• 5,595,623
    REGISTERED
  • 46,476
    ONLINE NOW

Posts Tagged: Google Nexus 4

flying_android_with_rocket_by_lowaccess-d3kf384

Google has announced on the official Android Google+ that starting today, the Nexus 7 (both 2012 and 2013) and Nexus 10 will receive an over-the-air update to Android 4.4 KitKat. According to Google, the Nexus 4 and versions of the Nexus 7 with mobile data will be getting the update soon as well.

KitKat was released nearly two weeks ago, and it brought many improvements in security and user-facing features. Google promised that older Nexus devices, unfortunately not including the Galaxy Nexus, would receive an update to Android 4.4 within few weeks. Today’s announcement now reaffirms this. It didn’t take long for developers here on XDA to bake some unofficial ports for these devices. But unfortunately, not everything was perfect in these early builds. Now, however, the unofficial builds will also benefit, as Google will also release the proprietary binaries required to build a fully working system.

We all hoped that it wouldn’t take long for Google to push out the OTA updates for all supported devices. And soon, current Nexus owners will be able to enjoy official KitKat. In the meantime, head over to your device-specific forum and keep an eye out for system dumps and OTAs available to flash.

Capture

A little under a year ago, we talked about a rather unique multiboot solution available for the Google Nexus 7 (2012). The tool, which was developed by XDA Recognized Developer Tasssadar, differed from most other multiboot solutions available on other devices because it streamlined the process and requires no modification of your device’s bootloader or existing /system partition. It did, however, require modification to the /data partition, but things were still more civilized than most other multiboot solutions due to the integrated installer app.

Now, Tasssadar’s MultiROM solution has been extended to also support the Nexus 4 and Nexus 7 (2013). Just as before, the main staple of MultiROM is its ability to allow you to boot into any number of Android ROMs. In addition to adding support for the two new devices, however, MultiROM has undergone a whole host of improvements over the last year.

For starters, MultiROM now allows you to restore from an existing Nandroid backup for use as a secondary ROM. This is an extremely practical feature because it allows you to make a backup of your existing ROM and transfer it to the secondary installation so that you can objectively compare results when flashing modifications.

Tasssadar has also removed one of the key limitations from last year’s release. Before, all ROMs had to be installed on internal memory. This presented somewhat of a challenge to many since modern Nexus devices lack external SD card expansion slots. Now, MultiROM allows you to use a USB-OTG cable and connected USB storage to house the ROMs off of device storage.

To get started, visit the appropriate thread below:

[Thanks to Tasssadar and Nikwen for the heads up!]

Advertisment
Capture

Ever since Google released the source code for Android 4.4 KitKat, we knew it wouldn’t be long before proper, source-built ROMs were made available for certain devices. And naturally, we all expected these initial builds to appear first on some of the current Nexus fleet. That is indeed the case, as there are now builds for the , Google Nexus 7 (2012), and the Google Nexus 7 (2013).

These builds all come courtesy of the Paranoid Android team, and are labeled “4.4r1 by AOSPA.” The Nexus 4 build comes courtesy of XDA Recognized Developer franciscofranco, the Nexus 7 (2012) build comes courtesy of XDA Senior Member EvanA, and the Nexus 7 (2013) comes courtesy of XDA Recognized Developer aaronpoweruser.

At this point, it is unclear what exactly works and what doesn’t work. However, we do know that Paranoid Android’s signature features have not yet been merged. Rather, this is just based on the source code that was released yesterday. And since this is such an early build and source was only released a day ago, we wouldn’t use these as daily drivers just yet. That said, it’s great to see such early source-built progress being made. Kudos to the Paranoid Android team. We can’t wait to see the ROM’s key features merged!

To get started, head over to the appropriate link below!

[Many thanks to EvanA and aaronpoweruser for the Flo link!]

Capture

What an exciting day we had yesterday. As was widely speculated, the Google Nexus 5 was finally released, which means that you can finally put that F5 key to rest. However, the new device wasn’t the only important announcement yesterday. We were also given a nice dose of the next version of Android, version 4.4 KitKat. Now the question in everybody‘s mind undoubtedly turns to when their device will get the update. Luckily, we now know the roadmap for certain key devices. READ ON »

Capture

Back at XDA:DevCon 2013, Ubuntu community manager Jono Bacon gave a talk about the future of Ubuntu on mobile devices. Also at the conference, Ubuntu coder Michael Hall held a Ubuntu Touch Development Workshop aimed at spurring and fostering application development for the soon-to-be-ready platform. Both of these presentations can now be viewed online. Fast forward a few months, and Ubuntu for phones is now available for its first two devices.

Coinciding with the desktop Ubuntu 13.10 release, Ubuntu for phones is now officially available for installation on the Google Nexus 4 and Samsung Galaxy Nexus. The release bills itself as being feature complete, with quite a few bells and whistles available including gesture control for multitasking and regularly used apps, click packages, cloud photo storage, easy access to search from anywhere, extensive personalization possibilities, and a set of APIs with which to build new applications. And because all of the included core applications run natively rather than through an interpreter, Ubuntu promises high levels of performance.

While today’s release is a very big step forward, not everything is fully baked just yet. Only two devices are currently supported. And even for those devices, the experience isn’t quite perfect. For starters airplane mode and a lock screen have not yet been added. And remember the promise of convergent computing where a smartphone can function as a complete PC, as long as it meets the minimum requirements? Well, that’s not yet available. Despite the limitations, today’s release is quite exciting. It’s always nice to see other software options available for the devices that some of us already own.

Head over to the Ubuntu for Phones splash page and follow the relatively simple instructions. More information about the specific capabilities and limitations in today’s release can be found here. Finally, those looking into community-based progress on Ubuntu for Phones for other devices should head over to the Ubuntu Touch Wiki.

[Thanks to User Experience Admin svetius for the tip!]

banner

Did you join the Internet masses in picking up a Nexus 4 now that its price has dropped to a mere $199 and $249 for the 8 and 16 gig models, respectively? If so, I can’t blame you. In fact, I’ll just come out and say it: The Google Nexus 4 is an utterly fantastic smartphone. However, that’s not to say that it’s perfect.

In my opinion, the Nexus 4 most accurately represents the phrase, “the whole is greater than the sum of its parts.” After all, it has an underwhelming camera, the processor is beginning to show its age (at least in comparison with the latest generation of flagships), and most of all, its screen lacks the vibrance and saturation of better panels. Luckily this last point can be alleviated thanks to XDA Recognized Developer franciscofranco.

Franciscofranco’s Nexus 4 Display Control app does exactly what its name states. It allows you to tune both the color and gamma, as well as backup and restore color profiles. While this won’t fix the bad viewing angles or magically give the Nexus 4 a 1080p display, the app will certainly help you make the most of the hardware. One thing to keep in mind is that as of Android 4.2.2, module injection was disabled by Google so you must be running franco.Kernel in order to use the gamma interface.

Normally, the application sells for $1.99 on Google Play. However, franciscofranko has so generously provided the application free of charge to XDA community members. Head over to the application thread to get started.

marquee_jb_4_3_flo

Not too long ago, we brought you news of the Nexus 7 (2013) Factory Image situation and the drama that ensued. Luckily, it wasn’t too long before the world was made right once again, and the factory images and driver binaries for the device were released. For those keeping track, this was build JSS15J for the 2013 Nexus 7 and JWR66V for the rest of the current Nexus stable. Now, a new build has emerged, and it is build JSS15Q for the 2013 Nexus 7 and JWR66Y for the others.

So what does this update bring? This is essentially a minor revision for the Nexus 4, 2012 Nexus 7, Nexus 10, and the GSM Galaxy Nexus. Aside from a security fix and some camera, NFC, and auto-brightness tweaks, not much has been changed. However, if you’re currently using the 2013 Nexus 7, you’re in for a treat. In addition to the above changes, the latest update supposedly fixes the GPS and multi-touch issues experienced by certain users. Also of note is that driver binaries are now available for the Verizon Galaxy Nexus running 4.3 JWR66Y, which bodes well for a firmware update in the near future.

To learn more about the changes made on the 2013 Nexus 7 build, head over to XDA Recognized Contributor sfhub‘s original thread. To get the goods on your own Nexus device without the wait, head over to the Nexus Factory Images page. Finally, if you wish to build your own ROMs from source for your Nexus device(s) and want the latest driver binaries, head over to the Nexus Driver Binaries page.

Did this update fix your 2013 Nexus 7′s GPS woes and erratic multi-touch? Let us know what you think of the updates in the comment box below!

Samsung-128GB-NAND-chip-2

Android 4.3′s launch last week has been nothing short of an almost resounding success. Why “almost?” Well, aside from a few issues with copy/paste, most users seem to be quite happy with the latest iteration of Jelly Bean. This level of user satisfaction is to be expected, as the latest flavor of Jelly Bean brings added performance, improved API support, additional functionality, and a few other features. One of these “other features,” however, is quite important for those of us who frequently transfer massive amounts of data to our devices such as media content and other large files.

Of course, as you might expect, I’m talking about how 4.3 also brings TRIM support to all Nexus devices. Anyone who has ever experienced a massive device slowdown after transferring large quantities of data to and from a NAND device knows what I’m talking about. For a very practical example, one need only look at Google’s original Nexus 7. Back when it first came out, reviews for the popular device nearly unanimously praised it for its high level of performance. However as time went on, most users seemed to notice a rather sharp I/O performance decline. This lead to an overall feeling of sluggishness when using the device, making the once fast tablet almost unusably slow for some. This issue seemed to affect those with lower capacity models more severely, or at least more quickly, than those with the 32 GB model. As you would expect, this was largely due to TRIM not being enabled in previous builds. This then prevented the scheduling of NAND blocks for garbage collection, making rewriting data to these blocks significantly slower. (Note: Traces of TRIM were added back in the Nexus 7 4.1.2 builds, but the current consensus is that it wasn’t actually enabled until 4.3.)

Looking into the Android Git, one can readily find the modifications to Android’s volume daemon (VOLD) to enable fstrim. The next step is determining when exactly fstrim runs. As exposed by some detective work by Brian Klug over at Anandtech:

I’ve learned a bit more on the conditions underlying when Android 4.3 will TRIM filesystems, as it wasn’t completely clear before. The Android framework will send out a “start idle maintenance window” event that the MountService listens for, and then invokes vold to fstrim filesystems when a few conditions have been met – the device hasn’t been touched for over an hour, no idle maintenance window event has been sent in 24 hours, and the device is either off-charger with 80% battery or on-charger with 30% battery. The goal is to have fstrim run roughly once every 24 hours if you’re in the habit of plugging the device in to charge every night.

Fstrim sends the FITRIM ioctl() command to all writable filesystems when invoked, which discards (TRIMs) blocks on the eMMC not used by the filesystem. Without TRIM the controller will track blocks that have data deleted by the filesystem, but the controller still believes has data it needs to track. TRIM is the signaling pathway through which the filesystem and OS can tell the controller that it can now consider those blocks unused and for garbage collection – different controllers will behave differently since it’s their prerogative to decide what happens next however.

In other words, if your device is idle and plugged in for over an hour, it will run the “start idle maintenance window” event. However, this will only take place if the “start idle maintenance window” event hasn’t been sent in the past 24 hours, and if your battery level is either greater than 80% or you are plugged in and have greater than 30% battery. Another way to invoke TRIM is to use a frontend for the fstrim utility and force TRIM to be executed using an app such as XDA Senior Member AuxLV‘s Lagfix application.

All of this is unimportant without tangible performance gains. So what can you expect from 4.3 in terms of I/O performance? Over the next couple of days, I set to find out on two daily use devices. I’m going to be running tests using Androbench Storage Benchmark before and after upgrading from official JDQ39 (4.2.2) to official JWR66V (4.3) on my personal Nexus 7 (8 GB) and Nexus 10 (16 GB). Both devices have received heavy usage, with much data being transferred to and from the devices, and about as many deletions. After the “after” tests are run, I will then root the devices and use the LagFix fstrim frontend to force TRIM manually and rerun the benchmarks. Stay tuned and keep checking the Portal for updates!

jb-android-43

We were all expecting it. In fact, we’ve all been waiting for it ever since this year’s Google I/O. However, that conference came and went, without a trace of Android 4.3. But after last week’s Android 4.3 leak, we knew it was finally coming soon. And in today’s Google event, which also marked the release of the Nexus 7 refresh, it has finally been made official.

So what’s new in this latest flavor of Jelly Bean? Here are some of the key changes, courtesy of the Android Developers blog post:

  • OpenGL ES 3.0 — Game developers can now take advantage of OpenGL ES 3.0 and EGL extensions as standard features of Android, with access from either framework or native APIs.
  • Bluetooth Smart — Now your apps can communicate with the many types of low-power Bluetooth Smart devices and sensors available today, to provide new features for fitness, medical, location, proximity, and more.
  • Restricted profiles — Tablet owners can create restricted profiles to limit access to apps, for family, friends, kiosks, and more. Your app can offer various types of restrictions to let tablet owners control its capabilities in each profile.
  • New media capabilities — A modular DRM framework enables media application developers to more easily integrate DRM into their own streaming protocols such as MPEG DASH. Apps can also access a built-in VP8 encoder from framework or native APIs for high-quality video capture.
  • Notification access — Your apps can now access and interact with the stream of status bar notifications as they are posted. You can display them in any way you want, including routing them to nearby Bluetooth devices, and you can update and dismiss notifications as needed.
  • Improved profiling tools — New tags in the Systrace tool and on-screen GPU profiling give you new ways to build great performance into your app.

Much has also been done to improve UI performance. Most notably, the Android 4.3 Platform Highlights page mentions a change to the hardware-accelerated 2D subsystem that modifies the stream of drawing commands to send the commands to the GPU in an optimized manner. And in instances when the CPU is required, these operations are now multi-threaded, allowing the use of multiple CPU cores. Improved window buffer allocation also speeds up buffer allocation, resulting in speedier rendering starts. And to best harness the GPU’s power in 2D hardware-accelerated tasks, the system now uses OpenGL ES 3.0 for optimized texture management and to maintain higher gradient rendering fidelity. Of course, however, the main use of OpenGL ES 3.0 will be to provide game developers with the framework and native API access they need to produce high quality and efficient games.

Another major highlight in this Jelly Bean refresh is a substantial refresh to the notification system, whereby third-party apps can observe the stream of notifications and display them or transfer them to nearby connected Bluetooth devices. And just as before, notifications can be enabled or disabled per app. Building upon this, however, now users are allowed to see and toggle which apps have access to the notification stream.

The tablet multi-user feature has also been revamped. Now in 4.3, users are given the option to set up restricted profiles. This allows owners to easily create separate environments for each user, with the ability to manage restrictions in apps available in those environments. This feature is aimed to sharing your device with friends and use at kiosks.

Other notable changes include Bluetooth Smart Ready to aid in discovery and communication with nearby devices, Bluetooth AVRCP 1.3 support for richer interactions with media streaming devices, an improved DRM framework, and a VP8 video encoder.

You can learn more by heading over to the Android Developers blog post and Android 4.3 Platform Highlights page. If you’re lucky enough to own a Google Nexus 4, Nexus 7, Nexus 10, or Galaxy Nexus, you can expect this update to come over-the-air shortly. And if you find yourself impatiently waiting, you can get a head start and download the images by visiting the Nexus device factory images.

erUIug4

We’ve all seen them before. You know, those fancy UI mockups that show how an app would look on a particular device. They not only help put the finishing touches on your app’s Play store listing, but they also help give your app a good first impression of being highly polished—before users even get a chance to try it out. And you know what they say about first impressions.

So how would one go about creating one of these mockups? Well, one way to do this would be to manually take an app screenshot and overlay it atop a Photoshopped image of your target device of choice. However, that could range in quality from excellent to laughable, depending on your skills with your favorite image editor.

This is where XDA Forum Member bydox comes in. Hoping to make the process more streamlined and increase overall end result quality, he released a set of minimal design mockups for five popular devices, the Samsung Galaxy S 4, Google Nexus 4, HTC One, Nokia Lumia 920, and a certain unnamed fruitphone. All phones other than the Lumia and Nexus 4 are available in 2 colors: black and white. The Nexus 4 is only available in black, and the Lumia 920 is available in six different colors. The goods come in the form of 300 dpi PSD and PNG files, allowing you to export high resolution images once you’ve found what part of your app you want to highlight.

Head over to the original thread to start putting the finishing touches on marketing your app.

nexusae0_nexus4_thumb

Every year, Android users wait in anticipation for signs of leaked updates. The disappointment end users faced when Google delayed announcing Android 4.3 at Google I/O will soon be outweighed due to a leaked system dump by XDA Forum Member ManOnTheMoon.

The dump is available as a Team Win Recovery Project backup for the Nexus 4. Android Police has been tracking the dump, and they verified the legitimacy of it at approximately late last evening, which was originally obtained by Jeff Williams. JWR66N has unofficially been released into the wild. Although the radio and bootloader are still missing, ManOnTheMoon promised they would be available tomorrow.

Users who decide to install the leaked update should do so with caution, and after making a full Nandroid backup. There is speculation that Google’s July 24 event may give us a peak into 4.3, so those of you who are feeling less adventurous may want to wait for the official announcement.

ddb

ddbOne of our goals for the year has been to better organize all of the development works (ROMs, apps, tools, kernels, etc.) on XDA. We wanted this to be useful but also to have minimal impact on how developers post to XDA and on users who are happy with the current structure of the forums.

We’re currently testing a system, we call the Development Database (or DevDB for short) on a handful of forums (Galaxy S IIXperia Z, Galaxy Note II, Droid DNA, Nexus 4, Nexus 7). You’ll note that when you go to the gateway to those forums, such as that for the Xperia Z, you can now see a tab for ROMs. Each ROM is linked to a forum thread– just as it’s always been. But when you click through to these threads, you’ll notice that they’ve become “enhanced” with a shiny new menu bar as shown in the below screenshot. Developers have the option of which features they want to include for each project:

- Feature Requester
- Bug Reporter
- Screenshots
- Downloads (via our own torrent tracker)
- Q&A Thread Linking
- Reviews

READ ON »

n4-product-herokau56

By now, you’ve no doubt heard of Paranoid Android. In fact, there’s a good chance that if you own the Galaxy Nexus, Nexus 4Nexus 7, or Nexus 10; you’re either running the ROM yourself or you’ve given it a try in the past.

For the few unfamiliar, Paranoid Android’s defining characteristic is what they call Hybrid Engine. Contrary to what many believe, this is not “tablet mode,” though that is one of many things that can be accomplished using Hybrid Engine. Rather, Hybrid Engine allows you to select both dpi and layout on a per-app basis. Rather than being forced to modify the look of your entire device, you can optimize your applications to what works best for each and every one.

A new and important feature that has come to light in the recent beta builds, and now sees light in the official release of PA3 is the PIE control system. What this allows one to do is to disable onscreen buttons and use a swipe gesture to access various common functions, thereby freeing up valuable screen real estate. The menu can be seen in the header image above, as well as the video below.

Per-app color, another significant feature in PA3 and recent pre-release builds, allows you set system UI colors on a per-app basis. Want a black system bar for your launcher, but a blue one for Facebook? No problem. Have more eccentric choices in mind? That’s fine too.

The most recent (and most specific) addition is screen calibration for the Google Nexus 4. While the vast majority of third-party reviews have praised the device for its screen, build quality, responsiveness, and overall value; some have been quick to point out that the screen seems under-saturated, especially to those coming from  overly saturated S-AMOLED devices. Rather than trying to offer a simple band-aid solution with RGB calibration, PA3 also corrects for the device’s gamma issues to give it the punch the IPS panel deserves. While you’ll be hard-pressed to find  anyone who says that the Nexus 4 screen looks “bad,” the calibration has been met with much praise thus far, and the team only hopes that these changes are incorporated upstream.

Are you salivating yet? Those eager to get started should visit the threads below. Naturally, there will also be a plethora of unofficial ports for various unsupported devices. So if you’re looking for a build for your device, be sure to check in your device forum to see if someone’s already attempted porting the ROM. Even better, you could always try porting and building the ROM from source yourself.

Advertisement

XDA TV: Most Recent Video

Buy/Sell on Swappa