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Posts Tagged: HTC One (2014)

HTC One M8

Shortly after the USA Unlocked and Developer Editions of the HTC One M8 received the Android 4.4.3 update, the OTA has begun rolling out to users of the European version of the device as well. As stated by Mo Versi, Vice President, Product management at HTC, the update includes all the security fixes from Android 4.4.4 despite carrying the lower version number. Along with the security fixes, the update includes application updates the Camera, Gallery and HTC Sync Manager. Under the hood, Boomsound, Motion Launch and Power Savings Mode have also received updates. 

As usual, the OTA is rolling out to unlocked devices for now, with carrier versions following up sometime in the future. Head on over to the HTC One M8 OTA discussion thread to discuss the update or download the OTA zip. The software version is 2.22.401.4 and weighs in at 613MB

HTC Kernel Source

Just one week ago, the Sprint HTC One M8 received its official update to the recently released Android 4.4.3. Now, HTC has released the GPL-mandated kernel source code for this update, as well as for an upcoming Android 4.4.3 update to the HTC One M7 (Developer Edition).

The kernel source for the Sprint HTC One M8 corresponds to software revision 2.16.651.4_R2, while the kernel source for the M7 Developer Edition corresponds to its 6.07.1540.1 update. Both kernels come in at Linux version 3.4.0, and they are for their devices’ respective Android 4.4.3 updates. As always, these files are of no major consequence to traditional end users. However, aftermarket kernel and ROM developers looking to create or update source-built development projects will undoubtedly find them helpful.

If you’re a third-party ROM or kernel developer looking to work on the M7 developer edition or Sprint M8, head over to the HTCDev source links below to get in on the action. That said, given the source code update for the M7 developer edition, we wouldn’t be surprised to see the update start rolling out in the very near future.

[Source: HTCDev (Sprint M8 4.4.3, M7 Developer Edition) | Via Twitter]

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Snapdragon 801 PVS BIN Guide

Anyone who’s ever delved into the world of overclocking will readily tell you that this is a field where the old adage “your mileage may vary” most definitely applies. But while individual luck of the draw will vary from chip to chip, there are certain factors that influence how well a particular chip overclocks or how low of a voltage it can put up with at any particular frequency.

Component manufacturers are well aware of this, and often use factors such as transistor leakage to selectively “bin” processors according to how highly they can clock or how little voltage is required to reach a certain clock. This then allows manufacturers to get the most out of any individual unit.

All of this factory optimization isn’t to say that we as consumers can’t do a bit more optimization themselves. This is after all why we are still able to overclock and undervolt our own components. But unfortunately, we don’t often have access to the binning data of our particular components. And even if we know the PVS bin for our particular device, we rarely know how this fits into the larger overall picture with regards to other devices of the same chip.

XDA Recognized Developer HD2Owner decided to make things a bit more straightforward by creating a table and chart with all known PVS bin data for the Snapdragon 801 processor. The data is specifically for the HTC One M8 (2014) and Samsung Galaxy S5, though it may also be of use to owners of other devices powered by the 801. And with this information, users will have a rough idea of what voltages to try at certain frequencies.

Those looking to learn more about Snapdragon 801 binning can head over to the original thread.

htc - Android L

We still don’t know what the “L” in Android L stands for, but we’re already salivating at what this update will bring to consumer devices. Promising improved performance, a refreshed UI, better battery life, and much more; L is a legitimately significant release, and possibly the most important version since Ice Cream Sandwich.

With all of the new features introduced in L, it’s no wonder that many users are now wondering when they’ll get to experience this latest version on their own devices. We already know that the developer preview will be available for the Nexus 5 and Nexus 7 (2013) tomorrow. And now, HTC has taken the opportunity to commit to releasing Android L updates to all variants of the HTC One M8 (2014) and One M7 within 90 days of receiving the final software from Google.

HTC Customers and Enthusiasts,

HTC is excited about the new features in Android L release and we can’t wait to share them with you. We are committed to updating our flagship HTC One family as fast as possible as part of our HTC Advantage program. We will begin rolling out updates to the HTC One (M8) and HTC One (M7) worldwide within 90 days of receiving final software from Google, followed shortly thereafter by other One family members and select devices. HTC Advantage protects your smartphone investment, ensuring you have the best smartphone experience long after purchase.

This is certainly good to hear from HTC. And thanks to their great track record in meeting (or nearly meeting) their own self-imposed deadlines, we’re optimistic about this actually coming to fruition. Obviously we don’t yet know when Android L will be released, but it’s reasonable to assume a late Fall / early Winter timetable, which means that L will reach consumer HTC One devices some time early 2015.

[Source: HTC Software Updates, HTC Blog]

2014-05-30

Aside from its fantastic screen, delicious industrial design, fantastic build quality, and high end internals, one of the best features of the HTC One M8 (2014) is undoubtedly support for HTC’s Dot View case. For the unaware, Dot View is a dual-purpose case that not only protects your device from harm, but also gives you access to certain notifications, lets you take calls, get weather updates, and much more.

While Dot View is an utterly fantastic concept, notifications presented using HTC’s implementation are understandably limited to HTC-specific apps. However, wouldn’t it be much more useful if all system notifications were viewable through the case’s carefully crafted holes? Well, thanks to Recognized Developer j to the 4n, this is now possible.

As can be seen in the video below, Venom DotView notifications adds in the missing functionality by allowing notifications from any application to show up.

This feature will make its way into to the next version of VenomOne for the M8 (1.70.), but Jan decided to also make it compatible with any Sense ROM running the latest base firmware. As such, there are two versions: one that works with VenomOne 1.6.0, and one meant for stock Sense-based ROMs. Naturally, you need both root access and a custom recovery to apply this modification.

If you’ve got a Dot View case and want to make the most of it, head over to the original thread and give Venom DotView Notifications a try!

[Many thanks to Forum Moderator Whiskey103 for the tip!]

GPe

Today will undoubtedly be remembered the day of Android 4.4.3–at least among us die hard Android fans. Immediately following yesterday’s official release, we’ve seen quite a bit of Android 4.4.3-related activity. Early this morning, we saw the Android 4.4.3 OTA make its way over to the WiFi-only variant of the Google Nexus 7 (2013). Just a few hours later, we talked about all of the changes made in 4.4.3. Not too long after, Motorola began updating its “Moto” devices to 4.4.3. And finally, Google began rolling out the 4.4.3 incremental OTA to the flagship Nexus 5.

Now, we’ve just gotten word that Android 4.4.3 has started making its way out to various Google Play edition devices. The first to receive the updates are the Google Play editions of the HTC One M7, HTC One M8 (2014), Galaxy S 4, and Sony Z Ultra. For those keeping track, we’re still waiting for updates on the GPe variants of the LG G Pad 8.3 and Moto G. That said, we wouldn’t be surprised if these updates surface rather quickly–especially the update for the G, in light of Motorola’s announcement earlier.

Naturally, these updates will make their way out to consumer devices via staged OTA rollouts. As such, not every device will be in the initial wave. However, XDA Recognized Contributor / “Resident Archivist-in-Chief” oldblue910 has an utterly fantastic series of stock OTA reference threads for all current GPe and Nexus devices.

Finally, HTC has gone ahead and published the GPL-mandated kernel source code for the two HTC GPe updates above.

Let’s not act too surprised at the expedient release of these updates. After all, due to the lack of OEM customizations and direct updates from Google, this is to be expected. That said, today’s a very good day for GPe device owners.

PS. Don’t forget to show your appreciation to oldblue910 for taking the time to maintain these OTA reference threads by clicking “thanks” on his thread OPs if you haven’t already!

htc-one-m8-vs-one-m7-22

You may recall that just a few days ago, we saw a Sense 6-laden update roll out for the developer and unlocked HTC One. And a few months prior, we saw an update make its way to the Sprint HTC One M8 (2014), which brought the new Extreme Power Savings Mode. Now, two very similar updates are making their rounds to the T-Mobile HTC One M7 and T-Mobile HTC One (M8), respectively.

First up, we have the last generation HTC One M7 on T-Mobile, which is now the first carrier-branded M7 to receive Sense 6. This OTA updates your device to software version 5.14.531.1, up from the previously available 4.19.531.10. It comes in at a rather hefty 695 MB, which is to be expected given that this brings the device to Sense 6.

Although no official changelog exists on T-Mobile’s update support page for the M7, it’s safe to assume that this update packs the same goodies that we saw make their way to the developer and unlocked devices earlier this week. In short, it should brings most of the M8’s software features to the M7. For a refresher, Sense 6 includes an updated UI color palate and support for multiple themes, an updated BlinkFeed interface with more news sources, and a simplified camera, gallery, and app tray. In addition to the Sense 6 features, it’s highly likely that this update also brings the new Extreme Power Saving mode to the M7, as well as a button to clear all recent apps—just like we saw in the update to the developer and unlocked M7.

Next up, we have T-Mobile’s variant of the M8. This 229.8 MB update brings the device to software version number 1.57.531.7, up from the previously available 1.12.531.19 build. As stated on T-Mobile’s software update page for the M8, this update brings a number of improvements such as improved battery life, the new Extreme Power Saving mode, and improved WiFi performance. And for those curious about what the new Extreme Power Saving mode actually does, it extends your battery life by “conserving CPU usage, reducing screen brightness, turning off vibration feedback, turning off data connection when screen is off, allowing only essential apps to run, and turning off pedometer.” It can be toggled via a status bar quick control. And as you’d expect from the name, enabling this new mode is pretty much a last resort. This is because when enabled, you’ll be prevented from doing pretty much anything with your device other than make calls, send texts and emails, check your calendar, and use the calculator.

Both updates are currently making their way out to consumer devices via staged OTA rollouts. Unfortunately, however, not every device will be in the initial wave. Luckily for T-Mobile M8 owners, XDA Senior Member altimax98 was kind enough to pull and mirror the M8′s update for use on stock, unrooted devices running the stock recovery. Alas, there is no captured and mirrored update just yet for the T-Mobile M7, but once someone captures it, you’ll be able to find it in this thread.

plusblue

Although there are dozens of great source-built, AOSP-derived custom ROMs available for the choosing, the most popular option is still undoubtedly the first large-scale project of its kind: CyanogenMod. Because of this, it’s always quite exciting when official CyanogenMod support is extended to any particular device. Now we’re happy to share that official support has been added for two new devices, with two more on the way.

First up, we have CyanogenMod nightlies for the HTC One M8 (2014). Official support for the M8 actually began two days ago, and the buildbot has been chugging away ever since, offering three publicly available nightly builds to date. As described on CyanogenMod’s Google+ announcement post, these “m8″ builds are compatible with the GSM, Sprint, and Verizon models. In other words, this is compatible with 0P6B10000 (International), 0P6B12000 (AT&T/Dev Edition), 0P6B13000 (T-Mobile), 0P6B16000 (Telus/Rogers Canada), 0P6B20000 (Verizon), and 0P6B20000 (Verizon) devices. These nightlies are brought to you courtesy of CM developers deck, invisiblek, h8rift, toastcfh, flinny and xInterlopeRx.

Next up, we have the Samsung Galaxy Tab Pro 8.4. Official support for the ‘mondrianwifi’ began earlier today, with one nightly build available to date. The maintainer for this device is CM developer crpalmer.

Finally, we have the Sprint Galaxy S5 (kltespr) and the LTE version of the Samsung Galaxy Note 8.0 (n5120). Development for these devices will come courtesy of CM developers Xda Garwynn, Esa Laukkanen, and Scott Brissenden. Unfortunately, there aren’t any nightlies available for either of these devices just yet, but be happy to know that they’re on the way.

Head over to the CyanogenMod Download page for your device to get started:

And once you’ve gotten CM11 on your device (or to read up on guides to obtain root, flash a recovery, and flash a rom), head over to your device-specific forums for the HTC One M8 (2014)Samsung Galaxy Tab Pro 8.4Sprint Galaxy S5, and Samsung Galaxy Note 8.0.

BnIOxKIIMAAk0-c

Back at the tail end of last month, we talked about how HTC had updated its software update pages to display their progress in bringing Sense 6 to older devices. At the time, every available HTC One Max variant and practically all of the M7 devices were receiving carrier bloatware as part of the “integration” stage.

Now less than one month later, almost all of these devices are  prepping for release in the “certification” phase. However, one stands above the rest in receiving the Sense 6 update first, and that’s Sprint variant of the HTC One Max.

The update, which first began making its way to consumer devices earlier today, comes in at software version 3.02.651.5. As expected, it brings Sense 6 to the device, as well as practically all of the features of the HTC One M8 (2014) except for Motion Launch. This includes new gallery and camera apps, BlinkFeed improvements, Sense TV enhancements, a button to clear all recent apps, and the Extreme Power Savings mode we first saw a little while back on the Sprint HTC One M8.

The update will eventually make its way out to consumer devices on Sprint over the course of the coming week or two. However, XDA Senior Member nfinitefx45 has gone ahead and mirrored the OTA for your sideloading pleasure. Naturally to install this, you need to be on stock software and be running the stock recovery.

Head over to the captured OTA thread to get your fix early. And if you’re on another carrier, keep your eyes peeled, as the update will be hitting your device soon as well!

[Screenshot courtesy of XDA Forum Member LlabTooFeR | Many thanks to XDA Portal Supporter Titokhan for the tip!]

Jordan0418

Android KitKat for Google Glass has been rolled out! That and much more news is covered by Jordan, as he reviews all the important stories from this week. Included in this week’s news is the announcement that Android 4.4.3 is being rolled out to the Google Nexus 5 (sort of) and that HTC Sense 6 has been ported to the Nexus 5! That’s not all that’s covered in today’s video!

Jordan talks about the other videos released this week on XDA Developer TV. XDA Developer TV Producer TK released an Xposed Tuesday video for Call Blocker. Then, AdamOutler told you how to hack an Android App. Later, TK gave us an Android App Review of Lockdown Pro. Pull up a chair and check out this video.

READ ON »

Dual_Flash

One of the highlights of the HTC One M8 is its new dual lens camera system. Termed “Duo Camera,” this innovative system allows the device to capture depth data in addition to standard imaging data. The Duo Camera System then maps this captured distance information to each pixel taken by the main camera in order to achieve various types of effects such as depth-of-field blur ( i.e. bokeh), as well as Lytro-style refocusing effects.

Up until now, the full functionality of the Duo Camera System has only been accessible through HTC’s first party camera application. Today, however, HTC opened up the Duo Camera System API for use by third party developers.

The Dual Lens SDK currently consists of two APIs: Dual Lens and DimensionPlus. The Dual Lens API allows developers to obtain and manage a bokeh strength map mask that can be mapped to the main camera’s image data. The DimensionPlus, API on the other hand, allows developers to export to the DimensionPlus file format in order to keep both depth and image data in one file.

The Dual Lens SDK is currently available in the form of an initial preview, so it is possible that more functionality will be added in the future or that current implementations may not be compatible with future software revisions. That said, it’s exciting that HTC decided to open up the APIs behind its most notable camera feature.

Developers looking to play around with and develop for the HTC Duo Camera System should head over to the HTC Dual Lens SDK site to learn more.

380335NexSense

The Google Nexus 5 is regarded as having everything an Android user needs or wants: timely updates, fantastic specs, and a fabulous design. However, one could beg to differ by saying that it being a Nexus device means that it naturally would not have UI of other devices, such as Samsung’s TouchWiz or HTC’s Sense. How sorely wrong they are.

As seen time and time again, if a Nexus device has its eyes set on something it likes, it’s going to have it, one way or another. The recent port of HTC’s Sense 6.0 to the Nexus 5 stands testament to this. This is thanks to XDA Recognized Contributor GalaxyUser, who has managed to port the UI from the HTC One M8. It’s still in its alpha stage, so only a few functions are working. This includes:

  • Touchscreen
  • SIM card detection
  • SMS and phone callsRIL
  • WiFi
  • Internal SD Card
  • Vibration
  • Bluetooth
  • Sensors (Light/Orientation/Proximity)

Due to its alpha nature, GalaxyUser wants to make it clear that N5 owners looking to try this out should stay away from actually using this port, unless they’re a developer who can contribute to the project in some way.

If you absolutely cannot wait to give this a go, or if you want to find out more about the progress of the project, make your way over to the original thread for more information.

AgsV

There are more than a few excellent options in the custom recovery world nowadays. Although the most common aftermarket solution is still ClockworkMod Recovery and its ports after all these years, many are growing increasingly partial to TWRP’s blend of innovative features, fantastic UI, and overall user friendliness. Thus, it’s naturally quite a big deal when an official TWRP port hits a device.

You may recall that a few weeks ago, we added forums for the Oppo Find 7. Now, XDA Senior Recognized Developer Dees_Troy has gone ahead and given it some official TWRP love. But before you go ahead and install it on your device, there’s one small caveat. Currently, TWRP for the Find 7 only supports the 7a model, which is the version with the 1o80p screen. As such, it’s currently untested on the higher end, Quad HD variant, and will likely not display properly due to the display differences—assuming it works at all.

The Find 7 isn’t the only device receiving the official TWRP love. Senior Recognized Developer Dees_Troy and Recognized Developers jmz and simonsickle also managed to bring this touch-friendly recovery to the GSM, Sprint, and Verizon variants of the HTC One M8 (2014).

Both builds offer the full TWRP 2.7.0.0 featureset. And with the exception of the minor caveat regarding the Find 7 build (confirmed working on only the 1080p variant), everything should work as planned. So if you’ve got yourself a Find 7a (1080p) or a GSM, Sprint, or Verizon variant of the HTC One M8 (2014), head over to the threads below to get your TWRP on.

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