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Posts Tagged: Google I/O 2012

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Google I/O 2012 brought with it a variety of exciting announcements in both software and hardware. Many Android enthusiasts have been drooling over the 7 inch, Tegra 3 powered Nexus tablet since it’s unveiling at the kenote of the event. As you are no doubt aware, the tablet is already available for pre-order through the Play Store, where it is listed as  ‘Ships Soon (2-3 weeks)’.

Power users awaiting their pre-orders won’t have to wait for a root method, though. In no time at all, the root method was documented and shared to the community—weeks before release! The process requires the use of ADB and fastboot via command line, and works on any OS as long as the Android SDK is installed.

Thanks to the unlockable bootloader on the Nexus 7, the root procedure is as simple as one would expect. XDA Forum Member FadedLite has gathered the instructions in his root tutorial thread for the lucky people already using the device or those who simply want to be prepared for their upcoming tablets. As is expected when unlocking via fastboot oem unlock, your user data will be cleared. Be sure to save all of your important data beforehand.

The Nexus 7 will arrive very soon. If development for the device continues at this speed, the tablet will undoubtedly become a community favorite!

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With I/O 2012 having come and gone, a lot of exciting news has appeared on the XDA Portal. If you missed it, there is no need to fear. This Week in Development, Jordan talks about the articles on the XDA Portal that you may have missed. Some of the stories mentioned are the log cat article and Google Ears being available for any Ice Cream Sandwich ROM. Jordan reminds you to check out XDA Elite Recognized Developer AdamOutler‘s XDA TV Google I/O 2012 Developer Review.

Jordan then spends some more time talking about the latest news from the developments from Google I/O 2012. Jordan mentions the Day two and three Recap. In Jelly Bean news, the OS has been ported to the CDMA Galaxy Nexus and the Acer Iconia A500. What are you waiting for? Check this video out!

READ ON »

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Dang You Google

Another year of the defining event for all things Google and, most importantly, Android developers has now passed, and many exciting announcements have been made. Our Portal Administrator Will Verduzco was live watching the events unfold. XDA-Developers has added forums for the Nexus 7 tablet and the Nexus Q device, both announced at Google I/O 2012. There has been a flurry of activity regrading the latest version on Android, Jelly Bean, since its announcement this week.

While all these announcements are exciting to both developers and users, Google I/O 2012 had a bunch of information for Android developers that may not excite phone users, but it excites us here at XDA-Developers. In that spirit XDA Elite Recognized Developer AdamOutler has picked out what he defines as the must watch videos for Android developers. So check out this video .

READ ON »

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Two days ago, we wrote about what we felt to be some of the most exciting news from day 1 of Google I/O 2012. Now, we’re back to take a quick look at day 2′s keynote and some of the more interesting sessions on days 2 and 3. While the keynote on day 1 was focused predominantly on Android 4.1 Jelly Bean and the various digital media resources available through the Play store, the second keynote was all about Chrome and how cloud-based technologies such as computation and immersive experiences shape our lives.

We also had the chance to attend sessions covering the next version of the ADK, Project Butter and how it smooths the Android experience, and new NFC features available in Jelly Bean. So what are you waiting for? Read on for more!

READ ON »

Dang You CyanogenMod

With I/O 2012 happening, this week has been a banner week for exciting news. On This Week in Development, Jordan talks about the articles on the XDA Portal that you may have missed but are very important. Some of the stories mentioned by Jordan are the release of CyanogenMod 9 RC1 for over 37 devices, the Galaxy S III Power Drain issue being identified and Android getting NTFS read and write support. Jordan reminds you to check out XDA Elite Recognized Developer AdamOutler‘s XDA TV Linux tutorial.

Jordan then spends some more time talking about the latest news from Google I/O 2012. Jordan mentions the Day One Recap and the forums being added for the Nexus 7 and Nexus Q. In Jelly Bean news, you can install the Play Store from Jelly Bean, and the operating system has been ripped for the Galaxy Nexus and ported to the HTC One X. What are you waiting for? Check this video out!

 

READ ON »

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Earlier today, we had the great pleasure of attending the Google I/O 2012 Keynote Presentation at the Moscone West conference center in downtown San Francisco. While Internet connectivity issues precluded us from live blogging the event, we would like to bring you some of the most exciting events that we saw, as well our thoughts on the future of the Android ecosystem. READ ON »

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Less than a month ago, registrations opened for Google I/O 2012. It was sold out in 20 minutes. This didn’t go down exactly as planned. According to Google themselves, server load immediately exceeded the number of tickets they had available. Registration was hit-or-miss, and certainly not first-come-first-serve basis, as promised. Google had also hinted that a coding challenge would be part of the registration process, so more developers and fewer swag-hunters would get in. But for reasons unknown, this didn’t actually happen. More than a few of those who managed to obtain actual tickets tried to sell them on eBay for obscene markups, while many disappointed would-be Google Goers took to social networks to cry their dismay.

But all was not yet lost! Google held back 100 tickets that could be won in a competition, as they did last year. The key difference? Last year you won the ticket, whereas this year you won the opportunity to buy the ticket—at twice the price of last year’s ticket. This year’s contest was also announced only a day before it took place, and the timing was awkward for many. Those who could actually free up the time from their jobs on such short notice, and were not deeply asleep at the time of the challenge, now had a real chance of being allowed to purchase a ticket.

At 7:00 AM at Google HQ, a virtual shot was fired, and the challenge began. So far so good. Some time into the competition, comments were heard from frustrated developers who simply could not figure out what they were doing wrong. They felt the assignment conditions were being satisfied, and couldn’t find where they made mistakes. Why was Google Code Jam claiming their answers were incorrect, while other developers’ answers were being accepted ?

This didn’t last very long, as one developer finally figured it out: Google was only accepting incorrect answers! It seems that Google was not taking an edge case into account in their own answer to problem A. It meant that every answer for problem A that had already been accepted either was wrong or didn’t contain the edge case, while many correct answers were being marked as incorrect and penalized.  As this is the first of two problems, it also meant that those stuck with this problem didn’t progress quickly to problem B. Time is a deciding factor in these challenges, so all results and rankings were essentially invalidated.

As one might expect from any crowd consisting primarily of individuals of the basement-dwelling variety (myself included), outrage ensued. It will come as no surprise to anybody that Google took their sweet time coming up with any response at all, but finally word arrived:

“We’ve made a mistake in problem A. The correct output is 0, but it is being judged as wrong because 4 of our problem writers have independently made the same bug in their solutions. We would like to apologize for the confusion this has caused. We will send an email to all participants shortly, announcing our plan to resolve this issue in the least unfair manner possible. We take a lot of precautions to prevent mistakes like this, but we have messed up this time.”

Of course, everybody makes mistakes—it is only human. But when your company is known for only wanting to hire the best of the best, and is rumored to hire only 0.5% of all applicants, having all four of the engineers who created this challenge make the same trivial mistake in a fairly basic assignment raises some serious questions—namely why didn’t they hire any of the developers who actually got the answer right? ;)

But wait. You didn’t think it actually stopped there, did you? Not only was Google’s own answer to the challenge wrong, but several developers taking part in the challenge came forward claiming the actual assignments had already been online for roughly an hour the day before the challenge. They were (at that time) thought to be practice assignments, but those who happened to check-in at that time potentially already had the answers before the competition even began.

As has been debated in the Google Plus thread there doesn’t seem to be a fair solution possible other than giving all the participants the chance to purchase a ticket. And guess what? Google just announced all participants will be offered the chance to buy a ticket. It seems this rather hilarious situation has a happy ending after all!

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Google I/O registration opened a few days ago, and as you might have heard, was sold out in minutes. Many developers were unable to get a ticket, and this has been widely blamed on resellers (see tickets on eBay) as well as people hunting for the much coveted I/O swag.

The past few years, Google have given away pretty spectacular items at I/O, and many expect this year’s item to be the rumored Nexus Tablet. This alone would be reason enough for many a fanboy to try and swoop up some tickets to be the first to have one, or for the aspiring entrepreneur to resell the tablet afterwards for more than the ticket cost.

Due to all the complaints about the situation, Google has decided to have a second week of I/O, from July 11 through July 13, at the Moscone Center in San Francisco. The week immediately following the already scheduled I/O was not possible due to 4th of July festivities.

The second week of Google I/O will feature the same keynotes, technical sessions, code labs, hackathon, developer sandbox, developer hangouts, and after hours activities as the original Google I/O.

Registrations open May 1. Be sure to get a ticket this time around, lest Google be forced to hold a third week of I/O!

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