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Posts Tagged: HTC Amaze 4g

cm10

Some devices are lucky enough to get unofficial updates to the latest Android builds in no time at all, others have to endure a little bit of a wait. Some devices however, such as the Amaze 4G, are left hanging just that little bit longer than most. Fortunately though for Amaze owners looking for CM10 on their device, the wait is now over.

XDA Recognized Developer sportsstar89 posted an unofficial build of CM10 for the device, which has all the major functionality you’ll need for daily use covered. Things such as WiFi, data, Bluetooth, GPS, audio, camera, CPU management, and so on work. However, as with any new build, there may be bugs. If you do happen to find that something isn’t working quite like it should, this is where your logcats come in handy. That said, there doesn’t seem to be anything too serious that would prevent you from enjoying CM10 on your Amaze. The usual rules apply: recovery, flash, flash GAPPS, and you’re good to go.

If you want to check this out for yourself and give your Amaze 4G a new lease of life, take a look at the original development thread and see how it runs.

Update – It seems that since I wrote this the build has been given approval by the CM team and is now oficially official.

htc-amaze-4G-android-updated

Manufacturers and developers have a long standing love/hate relationship that has kept the fragile ecosystem where we spend most of our free time intact. The dance beat is somewhat the same across all brands and, for the most part, all devices as well. Most manufacturers out there are held against certain standards (either due to their own internal procedures and codes or due to contractual obligations with carriers) that force them to do certain things on the devices they make that keep most of us away from exploiting them and unlocking their full potential. This comes in the form of locking of bootloaders, pseudo-impossible to crack signature verifications, and secretive documentation that more often than not, has a tendency to foil the efforts of people with the required skills to fix the inevitable issues that arise on every device.

The HTC Amaze 4G was a device that came out about a year and change ago that fell under some of these categories. One of the most crucial ones was the fact that the device’s WiFi drivers were out of reach of our developers. While the wlan TI drivers are part of the kernel (which is GPL licensed), there are certain parts of it that are normally not licensed under this particular model, and this driver was the case. The missing code gave most developers on the device headaches simply because without this code, WiFi on custom ROMs (and even stock ones) was lousy (if functional at all). Because of this and all the issues generated from it, a petition was started about 7 months ago by XDA member aj_2423. The petition essentially asked HTC to release the sources for the drivers so that devs could work on them, fixing the remaining bugs (after thousands of hours of reverse engineering). However, the petition, which reached over 500 signatures, seemed to have fallen on deaf ears.

Just today, HTC Global Online Communications Manager Jeff Gordon told us that after lots of deliberation and going back and forth with TI, both companies had agreed that the required sources could be released to the public. HTC had gone rather silent as of late in the developer world, as many people were becoming increasingly dissatisfied with the lack of cooperation with the dev community, despite their continued promises. It seems to be that even though the company was falling out of grace with devs, they are beginning to try and renew their efforts by showing signs that they are still trying to get us on their side.

Well, HTC, you have made the right choice. Developers may only represent a small chunk of your overall user base, but you must understand that we (devs, hobbyists, and enthusiasts) tend to have very large spheres of influence. And in this very technological world of ours, it is a very important thing to have influential, indirect sales people, boasting the glory and overall awesomeness of your products. So, while our numbers may be small on a first impression, we are legion! It is this writer’s sincere hope that during your internal discussions to release these docs, the idea and concept of better, faster support for the developer scene was a factor being discussed, because this could easily sway a LOT of people over the manufacturer fence once again.

Once again, this is a great day for renewd relationships, particularly between developers and HTC. Keep up the good work, guys. We’ve missed you!

You can find the original petition in this thread and the sources by going over to HTCDev.

Want something published in the Portal? Contact any News Writer.

[Thanks Jeff for the tip and the great news!]

Note from the author: The article has been corrected to reflect the original author of the petition.

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TWRP

The last time we brought you news about TWRP, it was to announce that TWRP 2.2.2 had been released. It had fixed a lot of bugs from the initial release of TWRP 2.2 and added a few new features. Very recently, TWRP has been updated again to version 2.3.

There were a whole bunch of awesome improvements with TWRP 2.2 and a lot of unique and brand new features as well. TWRP 2.3 promises no less. The official change log includes:

Rebased onto AOSP Jelly Bean source code
Rewrote backup, restore, wipe, and mount code in C++ classes for easier maintenance going forward
NOTE: backups from prior versions of TWRP are still compatible with 2.3
ADB sideload functionality from AOSP is included in 2.3, see this link for more info
Re-wrote fix permissions entirely in C++ and runs in a few seconds instead of a few minutes (thanks to bigbiff)
Improvements to zip finding in OpenRecoveryScript (should be a lot fewer GooManager automation issues)
Faster boot times
Added charging indicator while in recovery (only updates once every 60 seconds)

Additionally, XDA Recognized Developer Dees_Troy has reported that there is now support for spaces in backup names. Before, if you added a space to the name of a backup, it would not restore. Now users can use whatever naming convention they want.

One of the biggest changes, though, is all of the TWRP being rewritten in C++ and its move to recovery API 3 instead of API 2. With the code rewrite, it will allow TWRP to update more quickly and with more stability. With the API 3 change, it means that some flashable zip files may stop working because the developer needs to update the update-binary. If you don’t want to wait for the developer, or the developer has ceased working on the project, you can find one to use on TWRP’s official website. To install the latest TWRP, you can use the Goomanager application. Simply open the application, hit menu, and install open recovery.

If you want to check out the latest TWRP recovery for your device, check one of the links below.

Source Code

Previously, we brought you news that HTC Amaze 4G owners wanted their TI WLAN source code and had started a petition for it using emails and social media to get HTC to release it. HTC hasn’t yet released the TI WLAN source code, but they have released the ICS kernel source for the Telus Amaze 4G. This is still fantastic news for HTC Amaze 4G owners, as development—which was on hold for so long due to not having source—can now finally get underway.

Now that source is released, the developers who commonly work with it have come together to tear it down and figure out what’s there and what isn’t. XDA Recognized Developers hasoon2000 and sportsstar89, along with XDA Senior Member oryan_dunn and a few others, have taken a good look at the source code and have concluded a decent number of things and have identified some issues.

Of course, the biggest issue is that the source code they’ve been petitioning for wasn’t actually released. The aforementioned developers have determined that not only were the TI WLAN drivers not included, but what little source code related to it was included was commented out. This has flustered the developers, but they are already working on ways to get around not having the source they requested.

To learn more, check out the discussion thread and source code thread.

Bootloader Customizer

Not too long ago, we brought you news that allowed HTC EVO 4G LTE users to customize their bootloaders. The process was pretty cool, allowing users to make their bootloader look however they want—including making it look unhacked. After the initial project was released, users clamored for this to be made available to more devices. The requests were heard and responded to. Now, the plugin has been made available to make the bootloader customizer for a number of HTC devices.

The process for a developer to port this is not hard. XDA Recognized Contributor regaw_leinad, who developed the application and plugin, takes a time out from the stags (yes, that’s really him) to explain how:

it’s basically all written, they just need to fill in the values for their hboot, and embed the hboot.img into the exe. I already have a placeholder for the hboot.img and android-info.txt so a drag and drop over them should keep it embedded.

Regaw_leinad is also creating the application for the supported devices, but wanted to release the plugin first so users had a chance to get it sooner. The current list of supported HTC devices include:

  • HTC EVO 4G LTE
  • HTC EVO 3D
  • HTC EVO 4G
  • HTC Sensation
  • HTC Wildfire S
  • HTC Incredible S
  • Droid Incredible 2
  • HTC Amaze 4G
  • HTC One X
  • HTC One S
  • HTC One V
  • HTC One XL
  • HTC Thunderbolt
  • HTC Desire HD
  • HTC Inspire 4G
  • HTC EVO Shift 4G
  • HTC Desire S
  • HTC Tattoo
  • Droid Eris
  • HTC Desire
  • HTC Incredible
  • HTC Wildfire
  • HTC Aria
  • HTC Desire Z
  • HTC EVO 4G+
  • HTC Vivid 4G
  • HTC EVO Design 4G
  • HTC Sensation XE
  • HTC Rezound
  • HTC Desire C

While the list is quite large, one must keep in mind that not all of these devices have S-Off, and users must have S-Off in order to actually use this application. To get started, visit the original thread.

Jelly Bean Sensation

The march of Jelly Bean 2012 is in full swing. In the last week, we brought you Jelly Bean-related news on such devices as the ASUS Transformer TF300T, the Acer Iconia A100 and A500, and an XDA Developer TV roundup. The pace is truly awesome. The latest devices to the latest and greatest version of Android are a couple of T-Mobile HTC devices—the HTC Sensation and the HTC Amaze 4G.

XDA Forum Member sahil_lombar with the help of others, brings Jelly Bean AOSP to the Sensation. HTC Amaze users get the goods thanks to XDA Recognized Developer sportsstar89, who actually brought AOSP in the form of CyanogenMod 10. Both ROMs are alpha releases, which means there’s a pretty decent list of things working and not working. For now, things not working on the Sensation include:

Radio
Wifi
Audio
Google Now
Camera
Light Sensors
Button and Notification lights
and many other things

And for the HTC Amaze:

* Wi-Fi (Got borked again)
* GPS
* GSM
* Camera

The developers for both ROMs are working to get the issues resolved, so users only need to have patience until the work is completed. While both ROMs are stable enough to play with, neither one is ready to be used a daily driver just yet. Until then, though, sit back and enjoy the development.

For full feature lists and more details, users can either head to the HTC Sensation JB thread or the HTC Amaze 4G JB thread.

filemanagerrenam

Just about three months ago, we brought you news that the Team Win Recovery Project had received a massive update to version 2.1. April’s release largely heralded the start of a new age in recoveries—where one would no longer have to deal with cumbersome menus, instead interacting with a very user-friendly GUI.

It wasn’t simply about the GUI either. In addition to bringing an unrivaled level of UI polish, TWRP 2.1 offered users many advanced features such as update.zip queuing, a basic file manager, and dual storage support for Nandroid backups. Additionally, TWRP added support for the open source scripting engine OpenRecoveryScript, which works in conjunction with the previously covered GooManager.

How do you follow up something as revolutionary as TWRP 2.1? With TWRP 2.2, of course. That’s how! The new release builds on the previous offering by delivering many recovery “firsts.” For starters, this is the first recovery to feature on on-screen keyboard. Why would you want such a thing? How about naming and renaming Nandroid backups! TWRP 2.2 is also the only recovery to split extremely large backups, allowing users to backup and restore /data partitions larger than the 2 GB FAT32 file size limit.

In the words of XDA Recognized Developer Dees_Troy:

- On-screen keyboard in recovery! — supports long press, backspace repeat, and swipe left deletes everything left of the cursor
- Name new backups and rename existing backups
- Rename files and folders in the file manager
- Pseudo-terminal emulator
- Support decrypting an encrypted data partition on Galaxy Nexus (enter password using keyboard)
- Backup archive splitting — allows backup and restore of data partitions larger than 2GB
- Simplified XML layout support between resolutions
- Added dual storage selection radio buttons to zip install, backup, and restore pages
- Improved zip install compatibility
- Updated update-binary source code
- Numerous small bug fixes and improvements

Eager to get started? I know I am. Head to the links below to obtain the appropriate version for your device:

CID

Compiling a ROM from source—or compiling anything from source—is often considered the first real development that aspiring developers do. There are ROM kitchens out there that will compile source for you, but the experience of doing it on your own is simply more gratifying. While the tutorial is written in the HTC Amaze 4G section of the forums, the instructions are pretty basic and should work for many other devices.

The tutorial, written by XDA Recognized Developer sportsstar89, was created to help generate interest in building ROMs from source and to help inspire more ideas. Of course, when it comes to AOSP development in general, the more the merrier.

Those intending on following the tutorial will need to have Linux installed on their computers to start. From there, users are given a step-by-step guide on gather source from the repositories and compiling it on their computers. There are some peculiarities that users need to pay attention to. For instance, there is a command where users need to input how many CPU cores their device has. So it is recommended that users read the instructions carefully so all the parameters are entered correctly.

For the full tutorial, check out the original thread.

HTC Amaze 4G

Sometimes OEMs need a swift kick to remind them that things need to be done. Such instances include the worldwide outcry for unlocked bootloaders and the HTC One X hardware fault. While HTC may not always listen to their customers, when it really matters they have a history of stepping up.

This is a problem that HTC Amaze 4G owners are looking to avoid. XDA Recognized Developer hasoon2000, who’s responsible for many popular toolkits and easier S-Off methods is stepping up to help get the source code released. As he wrote in his email to HTC:

HTC has made a promise to help to development community by releasing the source code as well as unlocking the bootloader for their devices. However, the TI WLAN source code has been withheld from the community. This slows development and can even cease development for the device completely. Without the source code, developers will have to develop blindly and hoping not to break anything in the process. The Amaze 4G has great potential due to his hardware and power that it harnesses. Android is an Open Source OS, but HTC is sounding more like Apple, holding their source from the public. People purchased the device to experience the “Real Feel” of Android by customizing it, installing Custom ROMs, tweaking it, etc. Without the WLAN source code, we, as a community, have starting to lose faith in HTC and some of us have even pledged to never purchase an HTC device again due to HTC’s policies. The community will like for HTC to rethink their strategy and be “Open” with the community. The best form of advertisement is by “The Word-of-Mouth”. When our community, the tech savvy and the owners of a smartphone, see how HTC listens to their customers requests, they will become more profitable and retain/gain new and loyal customers.

Concerned users can send HTC emails and tweets showing their desire for WLAN source code release. Hasoon2000 is assisting users with how to write a proper email—to decrease senseless, inflammatory and vulgar statements—and where to send them. Twitter users are encouraged to use the #ForTheCustomer hashtag. Using these tools, Hasoon2000 and other HTC Amaze 4G owners are hoping that HTC gets the point and aids the community expediently.

For the full discussion, head to the petition thread.

Soff Tool Kit

Not too long ago, we brought you news of an all in one tool kit for a variety of devices that delivered permanent root, unlocked the bootloader, installed a custom recovery, and batched installed apk files. There was, however, one thing missing—S-Off. At the time of its release, S-Off was still a dream for many of these devices, but it has since become a reality. HTC Amaze 4G, Vivid, Rezound and MyTouch 4G Slide owners can now enjoy S-Off easily thanks to a new tool kit.

XDA Recognized Developer hasoon2000 has released another decent sized batch of tool kits for HTC devices with the sole purpose of obtaining S-Off easily on the aforementioned HTC devices. Of course, from there you can use the all-in-one tool kits for just about anything else. The tool kits are easy to use. Users simply open up the interface, and are given all the tools needed to make a successful hack. The features include:

- Links to a video and instructions to prepare you to S-Off your device
- HTC Drivers
- Command to flash an HBOOT of your choosing (Be sure you know what you are doing!)
- Command to flash a Recovery of your choosing
- Links

Of course, this is all based on the brilliance that is Juopunutbear, and all proper credit is given. Head over to the appropriate thread to get started:

Ice-Cream-Sandwich-Recipe

One of the most common questions here at XDA over the past several months has been, “When will my HTC device receive Ice Cream Sandwich?” Now, thanks to a tip from XDA Senior Member neoofoox we have our answer.

Although we previously mentioned the devices confirmed to get ICS from HTC’s blog back in March, it was only recently that HTC finally confirmed their timeline for this year’s releases. According to HTC:

What is the overall timeline of Android 4.0 updates?
The majority of devices will receive upgrades in June and July 2012 and we expect to finish upgrades in August 2012 for all announced devices.

When will my device get the Android 4.0 upgrade?

The target timeline for announced devices is below. Because of partner and network testing, and approval processes for device updates, it can take up to 45 days for all carriers and countries to get the update after a rollout has begun.

Device

Schedule

DROID Incredible 2 by HTC To be determined (by the end of August)
HTC Amaze 4G May-June
HTC Desire S June-July
HTC Desire HD July-August
HTC EVO 3D June-July
HTC EVO 4G+ May-June
HTC EVO Design 4G June-July
HTC Incredible S June-July
HTC Sensation March-June
HTC Sensation 4G March-June
HTC Sensation XE March-June
HTC Sensation XL April-Jun
HTC Rezound June-July
HTC Rhyme June-July
HTC Thunderbolt July-August
HTC Velocity 4G March-June
HTC Vivid March-June

Please note these dates are targets and may shift due to testing and approvals.

For a detailed look at when your specific device will be getting a taste of frosty Android goodness and several other questions answered, head on over the official page and salivate over your upcoming good fortune.

amaze4

Looks like Sense 4.0 keeps going down the 2011 line of devices, filling these devices with new life and a sense of continuity thanks to the wonderful work of some of our developers. The latest case took place earlier on Sunday as XDA Recognized Developer sportsstar89 and his colleagues at Team Nightmare felt confident enough on their work to release it into the wild, granting the Amaze 4G users the option of adding yet another port to their arsenal of ROMs and options.

The ROM in question, much like with other early Sense 4 releases, has very few working features and most of them are nowhere near enough to be considered daily drivers—at least for the early ports that we have covered in their alpha states. Although it still has a long way to go, the devs got this to boot, and there are a few other things working such as Bluetooth, which hardly ever works right off the bat, as well as the touchscreen. However, nothing else seems to work properly at  the moment.

Keep in mind, once again, that this is by no means a finished build. So, please share what you can find in terms of bugs with the devs so that the build can be improved and the quest for Sense 4.0 can be fulfilled.

Working:

  • As of now not much
    Boots
    Touchscreen
    Bluetooth (Strange Enough)

You can find more information in the port thread.

Want something published in the Portal? Contact any News Writer.

[Thanks sportsstar89 and dharvey4651 for the tip!]

HTC Unbricking Project

For owners of many HTC device such as the HTC Amaze 4G, EVO 3D, MyTouch 4G Slide, Sensation, and the Vivid/Raider/Velocity, this has been a long time coming. A fully functional method to restore a device from a full brick is a pretty big deal. This then gives users more confidence when performing potentially risky tasks such as HBoot updates, ROM flashes, or turning S On.

XDA Senior Member dexter93, along with a host of other developers, has finally released this project after several months of beta testing and waiting. This is great news for many HTC users who have bricked devices under certain circumstances, and is much better news for users who unintentionally—or even intentionally—brick theirs in the future.

The method is pretty complicated and requires a number of things on the user side. The method also requires the use of a Linux-based computer and the most up to date RUU for your device. Finally, the most important thing, according to dexter93 is as folllows:

a device bricked by writing security flag 3 with an unsigned hboot, or caused by a damaged hboot via interrupted OTA update/RUU flash on a S-ON device

In other words, this will not work for all kinds of bricks. Rather it will only work for devices bricked by setting S On with an unsigned HBoot or if your HBoot was somehow damaged. While this unfortunately doesn’t help those who may have bricked their devices through other means, it will undoubtedly help many previously helpless users. It should be mentioned, though, that dexter93 and crew are looking to find way to fix other bricks as well.

For all of the information—and there’s quite a bit—as well as download links, screen shots, the full instructions, and discussion, head on over to the appropriate thread to get unbricked:

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