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Posts Tagged: HTC EVO View 4G

Jelly Bean Again

It would be redundant to mention yet again how prolific the spread of Jelly Bean has been over the last month and a half. With devices old and new, low spec’d and high spec’d alike, getting usable ports, it seems like almost any device is capable of running Google’s latest and greatest. To add to the already long list of devices, the HTC Flyer and EVO View 4G along with the Samsung Epic 4G Touch now have their own Jelly Bean ports.

The EVO View 4G and Flyer ports were both created by XDA Senior Member Dexter_nib with the help of several other members and developers. The Epic 4G Touch port was made by XDA Recognized Developer Sbrissen, who also helped out with AOSP ICS. Despite being early releases, both ROMs are surprisingly stable. For the EVO View/Flyer release, the following has been reported as not working.

- Bluetooth
– Videorecorder
– video hardware accelerated playback (use included MX player for most compatibility issues)

That’s not that too bad, and if you’re not a huge user of these features, then this actually could be used as a daily driver for you. The Epic 4G Touch release is equally as impressive as there are also only a few issues:

- LOS (this is kernel related and I am still trying to track it down)
– Random screen wakes
– Camcorder effects cause FC

Aside from these minor issues, this could also be used as a daily driver. Early adopters of the Epic Touch should be more than used to LOS (Loss Of Signal) problems by now, as that has been a bug since the device’s release. It is nice to see some more stable Jelly Bean builds being released, allowing  users to better experience the latest version of Android.

For more details, head on over to the EVO View 4G thread, the Flyer thread, or the Epic Touch thread.

Notes Mobile

The unofficial ethos of XDA is, always has been, and always will be centered around development and sharing. When devices come out, they are almost never live up to their full potential, and that’s quite frankly why websites like XDA exist—to make these devices better and share these improvements with others. In the spirit of sharing, the Lenovo Thinkpad has been sharing some of its apps with other tablets. XDA Senior Member Gumby63 has done a little work and has ported a couple of Lenovo-specific applications to the HTC Flyer and EVO View 4G—the FlexT9 keyboard and Notes Mobile, to be exact.

The applications are relatively easy to install. Simply download the device-specific update.zip file and flash via recovery. Additionally, Gumby63 has added some language packs for those who prefer to communicate in other languages. The applications themselves are fully working versions, so users shouldn’t expect any weird bugs or force closes.

You can find more information and download links in the applications thread. Happy flashing!

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sprit_eol_list

Not much ago we informed you about Sprint sending updates For HTC EVO 4G and EVO Design 4G which will remove the infamous Carrier IQ; well now it seems that not only Carrier IQ will be removed as the company included HTC EVO 4G and EVO View 4G on the most updated list of devices coming to End-Of-Life.

This means that both HTC devices are ending their days on the shelves. EVO 4G is expected to leave this week, and the EVO View 4G -Sprint´s version of HTC Flyer- will leave next week.

It´s amazing how carriers dictate when a device has become “old” even if it is not. Or perhaps the sales of those specific models are not going so well? -which I don´t think so-. Maybe it´s just another way to make space for the new upcoming line of devices that will pop out from MWC in just a few weeks.

Please tell us what you think and thanks for reading.
Source

htc_flyer_ics

Over the past two months, HTC has been rolling out Android 3.2 updates to the various HTC Flyer models available worldwide. The Honeycomb update gives the Flyer a new UI and access to tablet specific apps on the Android Market.

But many Android enthusiasts have been ecstatic about the update, also there has been good acceptance from the general public since the update entirely changes the UI and proved to be a good upgrade for those bored with Gingerbread or simply wanting to have the “latest”.

Well this nice device called Flyer has some more goodies for us!. According to an HTC customer service rep:

Those not satisfied with Android 3.2 on the HTC Flyer can revert it back to its out of the box experience or they can simply wait for the Android 4.0 update (Ice Cream Sandwich) which should be available within the next few months.

A passing reference from an HTC customer service rep is nice, but lets wait for an official announcement from HTC.
Based on the tablet’s hardware, perhaps we can see an official Android 4.0 software upgrade for the HTC Flyer in the first half of the year, lets hope this time HTC delivers on time the upgrade and make us all happy!
Source

2011-12-29_15-15-22

When the HTC Flyer and EVO View 4G were announced at Mobile World Congress 2011, many were disappointed to discover that not only would the pair of devices feature single-core processors, but that they would also ship with Android 2.3 Gingerbread. Despite these issues, the Flyer and EVO View 4G ultimately gained popularity due to their build quality, form factor, top notch aesthetics, and innovative HTC Scribe stylus.

Seven long months after launch, and more than a few months past schedule, HTC finally updated the pair of tablets to Android 3.2 Honeycomb in the beginning of last month. Unfortunately for those wishing for an unadulterated Honeycomb experience, the user experience was spattered with HTC SenseUI. Thankfully, we have developers at XDA who are up for just about any task—including cleaning up Sense bloat!

Working with the HTC Flyer variant, XDA forum member Westfire released an early and well-received Honeycomb ROM derived first from the leaked update and later from the official OTA. Westfire’s release eventually served as a base for forum member Gumby63‘s highly regarded DeSensified Honeycomb ROM. As its name implies, the DeSensified ROM removes much of HTC’s additions from the mix, giving users a nearly authentic Honeycomb experience. In order to not leave EVO View 4G owners in the cold, forum member graffixnyc then ported Gumby63’s DeSensified ROM as part of his DeSensed View ROM.

Looking to get some desensitized Honeycomb action on your devices? If so, continue on to the Flyer or EVO View 4G ROM threads. If you simply want to see what other ROMs are available for the devices, head over to the Flyer and EVO View 4G development forums.

HTC Kingdom Source Code Released

December 30, 2011   By:

htckingdom

I made a mistake.  A few days ago I reported that, with a slew of new kernel source codes posted on HTCdev, HTC is now GPL compliant.  That wasn’t true.  I found out after saying it again on XDA TV.  On Twitter, @gu1dry said,

@azrienoch Just finished the new XDA TV video, issue with the end, @HTC still hasn’t released source code for the Evo Design… :/

That was true.  Somehow, I overlooked the HTC Kingdom (HTC EVO Design 4G and HTC Hero S) when making my list of HTC’s non-GPL-compliant devices.

I don’t like being wrong.  And it looks like HTC doesn’t like it when I’m wrong, either.  Things get messy, or something.  So HTC fast-tracked the release of the Kingdom kernel source code.  It’s available on the HTCdev website.  So now, HTC is mostly GPL-compliant.

I was also reminded of the fact that GPL compliance means making an Android kernel source code available as soon as the Android device releases.  HTC has yet to do that.  Once they get a system in place to make that happen, they’ll be GPL-compliant.  I’m sure that with all the recent successes at HTCDev, we’ll see this soon.  Looking forward to it.  For now, being up to date with all the Android devices on shelves is definitely a victory for everyone.

honeycomb-2011-01-05

Livven has already talked about the Honeycomb update and you can find the article right here .

However, there has been new developments and we are happy to update you to let you know that the HTC Evo View 4g can now have Honeycomb, root and recovery thanks to XDA Member globatron .

If you take a stroll down XDA way and take a gander at this thread you can check out this early release of s-off instructions.

As globatron states in the thread,

This is an early version of the S-OFF procedure intended for experienced modders / developers not for general users, if you are neither of these, then it is not intended for you at this time.

So, as the warning states, unless you’re an experienced developer then you should probably stay away from this for the time being. However, this is the official “first step” in getting s-off, root and recovery to all Honeycomb-toting HTC Evo View users.

Despite not being a public release, it is encouraging to see that people are on the job and finding ways around the new framework and we’re sure there will be a public release very soon. Until then, though, you’ll have to keep tabs on the thread from the link above to keep up to date with the HTC View’s Honeycomb rooted goodness!

htc-evo-view-4g-horiz-5155149

According to reports in our forums and confirmed by Sprint Support, the EVO View 4G, essentially Sprint’s version of the HTC Flyer tablet, is now getting an update to Android 3.2.1 over-the-air. It brings all the Honeycomb goodness you’d expect, but, due to the differences to Gingerbread, will also reset your homescreen to factory-defaults. However, it’s strongly advised to hold off on the update if you’re rooted, as pointed out by forum member globatron:

  1. If you take this upgrade there is no HTC unlock for the View yet.
    • This means no root for now
    • This means no custom ROMs for now
    • This means no rollback to gingerbread for now
    • In other words this is a dead-end for now.
  2. There is no S-OFF tool for the view when running on HC (revolutionary will not work)
    • This means no root for now
    • This means no custom ROMs for now
    • This means no rollback to gingerbread for now
    • In other words this is a dead-end for now.
  3. There is currently no known working temp root exploit on HC (again this means no rollback)

For more information, see the forum thread.

wimaxdangerapp

I know that it has been a few weeks already, but we finally have green light to keep on going with our exclusive series of security holes on HTC’s latest devices. In case you just tuned in on the whole issue, we will be talking about vulnerabilities found on HTC handsets across the globe, particularly on the EVO family of devices as well as some of the newer ones like the HTC Sensation and Kingdom. XDA Recognized Developer TrevE has been doing a fantastic job in uncovering the holes one by one, and after much testing, he found some rather interesting results of things that could easily be obtained from your device(s) due to pieces of code inside of the manufacturer’s handsets that are exclusively in charge of collecting data and information about you, your usage, and many other things that you don’t want to see floating around on the internet. We are happy to report that HTC got their act together with the first vulnerability and got rid of the code responsible for the threat (htcloggers.apk).

As it was agreed between TrevE and HTC, our dev has been giving HTC head starts (5 working days) on virtually all issues before publicly disclosing them. Well, HTC has been making good use of their time for issue #2 as they are currently working towards a solution, but we will go ahead and let you know what this one is about. Those of you who enjoy the speeds of WiMax on their 4G enabled devices are doing so with an inherent risk. It turns out that WiMax is even more open than the HTC logger app. The more technical details are basically that an attacker who gains control over this can potentially manipulate data connectivity and to go even as far as being able to completely reprogram your device’s CDMA parameters remotely! This is done through two open ports that basically require no authentication and just as before, the only thing required for a malicious app to do anything is INTERNET permission. The other interesting thing that came out of this discovery is that apparently you can also send commands to the radio via the WiMaxmonitoring port, and sending a single coma can create an “out of bounds range exception” basically crashing your device. Here is a more detailed explanations of the whole thing:

——————————————————————————

Vulnerability: Android Security Elevation/Wimax Information Leak/Out of Bounds Crash
Products Affected: Any HTC device with wimax services running on ports 7773/7774/7775/7776
Vulnerability reported By: TrevE
——————————————————————————
Attached is a proof of concept showing manipulating wimax data connectivity.  Reading will only be demonstrated, but if someone was clever a few different attacks could be performed from stealing below information, to reprogramming with bogus/destructive values, possibly MITM data connections and more. WimaxMonitoring port also is able to crash the device if a comma is sent, it creates an index out of range exception.  The following services are able to be read and written by a malicious app with only permission INTERNETnetstat:
tcp        0      0 ::ffff:127.0.0.1:7775   :::*                    LISTEN      4327/system_server
tcp        0      0 127.0.0.1:7776          0.0.0.0:*               LISTEN      4230/wimaxDaemonsystem_server (port 7775) is a Wimax Monitoring socket. Not all commands are known at this time outside of:
getNaiDecoration
isDunMode
isReleaseKey/system/bin/wimaxDaemon (port 7776) Not all commands are known at this time outside of:
getMac
dumpMacTreeFromFlash
saveMacTreeToFlash
lockMacTree
unlockMacTree/system/bin/(get|set)WiMAXPropDaemon:
allows standard users read/write to root only file /data/wimax/wimax_properties used to manipulate wimax data connectivity (4g radio) by sending commands to TCP ports 7773/7774 with no authentication. Netstat:
tcp        0      0 127.0.0.1:7773          0.0.0.0:*               LISTEN      4210/setWiMAXPropDaemon
tcp        0      0 127.0.0.1:7774          0.0.0.0:*               LISTEN      4211/getWiMAXPropDaemon

File Accessed by method proving it should not be read from other than root or written at all:

-r–r—–    1 root     root       1048576 Oct  5 23:25 wimax_properties

Props able to be read/written:

persist.wimax.Cold_Boot_Flag 
persist.wimax.STANDBY_TIME 
persist.wimax.SCAN_RATE 
persist.wimax.Realm 
persist.wimax.CenterFrequency 
persist.wimax.Bandwidth 
persist.wimax.0.Man 
persist.wimax.0.Mod 
persist.wimax.0.FwV 
persist.wimax.0.HwV 
persist.wimax.0.SwV
persist.wimax.0.MAC 
persist.wimax.0.TO-FUMO-REF ./FUMO
persist.wimax.TO-WiMAX-REF ./WiMAXSupp
persist.wimax.IPv4 
persist.wimax.IPv6 
persist.wimax.ServerInitiated 
persist.wimax.CLInit.PollSuprt 
persist.wimax.CLInit.PollIntrvl
persist.wimax.WorkMode
persist.wimax.Session_Conti
persist.wimax.Scan_Timeout
persist.wimax.Scan_Retry
persist.wimax.Idle_Sleep
persist.wimax.Entry_RX 
persist.wimax.Entry_CINR
persist.wimax.Entry_Delay
persist.wimax.Exit_CINR
persist.wimax.Exit_Delay
persist.wimax.0.H-NSP-ID 
persist.wimax.OperatorName 
persist.wimax.PollingInterval 
persist.wimax.Primary.Name 
persist.wimax.Primary.Activated 
persist.wimax.0.METHOD-TYPE 
persist.wimax.0.VENDOR-ID 
persist.wimax.0.VENDOR-TYPE 
persist.wimax.0.USER-IDENTITY 
persist.wimax.0.PSEUDO-IDENTITY 
persist.wimax.0.PASSWORD 
persist.wimax.0.REALM 
persist.wimax.0.USE-PRIVACY 
persist.wimax.0.ENCAPS 
persist.wimax.0.VFY-SRVR-REALM 
persist.wimax.0.S-RLM.0.S-RLM 
persist.wimax.0.To-IP-REF ./IP  

 

 

 

 

Now, according to TrevE there are a few things that simply stand out as big “Why”‘s in here. Why is there a need for a WiMax monitoring port that can gather every single bit of information about your device and that can easily grant access to the device? This monitoring port also can check what you are running on your device (release keys) and finally it can check on the tethered state of the device. Secondly, and while this could be a simple coincidence, the timing from Sprint to limit the previously unlimited 4G seems a little odd. There could be a correlation between the existence of this reporting port to the usage of 4G in the network, which if TRUE, would mean that Sprint has been playing rather dirty all along, all that while putting our privacies at risk.

Well folks, there you have it. The holes in the different areas seem to have rather large implications if they are not taken care of soon enough. That being said, we have always been a proactive bunch when it comes to fixing broken code. Let’s get our heads together to ensure that HTC gets it done right the first time around, and as an added bonus for HTC, TrevE has been kind enough to provide a patch that completely eliminates this, which can be found here. Also, here is a description if you would rather apply this by hand:

To use edit init.shooter.rc to appear as below (or wherever binaries are started in ramdisk) and manually start them when you are going on 4g with attached app. 
———————-
service wimaxDaemon /system/bin/wimaxDaemon
   user root
   group root
    disabled
    oneshot

# setWMXPropd daemon
service setWMXPropd /system/bin/

setWiMAXPropDaemond
    user root
    group root
    disabled
    oneshot# getWMXPropd daemon
service getWMXPropd /system/bin/getWiMAXPropDaemond
    user root
    group root
    disabled
    oneshot

 

And remember, there are still more vulnerabilities to come, so please stay tuned for more.

You can find more information in the original thread ( http://forum.xda-developers.com/showthread.php?t=1322437) and here ( http://infectedrom.com/showthread.php/600-Vunerability-2-WiMax-Connectivity-Reprogramming)

Want something published in the Portal? Contact any News Writer.

Thanks TrevE for everything!

evoviewupdate102511

Earlier today, we saw that Sprint decided to hit the EVO family of devices with a much needed update for the security updates depicted in what we like to call PoC#1 (proof of concept #1), which was presented by XDA Recognized Developer TrevE. This security vulnerability basically allowed open access to sensitive device information thanks to a service built into the device of an apk called htclogger. As of the latest patch rolled out by HTC, this issue has finally been put to bed. It was confirmed that HTC has indeed removed said apk from the system thus effectively taking care of the original concern regarding consumer’s sensitive data being at stake. This was a good move by HTC and considering that the amount of bureaucracy and legal hoops that they must have gone through (let alone the amount of Quality Assurance and Final Testing by both HTC and the carriers), it was a remarkable thing that they were able to get a patch out in such a short period of time.

On the other hand, as with most processes that involve more than just one entity, there is always a bottleneck, something that will almost 100% guarantee that the update will not get to you at the same time as others. In this case, we have Sprint to blame for that and the reason is rather simple. Just think about the massive amount of data that needs to be moved and pushed to the millions of customers across their network, even if it is only 5 MB, as it was the case with the latest patch, when you multiply this by the number of users who will need this, the capacity of the network becomes a concern. They need to maintain service also for those millions of customers and if they were to push out the update to everyone all at once, you’d likely experience service interruptions. Sprint’s (and really most carrier’s) technique to avoid this is to push the OTA updates in waves.

Now that we laid down the groundwork for the point, lets cut right down to the chase. The roll-out to customers via OTA updates is a rather unnecessary step in this whole process. Why? I don’t know about you, but my EVO 3D is fitted with a wonderful tiny radio chip that allows me to connect via Wifi and I also have a quizillion other ways to get to the internet. See where I am going? What is the point of rolling something like this via OTA? I have personally followed HTC’s website for a very long time and as far as I can remember, they have always offered updates via direct downloads in their site. I understand that not everyone will know how to run a RUU or to even flash a zip as not every Android owner knows what he/she has in their hands, but allowing the end user to apply the patch directly from the manufacturer’s site would have the following impacts:

  • Much less strain on the network;
  • Reduced download times for consumers (although, due to this being such a small update, the speed is somewhat arguable);
  • Faster response time to an inherently bad problem;
  • You’d get to educate your customers as to what is going on rather than simply saying “here, install this… it is for your own good”;
  • You get to use your site a little more, which in turn will provide more exposure to your products as people may navigate to the products page to see what’s new.
Having to put this through a network certainly adds an extra step to the overall process. On top of that, the “waves” approach only ends up delaying the patch for everyone. You have got to keep one very important thing in mind, your customers know that you are the makers of the devices and not the carriers. When they see faulty code, it will likely fall on your lap and not on Sprint, T-Mobile, etc. Regardless of your contractual obligations with the other carriers, you should still offer the update as a direct download from your site. You will benefit from much reduced turn around times, which in turn will make people happy about the fact that you are responsive, which in turn will likely ensure that your current customers don’t jump ship to someone else, which in turn will turn said current customers into repeat buyers. The tl;dr (too long; didn’t read) version of what I just said? Fast support ensures continued sales. Remember this very important rule about manufacturing and sales… “you can always sell a box once, but if your support for that box is poor… that one box will be the last one you sell.”
All in all, kudos for the fast response, HTC :) We’ll see you on PoC#2! Hopefully, you will consider some of this.
Want something published in the Portal? Contact any News Writer.
Thanks GODZSON and joshman99 for the tip!
HTC-Flyer_1

Yesterday, we published an article about a major “oops” that was found on both the HTC Flyer and EVO View 4G, which essentially prevents you from using a Bluetooth headset to use it as a microphone. Well, it looks like our developers are not the type to sit and wait until a proper fix is released by the manufacturer, so the matters were once again picked up as projects by our members. In this particular case, XDA member clubtech decided that he wanted to have the phone functionality that is built in Android available on his Flyer, so he tweaked several parameters and after playing enough with them, he finally got Android to show the infamous calling icon. However, this tale of self improvement does not end here, because in his quest to make it even more functional, the dev has added the missing aforementioned functionality of BT headset to the device. Moreover, the dev has provided us with a very clear set of instructions on how to achieve this. The only pre-requisites for this are that you are S-OFF and rooted. The S-OFF is of utmost importance due to the settings reverting back if you are just temp rooted.

Please leave some feedback for the dev if you think this worked well.

Tested on a 3G UK unlocked flyer using an AT&T SIM.

You can find more information in the original thread.

Want something published in the Portal? Contact any News Writer.

Thanks GODZSON for the tip!

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