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Posts Tagged: HTC Droid DNA

FlashImageGUI

For those who are unfamiliar, Flash Image GUI has been around for quite some time. The tool allows users to flash kernels and recoveries with a nice GUI, and all of this is done without requiring them to first reboot into recovery. While recoveries have gotten remarkably friendly over the last couple of years, some would still prefer to stay in the comfort of their favorite mobile OS for the duration of the flash. Now, this tool has added support for the HTC Droid DNA.

XDA Recognized Developer joeykrim, a longtime developer for the project, released the app for the DNA. Judging from user response, it seems to work as well as ever. Here’s the official app description:

flash_image (bmlwrite) is an extremely useful utility for flashing custom kernels, boot logos (so far ONLY Samsung devices) and recoveries. This binary has made it possible to easily flash all these items and is used almost everywhere behind the scenes (i.e. in custom recoveries, packaged into kernel /sbin, etc).

Custom Recovery
Supports both CWM and TWRP recovery image flashing!

Users simply need to install the APK file like any other app. From there, you open the app, select which kernel or recovery you want to flash, and the app takes care of the rest. It should be noted that there are potentially major inherent risks. Users shouldn’t flash AOSP kernels over Sense-based ROMs, or vice versa. Moreover, those who accidentally flash a bad zip with this tool and don’t have a custom recovery could be in a sticky situation. That’s why you should go ahead and make sure you have (a very good) one before proceeding.

At minimum, devices will have to be HTCDev unlocked in order for this app to function properly. While the app itself is easy to use, it should also be noted that it’s flashing some pretty important software so there is a chance bad things can happen. Be sure to have a Nandroid backup handy at all times and follow instructions to help minimize the potential risk.

For download links and more info, check out the Flash Image GUI thread.

htc-droid-dna-j-butterfly-0

In case you haven’t heard, the HTC Droid DNA was unlocked despite Verizon’s best efforts. The method involved re-writing the CID to fool HTCDev into thinking it was a different phone. While effective, the developers involved thought they could do better. And so they did. Now there is a new way to get the HTC Droid DNA unlocked.

XDA Elite Recognized Developer jcase, who released the first exploit, also created the second. This one is different in a variety of ways, although the execution is very similar. Instead of writing a new CID for the device, jcase’s newest method rewrites the whole partition.

It’s just as involved as the last one, and involves many of the same processes. For instance, users who want to use this exploit will have to work out of two command prompt windows, instead of just one. It is also worth noting that this process still doesn’t actually unlock the HTC Droid DNA. It simply prepares it so that it can be unlocked through conventional channels like HTCDev. However, when it comes to unlocking a device, the more ways, the better.

For more details, check out the original thread.

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HTC Droid DNA All-in-One Toolkit

Who doesn’t love all-in-one toolkits here? They make the whole process of unlocking, rooting, and flashing a custom recovery on our Android devices so easy, even a novice can do it. No more manual commands, no more searching for drivers, no more reading through multiple guides—just load up the toolkit, follow its steps, and you’ve got a phone ready to take to the next level.

If you’re an HTC Droid DNA owner looking into unlocking the bootloader of your device, rooting it, and flashing ClockworkMod or TWRP recovery, there’s now an all-in-one toolkit available to let you do all of that with ease.

Developed by XDA Recognized Developer hasoon2000, this GUI-based toolkit is a must-have for every Droid DNA owner looking to tweak and customize further. Apart from the features mentioned above, it also lets you flash kernels, boot your device into bootloader or recovery, relock the bootloader once unlocked, fix the Mainver error, directly sideload APKs from your PC, and backup your data to a PC.

To get started, head over to the forum thread where you can find the detailed instructions and more information.

bootloader unlock

In case you haven’t heard, Verizon is at it again. So far this year, developers have had to tackle the locked bootloader on the Galaxy S III and Verizon stopping HTCDev from unlocking the HTC Incredible 4G LTE. The largest carrier in the US still hasn’t learned yet, as they shut down HTCDev from working on the HTC Droid DNA. Or at least they think they did.

XDA Elite Recgonized Developer jcase has posted a method to get the bootloader unlocked, despite HTCDev not supporting it. Also involved in the process is XDA Recognized Developer dsb9938. The method itself doesn’t unlock your bootloader, but it will make your bootloader unlockable.

The method is actually an exploit that allows users to use HTCDev as normal. You’ll need ADB to get it done. Essentially what users will be doing is restoring a modified backup and implanting a generated CIDBLOCK.IMG. This allows your phone to be unlocked via HTCDev the regular way. It is a little complicated, so be sure to follow the instructions to the letter. The method does have the potential to brick your phone if done improperly.

For the full instructions, go to the original thread. For the time being, until jcase can get the instructions put in the thread, you’ll be following the directions jcase wrote on Android Police.

HTC-Droid-DNA-phone

Not too long ago, we brought you a root guide for HTC’s latest 440 ppi flagship device, the Droid DNA. Now, we are happy to report that there is also an insecure boot kernel for the device.

XDA Recognized Developer dsb9938 has released an insecure boot kernel for the HTC Droid DNA. For those who have never used one, such a kernel allows you to have root access when accessing your phone via ADB. As explained by dsb9938 himself:

This is simply modified to allow root in adb connections.

You must unlock on the HTCDev site first.

Then unzip and flash the file using fastboot (fastboot flash boot unsecure.DNA.stock.boot.img)

Then reboot, and when you adb in you are root.

While the most common use of an insecure boot is to obtain root access to the device, and that was indeed the impetus behind this release, they can still come in handy for device modification performed directly from your computer via ADB.

For more details, check out the original thread.

Update: Since HTC withdrew the unlock for the DNA, this method no longer works.

xdalogo

Recently, we added forums for various new devices. First up is the HTC Droid DNA. HTC’s late 2012 flagship packs powerful specs, a remarkably high resolution screen, and sleek curves to make any gadget lover drool. Starting with the screen, the Droid DNA (and its Japanese cousin, the J Butterfly) packs the first 1080p mobile phone display. Given the 5-inch display size, this comes out to a remarkable 440 ppi. Not just pretty to look at, the Droid DNA also packs a punch thanks to its 1.5 GHz quad-core Snapdragon S4 Pro, LTE connectivity, and 2020 mAh battery.

Next, we have the Samsung Galaxy Camera. While not a phone, the Samsung Galaxy Camera is an interesting combination of a high-resolution 16 MP pocket camera and a fully functional Android-powered mobile device. On the Android side, it’s powered by a quad-core Samsung Exynos 4412 running at 1.4 GHz. It has a 4.8″ SC-LCD screen, packing a resolution of 1280×720. It comes with a full gig of RAM, and weighs in at a hefty 305 grams. On the camera side, the Galaxy Camera features a 16 MP BSI CMOS sensor. It also features a 28-48 mm (35mm equivalent) optical zoom lens.

Next up are the Desire C and Desire V. Both devices feature single-core Qualcomm Snapdragon S1 processors, half a gig of RAM, and 4 gigs of internal storage. The Desire V’s processor clocks in at 1 GHz, and it features a 4″ WVGA screen. The Desire C’s processor comes in at 600 MHz, and it features a 3.5″ HVGA screen. Both devices are targeted at new smartphone owners looking for a budget-friendly device.

Finally, we have two US Carrier variants of the Optimus G, LG’s late 2012 flagship phone. Powered by the top-of-the-line quad-core Qualcomm Snapdragon S4 Pro processor, the device is certainly no slouch. The speedy processor is backed by 2 GB of RAM, 32 GB of ROM, a 4.7″ “True HD-IPS+” panel, LTE connectivity, and a 2100 mAh battery.

Looking to get in on the discussion? If so, be sure to head over to the new forums:

htc-droid-dna-3

As we all know, the first step when a new device is released is to get it rooted. For some devices, it can get pretty messy. For others though, it’s a tried and true method that works on many devices. For HTC devices, most of them have a single way of being rooted, starting with HTCDev. Now, the HTC Droid DNA is among the rooted.

XDA News Writer HQRaja has posted a root guide for the Droid DNA. It’s pretty typical for a HTC device, so those who are coming from another HTC device should feel at home. In short, use HTCDev’s website to unlock the device’s bootloader. From there, you Fastboot flash a custom recovery (both CWM and TWRP are available), and then flash the SuperSU and busybox package in your custom recovery.

As stated, previous HTC owners shouldn’t have many issues with this method, and users have reported that it works well. So if you want to get your device rooted, this is the guide for you. For full instructions and more, check out the root thread.

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