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Posts Tagged: HTC Droid DNA

dna442

You may remember that just recently the HTC Droid DNA gained the ability to dual multiple ROMs thanks to an unofficial MultiROM port. So for the folks who’ve been wondering how this may be of benefit, there’s now a Sense 5.5-laced build of Android 4.4.2 that’s been ported over from the HTC One to the Droid DNA that may serve as a fine starting point.

Not possible without the efforts of XDA Recognized Developers sbryan12144 and Zarboz as well as newtoroot, joelz9614, and Hawknest; the Android 4.4.2 and Sense 5.5 ports are currently stable and running on the Linux 3.4.18 kernel. As these have been ported from the HTC One, one will expect all the software features from the One to be present in this port. The ROM does not come pre-rooted, but this shouldn’t be a problem because you can simply root it after installation. The port offers both CDMA and GSM device support, and there are three downloads provided: an odexed build, a deodexed build, and a patch to get CDMA working.

Droid DNA users interested in getting a previes of the Android 4.4.2 and Sense 5.5 experience should head over to the original thread for more information. It’s better than waiting.

droiddna

It seems like XDA Recognized Developer Tassadar‘s MultiROM seems to be quite the popular method for different devices to boot multiple ROMs nowadays, considering that MultiROM was originally developed for only the Nexus 7 and has since been ported over to a number of other phones such as the Sony Xperia M and the Optimus One. And the community doesn’t look like stopping any time soon, as the HTC Droid DNA, a.k.a. HTC Butterfly, has recently received an unofficial MultiROM port.

This comes thanks to the efforts of XDA Senior Member jamiethemorris, making it possible for users of the Droid DNA to run multiple ROMs (not at the same time of course) without the hassle other devices must go through. The installation process comes in three parts:

  1. flashing the provided MultiROM zip through a custom recovery
  2. flash the provided modified recovery through fastboot or with Flashify
  3. install a kernel with the kexec-hardboot patch (currently only supports two kernels with more to be added in the future)

Installation will not wipe or affect the sole, primary ROM you’re using right now. Additionally, you can run ROMs installed on a USB drive, which has to be connected to the phone with an OTG cable. To boot another ROM, you simply choose from those installed on your device or a USB drive from a menu at startup, and you’re good to go.

So if you’re interested in booting multiple roms on your Droid DNA, or would like to find out more, check out the original thread for more information.

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Capture

Just yesterday, we mentioned how the  was starting to receive its Android 4.2.2 update in the form of a 2-part OTA. While official OEM-provided Android updates are always welcome, they often also come with the unwanted side effect of closing off previous root methods.

Luckily, when one door is closed, another often opens—and this new door comes in the form of a new S-off method for devices running software version 3. XDA Recognized Developer beaups managed to bring his Rumrunner S-off method to the device. As described by the developer:

 software version 1.xx – use facepalm
software version 2.xx – use moonshine (2.06 version of moonshine DOES work with 2.07 devices)
software version 3.xx – use rumrunner

If you have a recently updated device and you want to get the S-off goods, make your way over to the original thread to get started.

[Many thanks to XDA Forum Member Skokielad for the heads up!]

htc-droid-dna-black-en-slide-01

HTC has been quite good about releasing expedient Android system updates as of late. To that end, we’ve recently seen Android 4.4 KitKat updates for both the HTC One Google Play edition, as well as the developer and unlocked version of the OEM-skinned model. Now, the company has shared its KitKat update plans for the HTC Droid DNA.

Close cousin to the HTC J Butterfly, the Droid DNA is HTC’s former flagship a few generations ago, and the first mass market phone available in the US with a 1080p display.  And released a little over a year ago, there’s no reason why the the still powerful device should not get to enjoy KitKat in official capacity. Thankfully, HTC has stated that the DNA will receive KitKat by the end of Q1 2014.

And in more immediate news, Verizon and HTC are now updating the device to Android 4.2.2. The update, which comes in the form of two sequential OTAs (2.08.605.1 710RD and 3.06.605.4) also brings along HTC Sense 5 and various bugfixes. And for those looking to install a pre-rooted version, XDA Senior Member santod040 has you covered.

It’s good to see that despite delays with the Android 4.3 update, KitKat will come to the DNA in the relatively near future. Share your thoughts in the comments below, and don’t forget to make your way over to the HTC Droid DNA forums as well.

[Source: Verizon, HTCHTCSource | Via AndroidPolice, AndroidandMe]

HTC-ProductDetail-Hero-slide-04

Yesterday, Motorola shared some insight into its Android 4.4 KitKat upgrade plans. They added some devices to the update list, and they even began the KitKat rollout to the Verizon variant of their flagship Moto X. Today, HTC has followed suit by elucidating on their update plans.

Not too long ago, HTC publicly stated that they had already delivered the KitKat code for the HTC One Google Play edition to Google. While the update is still yet to be seen, we can only assume that it will make its way to users quite soon. Unfortunately, the same cannot be said for the standard version of the HTC One. However, HTC’s Jason Makenzie had previously stated the company’s plans on updating all North American carrier variants within 90 days of KitKat’s October 31st release.

Now, HTC has set a firm date on its update plans for both the carrier-branded variants of the HTC One and the Droid DNA. According to HTC’s Twitter page, the One will see official KitKat love by the end of January, and the DNA will receive the goods by the end of Q1 2014. But after the One’s delayed update to Android 4.3, let’s just hope this doesn’t become another HTC Thunderbolt situation.

Are you happy with HTC’s proposed timetable? Let us know in the comments section below.

[Source: HTC Twitter (1, 23)

ddb

ddbOne of our goals for the year has been to better organize all of the development works (ROMs, apps, tools, kernels, etc.) on XDA. We wanted this to be useful but also to have minimal impact on how developers post to XDA and on users who are happy with the current structure of the forums.

We’re currently testing a system, we call the Development Database (or DevDB for short) on a handful of forums (Galaxy S IIXperia Z, Galaxy Note II, Droid DNA, Nexus 4, Nexus 7). You’ll note that when you go to the gateway to those forums, such as that for the Xperia Z, you can now see a tab for ROMs. Each ROM is linked to a forum thread– just as it’s always been. But when you click through to these threads, you’ll notice that they’ve become “enhanced” with a shiny new menu bar as shown in the below screenshot. Developers have the option of which features they want to include for each project:

- Feature Requester
- Bug Reporter
- Screenshots
- Downloads (via our own torrent tracker)
- Q&A Thread Linking
- Reviews

READ ON »

xda-cruzerlite

DSC_0074A while back, we took a poll on which handset we should add to the list of XDA merchandise. After a few months of discussion, and honestly just having a lot going on, we’re ready to announce the winning selections for addition to our XDA case lineup with CruzerLite. READ ON »

htc

OK. It’s no big secret. The HTC One is a great and exciting device. You’ve heard us talk about it—everything from the launch event and preliminary benchmarks to giving the device and its carrier variants a place on our forums. Now, we have kernel source for some One variants, which is great news for those looking to start development work for HTC’s latest flagship. And since the device was only recently launched, with many carrier variants still pending release, HTC has done a great job of keeping to their GPL requirements.

In addition to the One, HTC also saw fit to release update kernel source for the Droid DNA to match an OTA that was released back in early February. In other words, the company is now GPL compliant with binaries released two months ago. The DNA, if you may recall, was released quite some time ago. Available since November of last year, it took nearly five months for the device to become GPL compliant. Better late than never, but we can’t help but think how much further along the development community would be for the device, had the GPL obligations been fulfilled earlier. In fact, we’ve even seen better from certain relatively obscure manufacturers.

Let’s just hope that in the future, the One that we’re waiting for isn’t an HTC device’s (up-to-date) kernel source code. Those looking to get in on the goods can find them in the links below.

Source: Official HTC Twitter, HTCdev

Update: As pointed out by reader and “HTC Champion” Leigh, my previous statements were somewhat mistaken. Article text has been updated accordingly.

Device Review: HTC Droid DNA

March 30, 2013   By:

IMG_3985

FIRST!1!!1!!!one!eleventy!!
– A commonly found YouTube comment

Once every generation or so, a device gets to make this same proclamation: first to get a new processor, first to get more RAM, first to get a better camera. This generation, one of the key features appears to be screen resolution and, at least in North America, the HTC Droid DNA claims the prize of “first” device with a 1080p display.

Of course, the Droid DNA is not just another pretty face. It packs a definite punch with its quad-core processor and heaps of RAM, and though those things have become quite commonplace among the bevy of new devices on the market, the DNA is still a formidable device. But is it a device for a developer? Let’s find out…


Video Courtesy of Twildottv

Hardware

The Droid DNA comes with the following specs on Verizon Wireless:

  • 1.5GHz quad core Qualcomm® Snapdragon™ S4 Pro processor
  • 2GB of DDR2 RAM
  • 5” 1080P Super LCD3 Corning® Gorilla® Glass 2
  • 2020mAh Standard Li–Ion; non–removable
  • 16GB internal storage
  • 8MP Auto Focus Rear–Facing camera with Single–LED Flash + HTC ImageChip
  • 2.1MP 88°ultra-wide-angle front-facing with improved low light performance

So yes, for all intents and purposes, it is an extremely powerful and well-built device.

In terms of actual usability, the hardware is amazing. Everything I threw at it just worked, no questions asked. Battery life was exceptional, lasting days and days on a single charge with extremely light usage, and more than a single day with heavier usage.

Screenshot_2013-03-18-16-31-34

The camera, if it matters to you, is still very much a traditional cell phone camera. With enough light, it can produce some decent images, but as soon as the light dims, you get a lot of grain and motion blur. Some samples are provided in the video above.

Software

The Droid DNA originally came out running Android version 4.1.1 Jelly Bean, with HTC Sense 4.0+. What’s the “+” for? I can only assume more Sense. It’s not the latest, greatest version of Sense available, but it was at the time of release. If Sense is something you enjoy, consider this device your cup of tea. Otherwise, you can always load up another launcher or root the device and replace any and/or all of it. Ahh, the beauty of Android.

Additionally, since it’s running Jelly Bean, you get the increased performance of the UI from Project Butter, but since it’s 4.1.1, you don’t have the added features from 4.2+ such as multiple user accounts, but depending on your point of view that might not be such a bad thing.

For Developers

Approximately 9 days after the release of the Droid DNA, HTC dropped the kernel source and binaries to HTCDev.com. The device was quickly rooted, S-Off unlocked, and tons of custom ROMs and mods were created by the community.

However, for some reason, none of the larger projects seem to have added the DNA to their official lineups. There are quite a few CyanogenMod-based ROMs for the DNA and even a work-in-progress Ubuntu port for it, but nothing official.

Odd? Perhaps.

Maybe it’s a lack of device adoption, or perhaps there’s something missing from the available sources from HTC. I’m not an Android developer, so it’s not my place to pass judgement on it.

In Conclusion

Overall, from a consumer point of view, this is an extremely powerful, well-designed device with amazing battery life. It is very slim, lightweight, and no matter what you throw at it, odds are that it will perform admirably.

From a development point of view, there’s a ton of activity in the official forum here on XDA for the Droid DNA, but not so much from any “official,” larger projects.

At a $199 price point on-contract or $599 off-contract, it’s definitely an attractive device, but that decision is best left up to you and your preference. If you’re in the market for a Verizon device, head on down to your local store and try to lay your hands on this one and see how it fits you.

Check out Jordan’s YouTube Channel and Jordan’s Gaming YouTube Channel

DNASoff

One of the biggest possible hacks for most current Android devices is the ability to completely remove security flags from the bootloader. Most companies these days will give you some way to unlock your device’s bootloaders, but many are simply partial unlocks, while others are entirely not unlockable. HTC is one such company that offers what is known as a “developer unlock” through the htcdev service. However, as stated already this is but a partial unlock, which allows you to do a few fun things like flashing custom recoveries and using them to flash new ROMs. This is good, but it is quite limited, and you must have access to a PC to use fastboot commands in order to do more. This is normally overcome by disabling the HBOOT security flags, which is not an easy task. Every time HTC releases a new HBOOT, it comes loaded with patches to try and keep people from achieving a complete unlock (S-OFF). If you have either an One S, One XL, and Droid DNA your luck has just changed, courtesy of XDA Recognized Developers beaups and XDA Elite Recognized Developer jcase.

The process involves flashing a file through fastboot, which essentially removes eMMC write protection. After that, a second file is pushed into /data/local/temp, which removes all the S-OFF flags on the device. The only real requirement to perform this procedure (aside from having a PC with adb and fastboot) is that you are SuperCID. The latter (which stands for Super Country ID  in case you are not familiar) is a protection to prevent you from flashing a RUU meant for a different region. This is a protection that has been around since the days of the HTC Wizard, and it is still present to this day. The flashing of the original zip requires you to have SuperCID off (rooting and custom recovery are not required for this to work). Luckily, this has already been achieved for all three devices, but it seems to have been blocked yet again after a recent OTA update. So, if you have not SuperCID’ed your device yet, do not attempt to do this! Having said that, stay tuned; a fix is on its way.

Please read the procedure carefully and thoroughly. Achieving S-OFF does involve some risk, and as such, there is a chance of bricking. That being said, rewards await you once the device is fully S-OFF, so make haste! Oh and just as your momma told you… don’t accept candies from strangers or OTAs from manufacturers. Have fun and happy unlocking!

Welcome to Facepalm S-Off for modern HTC phones

You can visit the original threads in the One S, One XL, and DNA sections for more information.

Want something published in the Portal? Contact any News Writer

[Thanks xHausx and E.Cadro for the tip!]

Vote_for_Design

At the end of last year, we started selling XDA cases with our friends at CruzerLite, and we’ve seen some phenomenal interest. Our current lineup is the Samsung Galaxy Note 2, Samsung Galaxy S III, Samsung Galaxy Nexus, and the Google Nexus 4—but we want to add more. So we have decided to hold a poll and let the users choose which device(s) to add to our current lineup.

Below you will find some of the top devices at XDA. Please choose one from the list that you would like to see offered, and we will pick from the top 3 devices. The voting ends on February 15, so make sure you place your vote for the devices you love!

EDIT: The results are in, and displayed below. We’ll keep you updated as to the final options when they become available.

Next_XDA_Case_Results

FlashImageGUI

For those who are unfamiliar, Flash Image GUI has been around for quite some time. The tool allows users to flash kernels and recoveries with a nice GUI, and all of this is done without requiring them to first reboot into recovery. While recoveries have gotten remarkably friendly over the last couple of years, some would still prefer to stay in the comfort of their favorite mobile OS for the duration of the flash. Now, this tool has added support for the HTC Droid DNA.

XDA Recognized Developer joeykrim, a longtime developer for the project, released the app for the DNA. Judging from user response, it seems to work as well as ever. Here’s the official app description:

flash_image (bmlwrite) is an extremely useful utility for flashing custom kernels, boot logos (so far ONLY Samsung devices) and recoveries. This binary has made it possible to easily flash all these items and is used almost everywhere behind the scenes (i.e. in custom recoveries, packaged into kernel /sbin, etc).

Custom Recovery
Supports both CWM and TWRP recovery image flashing!

Users simply need to install the APK file like any other app. From there, you open the app, select which kernel or recovery you want to flash, and the app takes care of the rest. It should be noted that there are potentially major inherent risks. Users shouldn’t flash AOSP kernels over Sense-based ROMs, or vice versa. Moreover, those who accidentally flash a bad zip with this tool and don’t have a custom recovery could be in a sticky situation. That’s why you should go ahead and make sure you have (a very good) one before proceeding.

At minimum, devices will have to be HTCDev unlocked in order for this app to function properly. While the app itself is easy to use, it should also be noted that it’s flashing some pretty important software so there is a chance bad things can happen. Be sure to have a Nandroid backup handy at all times and follow instructions to help minimize the potential risk.

For download links and more info, check out the Flash Image GUI thread.

htc-droid-dna-j-butterfly-0

In case you haven’t heard, the HTC Droid DNA was unlocked despite Verizon’s best efforts. The method involved re-writing the CID to fool HTCDev into thinking it was a different phone. While effective, the developers involved thought they could do better. And so they did. Now there is a new way to get the HTC Droid DNA unlocked.

XDA Elite Recognized Developer jcase, who released the first exploit, also created the second. This one is different in a variety of ways, although the execution is very similar. Instead of writing a new CID for the device, jcase’s newest method rewrites the whole partition.

It’s just as involved as the last one, and involves many of the same processes. For instance, users who want to use this exploit will have to work out of two command prompt windows, instead of just one. It is also worth noting that this process still doesn’t actually unlock the HTC Droid DNA. It simply prepares it so that it can be unlocked through conventional channels like HTCDev. However, when it comes to unlocking a device, the more ways, the better.

For more details, check out the original thread.

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