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Posts Tagged: Google

Google News and Weather 2

Although Google has somewhat gotten out of the habit of their previously unrelenting Update Wednesday sessions, the middle of the week is still prime time for first party Android application updates. Today, we have been graced by not one, but two updates. And surprisingly, one of the two is for an app that hasn’t received a formal app update in… well… ever.

The first update, which actually started making its way out to devices yesterday afternoon, is for Google News and Weather. For those who don’t remember, this application has essentially remained unchanged ever since the Android 2.x days. Although over the years it received a minor color scheme update, its core functionality has been unchanged since its inception.

Now, Google News and Weather version 2 (up from 1.3) has made its debut in the Google Play Store, and it brings essentially an entirely new user experience. For starters, there’s now a slide-out “hamburger menu” available from any screen, which lets you shift between news categories. Sliding left and right still takes you through the categories, though there’s no longer a tabbed indicator up top. There’s also a new main screen, complete with top stories and a better weather indicator. The app also gives a new information screen when opened the first time to show you all of the new features. Finally, the UI itself has been fully updated to make use of the now nearly ubiquitous Material Design-styled colors that Google’s first party Android apps are starting to follow.

In addition to the massive Google News and Weather update, we have a minor update to Google Maps. Coming in at version 8.3.1 (up from 8.2.0), this is primarily a bugfix update from what we can see.

The Google News and Weather update is available for all supported devices straight on Google Play, but for some reason it doesn’t appear to be available in all regions and for all devices. As such, we’ve gone ahead and mirrored both APKs on our Google Drive for your early access, sideloading pleasure:

[Many thanks to XDA Portal Supporter MihirGosai for the APKs and info!]

Google Android Apps

We’re one day shy of Google’s traditional Update Wednesday, but despite this, the first party app updates for the week have already started rolling in. So far, we have a rather substantial update to the Google+ app, as well as minor incremental updates to Chrome beta, Search, and YouTube. And like always, we’ve gone ahead and mirrored the APKs for your sideloading pleasure.

First off, we have the most significant update, Google+. Today’s update brings us to version 4.5.0.72928916 (up from 4.4.1.68642489 just over two months ago). As you would expect in a jump from 4.4 to 4.5, today’s update packs quite a bit of new functionality. Most notably, today’s update brings the ability to cast a feed of your circles’ photos, videos, and more directly to your TV using the Google Chromecast. This playback feed can then be controlled (paused, advanced, returned) by the client app on your phone or tablet. The ability to Cast your Stream seems to be account based, so not everyone who updates to 4.5 will have the option. But since the APK is now rolling out via the Play Store, we can’t imagine that it’ll be too long before all accounts have the ability to do so.

In addition to the massive Google+ update, we have some relatively minor updates to Chrome Beta, Google Search, and the YouTube app. These bring the apps up to Chrome Beta 37.0.2062.71, YouTube 5.9.0.12, and Search 3.6.14.1337016 (ARM only). Chrome Beta’s update brings a small menu animation tweak and address bar completion arrows, and the YouTube update appears to have solved an issue when used in conjunction with certain GAPPs packages. Search just appears to be simple bugfix updates based on version number changes and lack of user-facing feature changes, but as always, any new update is better than none.

As always, these updates are gradually making their way out to consumer devices via Google Play Store. But of course, not every device will get the updates in the initial wave. Luckily, we’ve gone ahead and mirrored the updates on our Google Drive account for your early access, sideloading pleasure:

[Many thanks to XDA Portal Supporter MihirGosai for the tip, APKs, and info on what's changed!]

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Google Android Apps

It’s Wednesday, and you know what that (most likely, but not always) means. It’s time for another Google Update Wednesday. Although we had no formal Google Update Wednesday last week, the fine folks over at Mountain View haven’t forgotten about us. Today, we receive two moderately sized updates to Google Play music and YouTube, as well as a minor update to Google Hangouts.

First up, we have the update to YouTube, which actually started making its way out to consumer devices late last night. Coming in at version 5.9.0.10 (up from 5.7), today’s update brings a few new tricks to the table. Given the rather large version number jump, one would expect a major increase in user-facing features. This, however, is unfortunately not the case. That said, there are tweaks to Playlist handling, including a new “View All” playlists button in the “hamburger” slide-out menu that takes you to all of your playlists. Once there (or anywhere else with a playlist), you can now click on the three button context menu for that playlist and either save or share it.

Next, we have Google Play Music. Today’s update takes us to version 5.6.1616P.1323377, up from version 5.5 from a few months back. This update packs a bit more meat than the YouTube update, bringing several user-facing changes. Perhaps most noteworthy, version 5.6.1616P.1323377 brings major changes to the application’s widgets. There’s a new 1×1 “I’m Feeling Lucky” widget that corresponds with the music player app’s similarly named option. In addition, there is a new 3×1 widget with a cleaner and more aesthetically appealing color scheme, which can also be resized to 4×4 to display album art in addition to controls. Finally, the Download Queue area has been renamed to Manage Downloads, and it displays your free storage space in the top.

Finally, we have a minor update to Google Hangouts, which takes us to version 2.1.317 (up from 2.1.311 released two months ago). This update, unlike the first two, appears to be just a minor bugfix release. As such, there are no user-visible changes that can be seen. That said, an update’s an update, and we’ve got your fix as well.

All of these app updates will make their way out to consumer devices through the Play Store via a staged rollout. Naturally, not every device will be in initial wave. However, we’ve gone ahead and mirrored the APKs over on our Google Drive account for your sideloading pleasure:

[Many thanks to XDA Portal Supporter MihirGosai for the APKs!]

Chrome Beta 37 Material Design

With Android L on the horizon, it’s no surprise that Google’s preparing itself for the upcoming major changes to its mobile platform. Undoubtedly, much of these changes are due to Android L’s new UI paradigm, Material Design. Just two days ago, Google issued a rather significant update to the Play Store that brought with it the first traces of Material Design. Now, Google’s given a similar makeover to its Chrome Browser beta channel.

Today’s update brings Chrome Beta to version number 37.0.2062.39 (up from 36.0.1985.81 last month). As one would expect from a major version number change, Chrome Beta 37 brings a few new tricks to the table. According to the official release notes on the Chrome Releases Blog:

This release contains a number of new features including:

  • Material Design updates
  • Simplified sign-in
  • Lots of bug fixes and performance improvements!

This update’s main claim to fame is undoubtedly the first bullet: Material Design. This manifests itself in the form of a lightly tweaked tab switcher interface, reminiscent of the new Recents menu found in the Android L developer preview, as well as a larger omnibar, refreshed action overflow menu, and more open typography.  Unfortunately, individual tabs do not yet tie into the Android L Recents feature, as was promised in the Google I/O 2014 keynote. Strangely, the tab selector button no longer shows you how many open tabs you have. And at this time, it’s unclear as to whether this is a limitation of the developer preview or if Chrome simply hasn’t taken advantage of the feature just yet.

Just like what’s always the case with Chrome Beta channel updates, this version should already be live for everyone in the Google Play Store. But since not everyone has access to the Play Store, we’ve gone ahead and mirrored the APK for your sideloading pleasure.

Google Play Store 4.9.13

It’s not Wednesday yet, but we’ve got a great Google first party Android app update to share. Rather than an app update in the traditional sense, today’s update is actually to the Google Play Store–and this new version packs quite a nice visual makeover that features a new and image-rich UI, as well as a hint of Material Design.

Today’s update to the Google Play Store brings the virtual storefront to version 4.9.13, up from version 4.8.22 that we shared just six days ago. And as you can expect from a relatively significant version number change, 4.9 brings a few very noticeable visual changes. For starters, when you access any particular Play Store entry–be it audio, video, apps, or written content–you are given a new image-rich listing page. This new style, which is seen in the leftmost screenshot, makes it easier to get a sense of your potential app purchase, as well as allow developers to create more enticing listings. In addition, Play Store listings now feature a floating action bar menu that fades into place when scrolling down any entry. This, along with a new and more prominent Google+ section can be seen in the middle screenshot. Finally, an updated “What’s New” section can be seen in the rightmost screenshot. This can be summoned by tapping on the section and dismissed by either clicking the “x” or scrolling up past the content.

The update isn’t complete in its visual transformation, however. When first launching the app, users won’t see any readily apparent changes. At this time, only the listing pages appear to be changed. That said, the update is a good move in the right direction, and we can’t wait to see the rest of the app’s visual makeover–perhaps in time for Android L and Material Design in the Fall.

While Play Store 4.9 has already begun rolling out, it will naturally be some time before everyone receives the update. As such, we’ve gone ahead and mirrored the APK  for your sideloading pleasure.

[Many thanks to XDA Recognized Developer febycv for the APK!]

headshot-300x249

Our international xda:devcon ’14 in Manchester, UK on the weekend of September 26-28 is a celebration of all things mobile. The most popular sect of mobile development is perhaps software development. There are many different ways to develop software. You can use libraries and APIs to help advance your skills, among other things.

Today, we are happy to announce another great speaker that will be at xda:devcon ’14. MaR-V-iN is a computer science student, privacy enthusiast and hacker. MaR-V-iN started coding for Android at the end of Gingerbread era. Since then contributed to numerous Free Open Source Software projects. He is a big fan of penguins around him.

This year, MaR-V-iN’s presentation will be about which APIs are missing on non-Google systems, how they work, with specific focus on Play Services and what developers should do about it. Entitled “The Google in Android™,” this presentation talks about how since the first release of Android, Google has been an integral part of Android. At Android’s beginning, most apps by Google were just standard apps and use was not forced. More recently, however, Google started providing APIs through these apps. Since the rollout of alternative AOSP distributions, Google increasingly provides APIs through “Google Play Services” and the corresponding library. While Google claims that they’re combating fragmentation between Android versions this way, they’re in fact targeting fragmentation between Android and alternative AOSP distributions. So check out this talk to learn more about Google’s APIs, this is the talk for you.

Join us September 26 to 28 in Manchester for XDA:DevCon 2014. Register to attend using this link for exclusive savings. Hurry, as the Early Bird registration ends August 1st.

the-nsa-trained-edward-snowden-to-be-an-elite-hacker

Software is never completely secure. If you think otherwise, you are in for a rude awakening. Every now and then, hackers will find a way to take control of an app or expose private data–for money, fun, or fame. Motives varies, but these types of hackers are extremely talented, and often their potential is wasted to illegal activities. One of good guys in finding and neutralizing security flaws is Google. Current efforts have been focused mainly on their own products like Chrome OS or Chrome browser. But now, the whole idea of protecting the Internet has gone to a new level.

The Android Open Source Project is a good example of how the community can be used to make a big project used by millions safer and more complete. Android isn’t made only by developers gathered together in Mountain View. We’ve seen some contributions made by multiple XDA developers like Senior Recognized Developers jcase and Chainfire. Google obviously found out that some talented hackers are spread all over the world, so they came up with a new initiative, Google Project Zero. It’s a team made of top Google security researchers that have a sole mission to keep the world safe–free of security flaws, like the Heartbleed bug in OpenSSL project. Google Project Zero’s mission is to try and expose every security vulnerability and let companies know to fix them.

Google has already recruited some hackers from their own company and even XDA. New Zealander Ben Hawkes discovered dozens of bugs in software like Adobe Flash or Microsoft Office 2013. English researcher Tavis Ormandy discovered some zero-day vulnerabilities in antivirus software. Finally, George Hotz, for us known more as XDA Recognized Developer GeoHot, the creator of the Towelroot root exploit compatible with almost every device using an unpatched kernel. Before creating Towelroot, GeoHot was involved in iOS Jailbreaking and won the Pwnium hacking competition last March. Last but not least is Ian Beer. With such an All-Star team, Internet users will one day be a bit more safe.

It’s remain unanswered whether Google Project Zero will be a successful initiative. That said, exposing the flaws in order to encourage and allow companies to fix them is an innovative project, and other companies should follow the Google’s path in making the Web a safer place to work, communicate, and simply have fun.

[Source: Google | Via Wired.com]

google maps 8

Yesterday, we had a rather typical Google Update Wednesday, with major updates to Google Wallet and Chrome Stable, as well as a minor update to the Google Play Store. Now, Google is following up on yesterday’s updates with a major revision to Google Maps, which brings elevation info when using biking navigation and better support for voice input.

Perhaps the most interesting new feature in Maps 8.2 is elevation information in route planning. When viewing route options in biking mode, you now get a visual representation of route altitude This feature is currently reserved for those using biking directions, as it wouldn’t be of much use to those driving to their destination.

In addition to the new elevation info, you are also now able to issue voice commands while in navigation mode. Voice input is initiated by tapping on the microphone icon in the lower left hand corner of the display. Using voice input, you are able to ask Maps questions like, “how long until destination,” “what time will I get there,” “mute voice guidance,” “show a route overview,” “show traffic,” “what’s my next turn,” and so on. Unfortunately, however, Google’s traditional Fuzzy Logic voice input capabilities haven’t quite carried over into maps. So if you don’t say the exact right phrases, it doesn’t appear to work very consistently.

While Maps 8.2 has already begun rolling out, it will naturally be some time before everyone receives the update. As such, we’ve gone ahead and mirrored the APK  for your sideloading pleasure.

[Via AndroidPolice]

Google Android Apps

It’s Wednesday once again, and more often than not, that means that it’s time for another set of Google first party Android app updates. Today, we have major updates to Google Wallet and Chrome Stable, as well as a minor point revision to the Google Play Store.

First up, we have Google Wallet. Today’s update brings us to version 2.0-R172-v18 (up from the 2.0-R163-v17 update about two months ago). Despite not escalating much in terms of version number, it brings one key feature that has been in the works for some time: gift card management. In addition, it also allows you to ask for money directly within the app and send money for free using your debit card.

Next up, we have an update for Chrome Stable. This update brings the stable release channel to version 36.0.1985.122, up from last month’s 35.0.1916.141. It doesn’t add much in the way of user-facing features other than something we spotted in Chrome Beta last month when it was updated to version 36: improved text rendering on non-mobile sites.

Finally, we have a minor update to the Google Play Store, bringing it to 4.8.22 (up from 4.8.20). This update should proceed in the background for most people, and if not, you can manually request it by going to Play Store settings and tapping on the version number. However, this doesn’t always work for everyone, so we’ve gone ahead and mirrored it (and the other two updates) below for your sideloading pleasure:

[Many thanks to XDA Portal Supporter MihirGosai for the Play Store APK]

Google Android Apps

Although Google’s first party application update timing isn’t quite as predictable as it once was, “Google Update Wednesday” is still a thing. Today, Google has issued major updates to its first party Google Camera and Gmail apps, following up on a minor Google Search update that was issued yesterday.

The stars of the show here are Google Camera and Gmail. The update to Google Camera brings us up to version 2.3.017 (up from 2.2.024 a little over a month ago). This update brings support for Android Wear as well as a refreshed panorama mode interface. The new panorama and PhotoSphere interface increases visual polish by giving us larger and more visible guide circles, as well as a new in-app guide to show you how to get the best results.

Next up, we have a moderately significant update to Gmail. This update brings us to version 4.9 (1266230), up from version 4.8 last month. For those who don’t remember, last month’s update brought us the ability to save attachments directly to Google Drive from within Gmail. Today’s update takes the Google Drive integration one step further by allowing users to insert attachments directly from Drive. Google Drive-based attachments can be inserted just like standard local attachments, and they can be found in the action overflow menu in the compose screen.

Finally, we have a minor update to Google Search that brings us up to 3.5.16.1262550 (up from 3.5.14.1234234 just a few weeks ago). This update, which started rolling out yesterday, is pushing out to both x86 and ARM devices. It doesn’t seem to add any new functionality that we’ve noticed just yet. However, we don’t have too much reason to complain on that front, thanks to yesterday’s backend update.

All of these app updates will make their way out to consumer devices through the Play Store via a staged rollout. Naturally, not every device will be in initial wave. However, we’ve gone ahead and mirrored the APKs over on our Google Drive for your sideloading pleasure:

voice search correction

As accurate as Google Voice Search has become over the years, it’s still far from perfect–especially for less common words or when issuing search queries in noisy environment such as a car or crowded area. Now, a Google Search backend update update has made Voice Search a bit smarter by allowing you to correct misheard queries.

Google Voice Search has demonstrated contextual awareness for quite some time. For example, if you search for “Show me pictures of Renaissance art,” it shows you pictures of Renaissance art as you would expect. If you then follow this up with, “how about Baroque,” you are then shown pictures of Baroque art. Today’s update takes this one step further by allowing you to correct misheard search queries by simply saying “No, I said,” followed by the corrected query.

The results are pretty hit or miss right now, as Google Search seems to break contextual awareness somewhat frequently when correcting search queries. This is even more likely if you attempt to correct a misheard query multiple times. However, this added functionality is certainly a step in the right direction. And when used in conjunction with “OK Google Everywhere,” Voice Search is now even more useful for those in situations where direct device control isn’t the most convenient.

[Source: Google]

"OK Google" on any screen

You may recall how last week’s update to Google Search brought “OK Google” hotword detection to any screen, something which was previously only available when on the home screen of the Google Experience Launcher or in the Google Search app itself. We’ve now received one more update to Google Search, but even with this latest update, the revised hotword detection is only available to certain Google accounts. Luckily, root-enabled users were quick to find workarounds, but as we all know, not everyone’s running a rooted device.

Now, Redditors have found a way to get this working on any device and user account, without the use of any fancy root-enabled sorcery. The procedure itself involves nothing more than searching for “OK Google Everywhere.” After doing so and then backing out of Google Now, you’ll be able to go to Google Now Settings –> Voice –> OK Google Detection and enable hotword detection from any screen (including the lock screen).

This fix was originally found by Redditor xStreame, and it was then expanded upon and reposted by pr01etar1at:

  1. Open Google Now
  2. Search for “OK Google everywhere”
  3. Click any link [may be unnecessary but I did it]
  4. Back out to Google Now
  5. Go to Settings>Voice
  6. Audio History and Anywhere Detection should now be available as settings.

If you’ve been longing for the Moto X-like hotword detection from any screen, now’s your chance to get in on the fun. Now if only this could be extended to when the display is powered off for users willing to sacrifice a bit of battery life for this added functionality.

[Source: Reddit (1,2) | Thanks to everyone who sent this in!]

Google Android Apps

It’s still Wednesday in Mountain View, and you know what that means—it’s another Google Update Wednesday. Today, we have one entirely new application in the Play Store, two major app updates that bring Android L compatibility, and four other, more minor updates.

First off, we have Android Wear. Coming in at inaugural version 1.0.0.1261840, this app allows you to pair with and edit the parameters of your new Android Wear device–provided you’re one of the lucky few to already own one. In addition to basic device configuration settings, this app also allows you to control voice action preferences, as well as notification settings.

Next up, we have Google Docs 1.3.251.21 and Google Sheets 1.3.251.25. Those of you brave enough to be using the Android L Developer Preview on your daily driver device will have undoubtedly noticed that before today, Docs and Sheets simply would not install on L Preview. This changes today, thanks to updates to both of these apps. In addition, both updates now allow you to directly edit Microsoft Office (Excel and Word) files, just like what we saw in Slides not too long ago. If that’s not all, both apps have been given a touch of Material Design UI flair, thanks to a floating action button and trademark Material Design visual stylings.

Finally, we have minor updates to Search, YouTube, Slides, and Google Play Services. These updates come in at versions 3.5.15.1254529, 5.7.41, 1.0.783.22, and 5.0.84, respectively.

All of these app updates will make their way out to consumer devices through the Play Store via a staged rollout. Naturally, not every device will be in initial wave. However, we’ve gone ahead and mirrored the APKs over on our DevHost account for your sideloading pleasure:

Latest App Updates:

Google Play Services:

[Many thanks to XDA Portal Supporter MihirGosai for the APKs!]

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