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Posts Tagged: Google Chromecast

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The world of  users is divided up into the Haves and the Have-Nots. By this, I am of course referring to whether or not a particular user was lucky enough to attain root access before the device updated itself to the root-blocking build 12840 OTA.

Earlier today, the Chromecast started receiving an OTA update to build 16664. No, this version does not bring back root access by way of a vulnerable bootloader. Rather, it offers bug fixes, stability improvements, saved volume preferences, improved IPv6 support, and improved DNS robustness. Now when dealing with a device in such a precarious situation where root is no longer attainable, you’d generally be faced with a choice: stay rooted and possibly be one step behind when it comes to updates, or go back to the official firmware and say goodbye to root. But thanks to the folks at Team-Eureka, this is a no brainer for rooted users.

Earlier today, Team-Eureka released an update to their Eureka-ROM and rooted stock ROM, both rebased on the latest 16664 OTA. And as we mentioned before, Eureka-ROM adds quite a bit of functionality to your Chromecast such as root shell access, alternate DNS servers, custom whitelists, and a web-based control panel. But if root access is all that tickles your fancy, they offer that as well.

If you’ve got a rooted Chromecast and want to get in on the latest 16664 fun without giving up root, head over to the Eureka-ROM or rooted stock ROM threads.

Jordan0217

HTC America participated in a Reddit AMA and spoke about their future plans! That and much more news is covered by Jordan, as he reviews all the important stories from this week. Included in this week’s news is the announcement that the Huawei Ascend P6 is getting an Android KitKat beta and their is now a way to stream your local content on your Chromecast with LocalCast!

Jordan talks about how Google acquired a sound-based login company. Be sure to check out XDA Developer TV videos from last week including XDA Developer TV Producer TK’s Xposed Tuesday video for Complete Action Plus, Jordan’s introduction to ART, and XDA TK’s Android App Review of Quickr. Pull up a chair and check out this video.

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Chromecast is a blast, no doubt about it. A small USB stick-like device that can do magic with your TV is something that might interest even skeptics. Streaming YouTube videos or some other multimedia was never so easy. Not so long ago, we talked about Google making the Chromecast SDK available to developers. As you will read in a moment, Android-Chromecast is capable of doing some really amazing things.

XDA Senior Member dakdroid, who also created the rather interesting music player beat, created another useful app. This time, your phone or tablet will easily stream media directly from your device to your TV. The list of supported formats is quite long, including H.264, MP4, and WebM. Using this application is extremely easy, as all you need to do is connect via the LocalCast app, select a video, and relax watching some of your favorite local media.

If you are a happy user of one of the smallest Google devices and have a phone or tablet with Android greater than 2.3, you should definitely visit the application thread and give LocalCast a shot.

Jordan0207

Android 4.4 KitKat for the Verizon HTC One has been released! That and much more news is covered by Jordan, as he reviews all the important stories from this week. Included in this week’s news is the announcement that the Samsung Galaxy S2 is getting official CyanogenMod 11 nightlies and the Chromecast SDK is now available for your Hacking pleasure! That’s not all that’s covered in today’s video!

Jordan talks about the other videos released this week on XDA Developer TV. XDA Developer TV Producer TK released an Xposed Tuesday video for MinMinGuard, AdamOutler showed us how to create a internet controlled powerstrip, and TK gave us an Android App Review of Android Hub. Pull up a chair and check out this video.

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The $35 Google Chromecast has had a bit of a chequered history in its relatively short six-month lifespan. While the device offered streaming video and audio capabilities previously seen only in far more costly accessories, the list of officially supported services has always been quite sparse. At first this looked like it would be only a minor inconvenience, as the device was promptly rooted and given some nice aftermarket developer love. But that root exploit was promptly closed off in a forced OTA update, leaving unrooted Chromecast owners SOL.

During the Chromecast’s tenure occupying our valued HDMI slots, we’ve seen a few solutions appear that enabled local media playback. However, the underlying method these tools used was unfortunately closed off. Then some time ago, a handful of additional apps were released with support for the Chromecast. And not too long after that, Google got off of its lazy rear and added support for Play Music and Play Movies from the Web. We even caught a few hints that official first-party Android mirroring would be coming to Google’s little media streamer. But for many, all of these advancements are unfortunately not enough.

Now, Google has taken the first true steps in making the Chromecast a bit more open, thanks to the public release of the Google Cast SDK. The SDK allows you to create a “sender application” for Android, iOS, or Chrome, as well as a “receiver application” that can be implemented in the style of your choosing.

Developers looking to get started with Chromecast app development should head over to the Google Cast SDK release page to learn the basics. From there, head over to the Developer Guide, register your device appropriately, and start coding. A list of supported APIs can be found here.

So, what about end users? Well, now it’s simply a waiting game for more powerful Chromecast apps to appear. We’re glad to see development for the Chromecast open up a bit, and we’re excited to see what the future holds for this little media streamer. What are your thoughts on the Chromecast? Share in the comments below, and don’t forget to make your way over to the Google Chromecast forum!

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Not too long ago, we talked about KyoCast by XDA Forum Member Kyonz. For those who may not remember, KyoCast allowed users to bypass Google’s predefined whitelist of supported services.  It worked by redirecting any requests for whitelist information over to KyoCast servers, where various third party services and applications are allowed.

Now as Kyocast support is drawing to a close, a fantastic replacement has emerged in the form of Eureka-ROM for the . The work comes from the aptly titled Team-Eureka (consisting of XDA Forum Members Kyonz and tchebb, and Recognized Contributorddggttf3), and it is based on the 14975 stock build, but with additional features. This builds from their previous release entitled PwnedCast, but with additional goodies.

So far, the ROM features quite a healthy features list, including disabled OTAs, modified DNS servers, root access, custom OTA engine, and of course, custom whitelisting. There’s even a web-based control panel, where you can get device info, enable or disable the OTA system, select your whitelist provider, enable or disable content services, use custom DNS servers, and more.

In order to get going, you need to first install the previously covered FlashCast. From there, you simply include the latest 1.1 version of Eureka-ROM on your FlashCast USB drive and proceed like normal. After about 9 minutes, you can genuinely proclaim, “Eureka!”

Make your way over to the original thread to get started.

Jordan1213

Android 4.4.2 KitKat is now available for the current Google Nexus devices and its source code has been released. That and much more news is covered by Jordan, as he reviews all the important stories from this week. Included in this week’s news is the announcement that the LG G Pad 8.3 and Sony Z Ultra now have Google Play Edition Devices and the Ubuntu Touch project has announced future devices. That’s not all that covered in today’s video!

Jordan talks about the other videos released this week on XDA Developer TV. XDA Developer TV Producer TK released an Xposed Tuesday video for Android Tuner, Jordan showed us what the new Android 4.4.1/ Android 4.4.2 KitKat updates include, and TK gave us an Android App Review of List My Apps. Pull up a chair and check out this video.

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movies cast

The Google Chromecast team has been rather busy in the past few days. Just yesterday, we wrote about how the Chromecast had received an OTA update to build 14651, bringing support for the new Chromecast V2 API, as well as a revised home screen and the groundwork for the forthcoming Android-to-Chromecast display mirroring. And just one day earlier, we covered how support was added for ten new apps, including a couple that deliver local content to Google’s frugal media streamer.

Now, the Chromecast supports Google Play Music and Google Play Movies.

Wait, what? Yes, you read that correctly. While you’ve always been able to cast content from the official Android apps for Google Play Music and Movies, there was never support for casting from the webapps until today’s update. This addition now brings Google Play Music and Movies in line with the functionality we’ve already seen in Google’s own YouTube webapp, as well as the third-party Netflix app at the device’s launch.

Personally, I can’t even begin to understand why this wasn’t implemented at device launch. In fact, when I first heard the news, I had to double check to make sure I hadn’t misread something. But, I guess it’s better late than never. And for those living in the Google Play ecosystem, this is definitely a good move.

What are your thoughts on the update? Please share your thoughts in the comments below, and don’t forget to visit our Google Chromecast forum.

[Source: Google Play Google+ | Via TheVerge]

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Just yesterday, we talked about how the Google Chromecast just got a whole lot more useful thanks to ten new supported applications. Well as it turns out, that’s not all that’s going on in the Chromecast world. An update has actually been in the process of rolling out ever since last Tuesday, and it is now finally starting to make its way to most devices.

The new build comes in at version 14651 (replacing 13300), and it brings many new features. While the update bills itself as a bugfix release that also brings a new home screen, it seems to pack quite a bit more. XDA Senior Member ddggttff3 detailed some of the changes in this post:

Trust me, its more then a bug update :P So far the biggest notable changes:

  • Support for new Chromecast V2 API
  • New Homescreen/Images
  • Initial support for some sort of “screen sharing” protocol

And lots of other little things here and there.

The new API, as well as the initial screen sharing support make it quite an interesting update. Though it is curious that many of these updates have not been officially disclosed.

Those who just want to look at the pretty pictures can do so by visiting this link, which was discovered by XDA Forum Member celebi23 in this thread. That link cycles through all of the pictures in a nice, pleasing slide show.

Has your Chromecast received the 14651 update? If so, how do you like it? The prospect of a new update, as well as the ten new supported apps, may just make me take mine out of the cabinet and connect it to my AV system again. Let us know your thoughts in the comments below.

[Source: Google Chrome Blogspot]

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The Google Chromecast is a great little media streaming device—and one that doesn’t break the bank while accomplishing the basics and doing them relatively well. But ever since the device’s launch, the list of supported apps has been quite depressing. Despite this, Google recently made changes to the Google Play Store to better highlight Chromecast-enabled applications, indirectly signaling that more apps would be added soon.

Now that day is here, as there are ten new supported apps that have been added to the Chromecast’s streaming arsenal. While the rumored Android-to-Chromecast display mirroring has not yet arrived, there are plenty of new additions to help keep you glued to the old boob tube.

The new supported apps can be found by visiting chromecast.com/apps. Today’s launch brought Vevo, Red Bull.TV, Songza, Plex, PostTV, Viki, Avia, and RealPlayer Cloud support. Particularly noteworthy are that three of these new apps (Plex, Avia, and RealPlayer Cloud)  support playing your own personal content. This is on top of the previously supported apps: Netflix, HBO Go, Hulu Plus, Pandora, YouTube, Google Play Movies, and Google Music.

Are you excited for these newly acquired Chromecast content consumption abilities or are you holding out for Android-to-Chromecast display mirroring? Let us know your thoughts in the comments below!

[Source: Google Chrome Blog]

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I’ve said it before, and I’ll say it again. Despite its limitations, the Google Chromecast is a great little device for its paltry $35 asking price. However, it’s certainly not perfect, and one of the main limitations is in the limited number of content providers.

Those lucky enough to have rooted their device before the first OTA blocked the root method have some fun options to play around with such as a custom ROM and the like. But those who received the automatic OTA before getting a chance to root are unfortunately out of luck.

Now, it appears as if new first party functionality is coming soon to the device. This comes in the form of two new APIs new to Android 4.4.1: CAPTURE_SECURE_VIDEO_OUTPUT and CAPTURE_VIDEO_OUTPUT. These APIs will only be available to Google and OEMs, presumably for copyright-related reasons. And if that’s the case and proprietary DRM is used, this means that the previously covered Cheapcast and other Chromecast emulators will probably not work.

Regardless of the issues, this is very good news for Chromecast owners. Since the cheapest Miracast receivers are approximately twice as expensive as the Chromecast, this could be quite useful for budget-conscious users looking to mirror their Android devices onto the big screen.

This, along with rumors of a Nexus TV, has us excited to see what Google has in store for the living room in the months to come! What are your thoughts? Do you own a Chromecast? Do you actually use it, or is it just needlessly sagging the HDMI ports on your TV, preamp-processor, or A/V Receiver? Let us know in the comments below!

[Source: Koushik Dutta's Google+ | Via Engadget]

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Android is one of the most amazing mobile OSes ever released. The ability to mod and customize the OS so easily gives almost unlimited possibilities. The highly modified and stripped version seem on the Google Chromecast also has some potential. Not too long ago, we presented a custom ROM and recovery for Samsung Galaxy Gear smartwatch. Today we want to show another amusing development: a custom ROM for the Google Chromecast.

For those who don’t know what Chromecast is, it is an HDMI media streaming stock. And now, thanks to XDA Senior Member ddggttff3, there is a custom ROM based on the 13300 stock image. It is rooted and even has its own OTA system. Furthermore, it has a dedicated recovery and a custom kernel to enhance the user experience.

If you own a Chromecast and were lucky enough to root before the root-blocking first OTA, head over to the development thread and give PwnedCast ROM a shot.

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As good of a value as the $35  is, the device has so much potential that is trapped behind Google’s walled garden. The whitelist, which only allows certain services to work with the device, may be meant to ensure that everything works seamlessly. But for power users, this is only a roadblock to true device freedom.

So far, the device has gotten off to a rocky start in terms of modification. We quickly saw the device rooted, only to see the “exploit” patched in the following update. Ever since, the Chromecast world was divided into the haves and have-nots: those who were able to root before the automatic and unstoppable (once connected to the Internet ) update, and those who weren’t so lucky.

Up until now, however, there was little practical benefit to most end users to be rooted. Sure, it was cool due to its inherent novelty, but there wasn’t much added value to be had once root was achieved. Now, there’s a very practical reason to want to be in the former: KyoCast by XDA Forum Member Kyonz.

KyoCast allows you to get around Google’s whitelist easily. It comes in the form of a modified image that can be flashed to the device via the previously covered Flashcast. It works by redirecting traffic requests for whitelist information to KyoCast servers. Here, various third party services and applications are allowed.

So what services can you connect to so far? AOL, HBO, Post, Rev3, and Songza. Note, however, that this is just the list of added services. In other words, clients are not available yet, but they are bound to come soon. And of course, developers can contact Kyonz to get their services added to the modified whitelist. Finally, Kyonz provides a restore image to move back to the original hosts file, and thus the original whitelist.

Make your way over to the original thread to get started.

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