the device. Both ROMs are brought to you by XDA Senior Member jocala.

The first ROM, Peach Sunrise, is a customized version of the stock Gingerbread build. Free versions of Titanium Backup, Voltage Control, CIFSManager & Quickboot are included. The Samsung WallpaperChooser application has been unlocked and wireless ADB access is possible. If an enhanced ROM based on the original TouchWiz-laden release feel sounds good to you, this may be the build you want. Necessary files and flashing instructions can be found in the ROM thread.

The second ROM is an unofficial build of CyanogenMod 9, and brings ICS to the device. While the build is definitely stable enough to run, camera bugs and Bluetooth issues may prevent many users from picking this up as a daily driver. Jocala promises no ETA on additional features, but mentions that the ROM is a work in progress. For instructions, necessary files, and progress updates on the ROM, be sure to check the ROM thread.

As always, be sure to backup your entire device before attempting to flash anything. For updates and discussions on the Exhibit II, jocala has put together a helpful resource thread, so head there now and check it out!

jordan6

In today’s Quick Take of This Week in Development, Jordan covers a couple stories of interest from the XDA Portal. In some more exciting Android and patent news, Jordan talks about the latest updates in the Google versus Oracle debate. Jordan mentions a couple neat developments on the XDA-Developers Forum, from the Official CyanogenMod 9 Nightlies for the Galaxy S II I9100G and the unofficial CyanogenMod Alpha for the HTC ChaCha.

Jordan then goes on to talk about the release of the kernel source for the Samsung Galaxy S III. Jordan mentions our new Pro Tip video on XDA TV. In a final request Jordan asks you to vote on our next Pro Tip Video topic.

READ ON »

Codeworks

The good news just keeps coming for the I9100G variant of the Samsung Galaxy S II. The OMAP4-based device just received an official dose of TouchWiz-laden Ice Cream Sandwich goodness a few short days ago in the form of the Android 4.0.3-based XXLPQ update. However, no matter how much you may tolerate or perhaps even enjoy a particular OEM skin, there are many out there who have one quest with new Android devices—loading an AOSP-derived ROM.

This is now possible on the I9100G, and it comes in the form of official CyanogenMod 9 nightlies for the device. The developer responsible for this achievement is none other than XDA Elite Recognized Developer codeworkx of Team Hacksung. As of now, the ROM appears to be highly functional, with only the following known issues:

The builds are already pretty stable and there shouldn’t be much problems while using it as daily driver.
All features except FM-Radio, Wifi-Direct and maybe TV-Out are working.
I’ve also added a touchkey backlight notification feature (Notification LED) and some other funny gadgets.

Aside from being highly functional, installation is also a breeze as long as you are running the ICS bootloader. If you’re not, or are unsure as to your bootloader version, the easiest way to make sure that you’re on the correct bootloader is to simply flash the aforementioned official ICS XXLPQ firmware release for the I9100G.

First time installing CyanogenMod 9 to your Galaxy S II, or coming from another ROM:
- READ FAQs: http://teamhacksung.org/wiki/index.p…sked_Questions
- Make sure you’re running ICS bootloaders! (if you’re unsure, flash a official ICS rom and proceed)
- Make sure you’re running a proper working ClockworkMod-Recovery
- Copy GApps and CM9 ZIPs to your internal SDCard
- Boot into Recovery
- Flash CM9 zip from internal SDCard
- Flash GApps zip from internal SDCard
- DO A DATA WIPE / FACTORY RESET (otherwise your device will be stuck at boot)
- Reboot
- Don’t restore Apps using Titanium Backup!Upgrading from earlier version of CyanogenMod 9:
- Copy CM9 ZIP to your internal SDCard
- Boot into Recovery
- Flash CM9 zip from internal SDCard
- Reboot

I9100G owners out there, we suggest grabbing a drink, heading over to the thread, reading up on the procedure, and flashing immediately. Those wishing to get a piece of the pie should head over to the ROM thread and visiting his development blog.

[Big thanks to Jiangyi for the tip!]

HTC ChaCha

Who could have possibly anticipated this? While many, more popular devices still don’t have an AOSP-based ROM, development seems to be moving right along for the HTC ChaCha. The device, which wasn’t scheduled to get ICS in any form, has received an update to Google’s latest and greatest courtesy of an unofficial CyanogenMod 9 port.

XDA Recognized Contributor Alex C. has posted a thread on behalf of XDA Recognized Developer adlx.xda for the alpha releases of the build that are, admittedly, pretty rough. However, a booting AOSP ICS build is better than no AOSP ICS build at all. Given the Alpha nature, the problems are quite plentiful:

1. Camera is not working (front/back)
2. Volume panel switching causes a crash in Trebuchet
3. Locker options do not fit in properly – minor cosmetic issue
4. Key X is not working
5. Wi-Fi Scan button does nothing
6. Performance issues. Phone seems sluggish
7. Movie Studio is not working
8. GPS might not work -> POSTPONED: Issue appears as fixed. Tested with Sygic, fix in 10 seconds.
9. Gallery crashes when started
10. Network drops when proximity sensors are activated
11. Wifi cannot lock on hidden hotspots
12. Physical keyboard and soft menu keys backlight doesn’t work unless you have specific brightness settings
13. Android terminal emulator cannot open /dev/tty (permissions)
14. Sometimes mobile data seems to get off

While many of these issues would discourage many potential flashers, several of the issues have work-arounds. As you may have guessed, though, there’s a lot of work to be done.

For additional information, hit up the original thread.

CM9

It was bound to happen sooner or later. With the Asus release of the unlocker tool for the TF300T, everyone could probably guess that development on the modest, yet still awesome tablet would start picking up, as developers now have no obstacles blocking their path. And now thanks to the official release of experimental CyanogenMod 9 builds, Asus Transformer TF300T owners now have access to the popular AOSP-derived, multi-device aftermarket firmware.

XDA Recognized Developer XpLoDWilD of Team Hacksung has released an experimental build of the popular ROM for users to try out. And frankly, for a ROM labeled as experimental, it’s surprisingly functional and doesn’t have a lot broken.

Currently, at least as of experimental build number 2, the worst users can expect is that MTP is broken. This means you cannot place files from the device onto the computer, although the developer will note that users can apparently still transfer files from their PC to the device. This is, of course, a big improvement over the first build, which had camera and WiFi issues. However, these issues were fixed in build 2, so they are a thing of the past. With no indication that anything else is broken, users who can live without MTP might as well call it a daily driver, as it appears to be pretty stable for such an early release.

To get started, head over to the original thread.

[Big thanks to XDA Senior Member AndroidIndian for the tip!]

BBQlog

Change logs are definitely one of the most important parts of any release. Be it an app, ROM, kernel, mod, tweak, script, you name it; releasing a change log with each new release allows users to see what you’ve changed, fixed, added, and subtracted from prior versions. Often, it’s the very first developer-to-user interaction, and a well thought out change log can ease the minds of the cautious and give users compelling reason to upgrade. Fans of CyanogenMod nightlies probably know the value of the change logs even more so than most other ORDers, as they receive substantial updates rather frequently.

Enter BBQlog. Released by XDA Senior Member peterperfect along with the team behind the previously covered OpenDESIGN project, BBQlog is a third-party website that gives you the change log for CyanogenMod Nightlies. While many users are asking what is the big deal, as that information is typically already made readily available, the catch is where they pull the updates from. Instead of using CyanogenMod Gerrit, which is the more popular way to show the change log, BBQlog pulls its change log stats straight from the GIT. This means it shows every single little change, unedited. It’s much like buying the “Not Rated” version of a movie. You get the movie, plus all the stuff they didn’t show you in theaters. Additionally, the BBQlog team is currently working on an Android app that’ll push all this information directly to your Android phone.

While it isn’t an official CyanogenMod project, it’s still quite useful nonetheless for users and developers alike. For the link to the website, the full list of credits, and more, visit the original thread.

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