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Posts Tagged: Google Nexus 4

chainfire avatar

Unless you’ve been hiding under a rock somewhere, you know that Google has released a few new devices (Nexus 4 and Nexus 10), as well as a refresh to the Nexus 7. What makes this different from previous Nexus releases is that there are two new manufacturers added to the mix with Asus (Nexus 7) and LG (Nexus 4) joining Samsung (Nexus 10 as well as Nexus S and Galaxy Nexus) and HTC (Nexus One).

We recently told you about XDA Elite Recognized Developer Chainfire’s new project to automatically root devices and keep them as stock as possible, and we now have an important update to share with you, as Chainfire has added CF-Auto-Root support for the new Nexus devices. What makes this update different from previous versions is that fastboot support has been enabled, as well as an updated version of SuperSU (v0.99).

Follow the links below to learn more and to obtain the downloads.

drivermanualdelete

Earlier, we brought you news that the universal naked driver received a well deserved update. For those who are unaware of the universal naked driver, it is a project that fits as many drivers as possible into a single driver install to save new users hassle. It’s been updated once again, and this time for the newer Nexus devices.

The new update supports the Nexus 4, Nexus 10, Nexus Q, and—even though it’s a little late—the Nexus S. XDA Senior Member 1wayjonny posted the update in the Nexus 4 forums. The drivers are supported on Windows XP, Vista, 7, and 8.

For most Windows machines, it’s a matter of installing the drivers like any other driver, which is install and go. Windows 8 users may have a more complicated time installing it, but it’s still pretty easy. 1wayjonny posted a tutorial for Windows 8 users to disable driver signature enforcement, so that the drivers can be installed correctly. Once installed, all your devices should be supported under a single driver. For anyone who has a number of devices or plans on adding a member of the Nexus family to their device list, this is definitely something to check out.

To learn more, check out the original thread.

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Snap_2012.11.19_00h06m15s_001_

While one-click tools have been a subject of much debate, developers are still developing them and users are still using them. They often come in the form of one-click methods and all-in-one toolkits. They can be helpful with a variety of things. Now, the Nexus 4, which recently achieved root, has its own.

The toolkit comes from XDA Senior Moderator and Recognized Developer mskip, who usually does Samsung devices, but has made an exception for the latest Nexus device. The features include:

* Install correct adb/fastboot drivers automatically on Windows xp/vista/7/8 32bit+64bit
* Backup/Restore a single package or all apps, user data and Internal Storage
* Backup your /data/media (virtual SD Card) to your PC for a Full Safe backup of data
* Unlock/Re-Lock your Bootloader
* Root Stock Jelly Bean builds (upto 4.2.0 JOP40C)
* 1-Click For All to Unlock, Root, Rename the Restore File
* Perform a FULL NANDROID Backup of your system (Boot, Cache, Data, Recovery and System) via adb and save in Custom Recovery format on your PC which can be Restored via CWM Recovery
* Pull /data and /system folders, compress to a .tar file and save to your PC
* Dump selected Phone Partitions, compress to a .zip file with md5 and save to your PC
* Install BusyBox on your phone
* Extras, Tips and Tricks section available to all ToolKit Donators
* Mods section to automatically perform certain tasks on your phone
* Download Google Stock Image directly to correct ToolKit folder for extracting and flashing (no need to move it manually anymore)
* Flash Custom Recovery or Google Stock Image to phone
* Rename the Recovery Restore File present on some Stock Roms
* Boot into CWM Touch Recovery without Flashing it
* Boot or Flash .img Files directly from your PC
* Install a single apk or multiple apk’s to your phone
* Push Files from your PC to your phone
* Pull Files from your phone to your PC
* Dump selected LogCat buffers to your PC
* Dump BugReport to your PC
* Set Files Permissions on your phone
* Open new Command Prompt for manual input
* Reboot Phone to Fastboot Mode or Android from fastboot mode
* Reboot Phone to Fastboot Mode, Recovery, Android or Download Mode from adb mode

So if you have the Nexus 4 and you need pretty much anything, this is the toolkit to get. The highlights include root, recovery, busybox, and bootloader unlock. However, there are some tools available that could be very handy. Backing up the virtual SD card, for instance. Also, dumping various logs can help users help developers. We all know how much developers love logcats.

For more details, check out the original thread.

Ermagerd Ferr Gerr

Nov 23 Update: It appears that the modem does indeed work on band 4 (1700 MHz / 2100 MHz)! Instructions on how to enable the functionality can be found here! Essentially, you need to enter *#*#4636#*#* into the dialer, select Phone Information, and set Preferred Network Type to one of the LTE options. Depending on your carrier, you may also need to modify your APN settings. Work is now being done to try and enable bands 1 and 2. READ ON »

Nexus4

The Nexus 4 was just recently released, and naturally it didn’t take long for developers to achieve root and start releasing development work. With all Nexus devices, unlocking the bootloader is fairly simple. You need the Android SDK for Fastboot support, and you simply enter fastboot OEM unlock.

First came ClockworkMod Recovery for the Google Nexus 4 thanks to Koush. The update was posted to the forums by XDA Forum Member fkrone. The recovery is the official version of ClockworkMod Touch, and it seems to be highly functional.

For those who prefer more eye candy and an even greater number of additional features, XDA Recognized Developer Dees_Troy has ported his famous Team Win Recovery Project 2.3 to the device. As usual, the TWRP 2.3 port includes all of the previously covered goodies such as a fancy themable GUI, ORS support, and much more.

For more details, check out the TWRP 2.3 and ClockworkMod threads!

Jordan1119

Jelly Bean Leak, Nexus device rooted, Windows 8 and wireless device manufacturers’ agreements—all this and more covered on today’s episode of XDA Developer TV. Android News specialist Jordan talks about the Jelly Bean leak for the international variant of the Samsung Galaxy S II. Also mentioned is the article talking about more and more Windows 8 apps being released.

In rooting news, Jordan mentions the rooting guide for the Droid DNA device. Also, to the surprise of no one, the Nexus 4 has been rooted. Finally, Jordan mentions the agreement between HTC and Apple and Samsung’s demands to see the particulars of this agreement. Pull up a chair and check out this video.

READ ON »

Android 4.2 for Nexus Devices

The past few hours have been quite exciting for Nexus device owners. Earlier today, Google started rolling out the Android 4.2 Jelly Bean OTA to the Google Play variant of the GSM/HSPA+ Galaxy Nexus (takju). The OTA update file was shared with us by XDA Senior Member HAKA, along with installation instructions for all GSM/HSPA+ variants of Galaxy Nexus (yakju and yakjuxx). The method involves first installing the latest 4.1.2 takju factory image on non-takju devices, to be able to install the 4.2 update. However, there is no longer any need for that.

Hours ago, Google uploaded Android 4.2 factory images for not just the Galaxy Nexus, but also for Nexus 7 (both WiFi and GSM/HSPA+), Nexus 10, and Nexus 4. While an official yakju image for Galaxy Nexus is still not available, the takju factory images can directly be installed to any yakju or yakjuxx device.

In case the code names have your mind in a jumble, takju is the Galaxy Nexus variant sold by Google in the US Play Store, which comes with Google Wallet pre-installed. Yakju is the exact same device sold internationally by Google, but doesn’t ship with Google Wallet. Yakjuxx is the exact same device sold internationally by Samsung. Google directly updates takju and yakju, while yakjuxx devices are updated by Samsung.

You can download factory images for all these devices at the Android Developers Website.

3oFPl

Several pictures of the LG-built Google Nexus 4 have been showing up across the Internet. The featured image in this article really caught my eye because it shows the internals of the device relatively well. While this device has not yet been released, a lot can be said (and judged) about a device’s hardware, even without full board shots. Overall, it appears to show that LG’s build quality is considerably lower than that of the Samsung Nexus devices in the past. In this article, I intend to write about the design pros and cons of the highly anticipated Nexus 4.

Design Pluses

Large external speaker - One of the biggest complaints with Samsung’s designs is the low powered/small sized speaker. While it delivers a trade-off in battery life versus sound quality/quantity,  the Nexus 4’s larger speaker should suffice to produce adequate sound.

Good speaker placement – The speaker placement on the Nexus 4 places the speaker at the corner of the device rather than the center, where your palm blocks it in portrait mode. While the Galaxy Nexus forces you to hold the device in an odd position to bounce sound from your palm to your ear while in portrait mode, the Nexus 4 will not have this problem. The corner orientation places the speaker in a optimal position for both landscape and horizontal palm redirection while watching movies.   This same orientation can be seen on the Meizu MX.

 

Design Minuses

Bolted in battery – The defining line between “Operator Replaceable” and “Qualified Service Technician” is the use of tools. The Nexus 4 not only requires a screw driver, but the plastic tabs on the edges will break if removed improperly. Once those tabs are broken, signal quality will be lost from the connection with the Spring Antenna Connections.

Spring Antenna Connections – The problem with Spring Antenna Connections or simply Spring Connections in general is: When tension is lost, signal is lost. Loss of tension between the back plate and the board can occur when a tab breaks or the back plate is warped. Warping of back plates can occur easily, and is quite frequent as devices age from stress, dropping, impact, or even a day in a hot car. You may notice some old devices such as remote controls or phones will squeak and creek when you press on them. This noise is generally attributed to warping or breakage of tabs, which would be critical for the WiFi/NFC/data/GPS/Bluetooth connections on the Nexus 4.

Lack of impact zones – Many current devices including Samsung’s entire lineup include impact areas around the bolts and the edge of the device.  This allows the device to sustain impact without altering the physical structure of the board, causing components to come lose.  The absence of impact areas causes a device to be more fragile and less resistant to impacts.  This also increases a device’s warpage risk, which can alter device dimensions and cause the Spring Connections to fail.

Tape used instead of structure and shielding – A well designed device will use its own structure to hold components in place. Tape is a disposable part. Disposable parts have no place inside of a properly designed device. The disadvantage here is tape can take components off the board when removed. Tape is also messy, and leaves residue on a board and other components. There is never a situation when using tape instead of physical structure is required, and the use of tape is often a harbinger for other build quality problems.

Recommendations for next revision

Make the speaker grill bigger – A speaker grill is designed to keep the operator’s fingers out, not to keep water out.  The small size of the speaker grill on the Nexus 4 will impede speaker sound and motion, and thus the overall dB level. This physical obsturction means the speaker wastes power on compression of air rather than audible sound creation.

Replace the battery tape – Instead of using tape for the battery, a slight overhang at the bottom of the metalized battery section will suffice to keep the battery from moving around inside the device.  Another way is to place glue or double-sided tape on the bottom of the battery.

Replace the communications tape – Instead of metalized tape on the communications section of the board, use a physical shield cap, which makes it serviceable and more tidy.

Use impact zones - Impact zones prolong device life.

Use a physical connector and a film substrate for the back cover - The back cover of the device consists of several separate connections spread across the entire device.  This means warpage anywhere in that area can cause the device to lose connectivity.   The primary focus of a mobile device is connectivity, and that should not be trusted to spring connections. The spring connections should be replaced with a physical connector of some sort. A physical connector would also save space.

Do not bolt down batteries - Batteries should be easily removable in the event of a problem.  Getting the rear cover off is enough work.  The compression method has been trusted across the spring connectors on the board, which are held in place solely by pressure. A proper connector holds itself in place. A slight bit of foam-rubber would do the same job as a spring, save space, save tools and remove the need for “tools” when replacing the battery.

Do not put the IMEI on the back cover – There will surely be aftermarket accessories for the device or people who want to replace the back cover, or add an extended battery.  The IMEI should be on the board, or at least bolted to the device.

At first glance, the Nexus 4’s hardware appears to be a quality downgrade from the Galaxy nexus which we reviewed previously.  After release we hope to be able to give a much better analysis.

[Photo Credit: Reddit]

 

Android-4.2-Logo-Mockup-420x269

Ever since the Nexus 4 and 10 were announced last week, things here at XDA have been moving around non-stop.  Not only were fora for these two devices added almost immediately, but we also learned that Android 4.2 would actually be an updated version of Jelly Bean. Tons of new first-party features become available with the update, such as a brand new (and very smart) keyboard as well as a camera that allows you to truly capture the essence of the world around you. However, as fun as new leaked APKs are, our developers are much more interested in more substantial leaks.

Thanks to a thread created by XDA Forum Member ingbrzy, we are excited to learn that there was a leak of the LG Nexus 4 system image floating around the Internet. Ingbrzy linked to this dump, and just like that, things were set in motion. Why is this important? Well, since the 4.2 version has not been officially released as of yet, developers who are itching to get their hands on it to start working on ports can now get a head start before Google officially updates the AOSP site with the new download. So, what can people expect out of this? Probably nothing yet as the ROM is specifically made for the LG Nexus 4. As such, there are compatibility issues that will need to be overcome before anyone sees a fully working port of this dump. Having said that, developers work quite quickly, so it would not be surprising to see some alphas or betas surfacing within the next few days, if not sooner.

If you are a dev and want to try your hand at porting this, please head over to the thread in the link below and download the system dump. Have fun, and welcome to the future!

 all files DOWNLOAD from here..

You can find more information in the original thread.

Want something published in the Portal? Contact any News Writer.

[Thanks xHausx for the tip!]

nexusfamily

Earlier today, we announced the creation of forums for the US Samsung Galaxy Note II, Motorola Droid RAZR HD, and the Meizu MX. Now, we would like to share an even bigger announcement. Following Google’s unveiling of the Nexus 4 and 10, we have created two new forums for the newest arrivals in the Nexus family.

First up is the Google Nexus 10. With a retina-besting 2560×1600 resolution, the Samsung-built tablet packs the world’s highest resolution tablet display. And at 10.055 inches, this equates to 300 ppi. It is powered by the latest generation Exynos 5250 processor, which features two ARM Cortex A15 cores running at 1.7 GHz and a powerful ARM Mali T604 GPU. The device comes with 2 GB of RAM, and either 16 or 32 GB of internal storage.

Next is the Google Nexus 4. The LG-built phone is powered by a 1.5 GHz quad-core Qualcomm Snapdragon S4 Pro processor, featuring four Krait cores and the class-leading Adreno 320 GPU. In addition to the fast processor, the Nexus 4 also packs 2 GB of RAM and either 8 or 16 GB of internal storage. The device also features a 4.7″ 720p display, delivering 320 ppi.

The Nexus 4 will sell unlocked for $299 (8 GB) and $349 (16 GB). The Nexus 10 will come in at $399 (16 GB) and $499 (32 GB). Both devices will ship with Android 4.2, a revamped version of Jelly Bean, and are slated to launch on November 13th. Want to get in on the action? If so, make sure to head over to the newly created forums listed below and check out the Google Nexus website and official blog post!

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