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Posts Tagged: HTC One S

Geekswipe_Ok_Google_Res_1

Being able to say “OK Google” from the comfort of your home screen was introduced alongside the Nexus 5′s Google Experience Launcher a few months ago. It allows users to control their devices with just their voice, as saying “OK Google” launches the voice command detection mode. With the newest update of Google Search, “OK Google” can finally detect languages other than English, and it works perfectly fine with other devices, but a little “hack” is needed.

XDA Recognized Developer memnoc wrote a handy guide describing how to activate this functionality on a device other than the Nexus 5. The hack isn’t overly complicated, and all you need is root access and a decent file manager.

The method is a chain of copy-paste operations and one simple bin file edit. The described method should work on all devices with Android 4.4.2, and was confirmed on the Nexus 5, Nexus 4, and HTC One S—and even non-AOSP ROMs are supported. It’s definitely great that the hot word detection is finally available for other devices and languages, as not everybody can speak English with a perfect accent.

If you have Android 4.4.2 on your device and want to speak to your device, go to the guide thread, follow the steps, and enjoy your device’s newly found abilities.

android-logo-

android-logo-

Android is now 6 years old. Over the years, Android was able to command over 80% of the market, while leaving iOS and Windows Mobile/Phone behind. Thus, this moment is ripe to look back at how the story of the little green robot began.

Android was presented in November 2007, but September 22, 2008 marked the “real” beginning. On that day, the HTC Dream (also known as the T-Mobile G1) was presented. The beginning wasn’t nice and easy, though. Many critics claimed that the OS would never be able to beat out those made by Apple and Microsoft. At the time, these opinions were quite valid. After all, Android back then greatly differed from the highly customized builds now released by Sony, LG, HTC, and Samsung.

Early versions of Android were meant to call, send and receive text messages, and connect to the Internet. The thing that made Android unique was that it was open source, and users were able to contribute to the code to add in innovative ideas. READ ON »

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Sceenshot-CapButnBrightnessPro-1.0.11-1

Hardware capacitive buttons seem to be a love-it-or-hate-it affair. While many of us seem to prefer the versatility of the on-screen buttons most commonly seen on modern Nexus devices, others instead favor the increased usable screen real estate made possible by having dedicated keys outside of the display.

If you happen to own an HTC device, you are probably a fan of dedicated hardware buttons. But that’s not to say that you can’t tweak them to make them work better for you. XDA Senior Member denversc created an app called Capacitive Buttons Brightness, which does… Well, you guessed it. It allows you to change the brightness of your capacitive buttons.

Currently, the app officially supports the HTC One X (dual- and quad-core variants), HTC One X+, HTC One, and HTC One S. That said, many users have found that it also works on other devices such as the HTC One V, HTC Desire HD, HTC Evo 3D, Motorola Droid MAXX, and LG Optimus G.

The app allows you to change brightness in 3 steps: dim, bright, and off. The default on most Sense-based ROMs seems to be bright, whereas it is usually set to dim on most AOSP-based ROMs. Please note that the “off” setting does not work if you have the GV Integration app installed. Naturally, root access is required… But who here isn’t rooted anyway?

Make your way over to the application thread to get started. And if you wish to build from this app, head over to the project’s Google Code page.

Capture

Do you consider yourself a die hard HTC fan? If so, we can’t blame you. Their latest flagship, the HTC One, has been a great success, combining great build quality, snappy internals, and a remarkable screen.

If you’re a fan, we wouldn’t be surprised if you already have something in your forum signature displaying your patronage to Taiwan’s most prominent smartphone manufacturer. However, having more options is never a bad thing.

XDA Forum Member Sgt-Obst created and shared a collection of HTC-loving banners. Stylish and sleek, these 500 x 100 images are perfectly sized for use in your forum signature. Images for the HTC One, HTC One X, HTC One S, HTC One Mini, and HTC Sensation XE are included, as well as images showing love towards HTC Dev and Sense UI.

Sgt-Obst is also taking requests for future devices to be added to the banner list, so head over to the original thread to show your HTC love.

DNASoff

One of the biggest possible hacks for most current Android devices is the ability to completely remove security flags from the bootloader. Most companies these days will give you some way to unlock your device’s bootloaders, but many are simply partial unlocks, while others are entirely not unlockable. HTC is one such company that offers what is known as a “developer unlock” through the htcdev service. However, as stated already this is but a partial unlock, which allows you to do a few fun things like flashing custom recoveries and using them to flash new ROMs. This is good, but it is quite limited, and you must have access to a PC to use fastboot commands in order to do more. This is normally overcome by disabling the HBOOT security flags, which is not an easy task. Every time HTC releases a new HBOOT, it comes loaded with patches to try and keep people from achieving a complete unlock (S-OFF). If you have either an One S, One XL, and Droid DNA your luck has just changed, courtesy of XDA Recognized Developers beaups and XDA Elite Recognized Developer jcase.

The process involves flashing a file through fastboot, which essentially removes eMMC write protection. After that, a second file is pushed into /data/local/temp, which removes all the S-OFF flags on the device. The only real requirement to perform this procedure (aside from having a PC with adb and fastboot) is that you are SuperCID. The latter (which stands for Super Country ID  in case you are not familiar) is a protection to prevent you from flashing a RUU meant for a different region. This is a protection that has been around since the days of the HTC Wizard, and it is still present to this day. The flashing of the original zip requires you to have SuperCID off (rooting and custom recovery are not required for this to work). Luckily, this has already been achieved for all three devices, but it seems to have been blocked yet again after a recent OTA update. So, if you have not SuperCID’ed your device yet, do not attempt to do this! Having said that, stay tuned; a fix is on its way.

Please read the procedure carefully and thoroughly. Achieving S-OFF does involve some risk, and as such, there is a chance of bricking. That being said, rewards await you once the device is fully S-OFF, so make haste! Oh and just as your momma told you… don’t accept candies from strangers or OTAs from manufacturers. Have fun and happy unlocking!

Welcome to Facepalm S-Off for modern HTC phones

You can visit the original threads in the One S, One XL, and DNA sections for more information.

Want something published in the Portal? Contact any News Writer

[Thanks xHausx and E.Cadro for the tip!]

pacman

As our readers are no doubt aware, the PACman ROM kang has appeared on a variety of devices. It’s a truly unique concept. It represents much of the best that AOSP has to offer currently all in a single package. It’s been spreading across XDA, and it seems like it’s going to keep going. PACman is now available on the HTC One S and the T-Mobile Samsung Galaxy S III.

XDA Recognized Developer klin1344 released the ROMs for both devices. Both ROMs are surprisingly stable. Outside of some initial problems here and there, users have reported that both ROMs are fairly stable and users can flash them as daily drivers. Of course, users are reporting some issues, but most of them so far have been from inexperience with various settings menus. As klin1344 explains:

Attention! Because this is a mashup of CM10, AOKP, and PA, there are some settings that might conflict with others because they are duplicate. Please keep that in mind before you begin to wonder if there is a bug in this ROM. Thanks.

So if you’re having problems deciding which AOSP ROM to flash, why not try all at once? Just head to the Galaxy S III PACman thread or the HTC One S PACman thread for more details.

OneS

When the HTC One S was first released, it came in a sleek gray and blue color scheme. A black variant also appeared. And while the gray and blue variant is pretty sleek, some users prefer the black version. However, not all wish to buy a new phone just to update their aesthetics. There is now a way to acquire the looks of the other.

XDA Recognized Developer and Contributor Zarboz released a hardware mod tutorial that helps users deconstruct the One S and put it back together. That’s with shiny new black hardware. The process is, as one would expect, pretty complicated, and requires a good number of tools. However, Zarboz is quite helpful with that. Aside from a complete tools list, another list was also provided that details the parts that need to be replaced.

Essentially, it’s a disassemble guide except when you reassemble the One S, you’ll put the black One S parts back on it. For those who enjoy disassembling things, this will be delightful. However, it is a dangerous process that could irreparably damage the One S. Proceed at your own risk.

For the full, picture-laden tutorial, check out the original thread.

TWRP

The last time we brought you news about TWRP, it was to announce that TWRP 2.2.2 had been released. It had fixed a lot of bugs from the initial release of TWRP 2.2 and added a few new features. Very recently, TWRP has been updated again to version 2.3.

There were a whole bunch of awesome improvements with TWRP 2.2 and a lot of unique and brand new features as well. TWRP 2.3 promises no less. The official change log includes:

Rebased onto AOSP Jelly Bean source code
Rewrote backup, restore, wipe, and mount code in C++ classes for easier maintenance going forward
NOTE: backups from prior versions of TWRP are still compatible with 2.3
ADB sideload functionality from AOSP is included in 2.3, see this link for more info
Re-wrote fix permissions entirely in C++ and runs in a few seconds instead of a few minutes (thanks to bigbiff)
Improvements to zip finding in OpenRecoveryScript (should be a lot fewer GooManager automation issues)
Faster boot times
Added charging indicator while in recovery (only updates once every 60 seconds)

Additionally, XDA Recognized Developer Dees_Troy has reported that there is now support for spaces in backup names. Before, if you added a space to the name of a backup, it would not restore. Now users can use whatever naming convention they want.

One of the biggest changes, though, is all of the TWRP being rewritten in C++ and its move to recovery API 3 instead of API 2. With the code rewrite, it will allow TWRP to update more quickly and with more stability. With the API 3 change, it means that some flashable zip files may stop working because the developer needs to update the update-binary. If you don’t want to wait for the developer, or the developer has ceased working on the project, you can find one to use on TWRP’s official website. To install the latest TWRP, you can use the Goomanager application. Simply open the application, hit menu, and install open recovery.

If you want to check out the latest TWRP recovery for your device, check one of the links below.

HTC One S Data Speed Fix

If you have flashed a custom ROM on your HTC One S and subsequently noticed a drop in your HSPA+ download speed, you’re not the only one. Several users have reported speed drops to 3-4 Mbps from 10-14 Mbps after flashing a custom ROM. Luckily, we now have a solution that should bring your data speed back to the HSPA+ levels.

When XDA Forum Member TechieGeek started experiencing low download speed on his One S after switching from stock to CM10, he found that the problem was due to baseband compatibility issues. Flashing a new baseband and changing some settings in the build.prop fixed the issue. Judging from the response, the method seems to work for those who try. However, this will only help if your carrier is actually capable of delivering speeds greater than the lower values.

The complete instructions can be found in the forum thread, so head over and get your HTC One S back in the fast lane.

cyanogenmod-team-details-plans-for-android-and-cm_irfn-_0

The CyanogenMod crew has added four new devices to their officially supported lineup. This is exciting news, considering the popularity of the devices in question. These four flagship-status devices are some of the most widely-used phones on the market today. The list of devices and maintainers is as follows:

This is great news for owners of these devices, since the aforementioned HTC and Samsung devices natively run HTC Sense and Samsung TouchWiz, respectively. Many users prefer a fully functional AOSP-based build to these bloated default ROMs, and CyanogenMod 10 fits the bill as an Android 4.1 ROM with some discrete, yet highly functional modifications. Keep your eye on the device forums to catch the latest release candidates, and try not to ask for ETAs!

Jelly Bean

The march of Jelly Bean 2012 has been a massive success. With dozens of devices getting ports that at least boot and even more scheduled to get them, Jelly Bean has been like a party that everyone is invited to. Well, the fun hasn’t stopped yet. In fact, it hasn’t even appeared to have slowed down, as even more devices are getting Jelly Bean one way or another. The most recent legion of devices include the HTC One S, the Sony Xperia X10 Mini and the Sony Xperia X8.

XDA Senior Member fipsib, posted CM10 running on XDA for the One S which was developed by XDA Senior Member xkonni with help from XDA Forum Member intervigil. For the Xperia X10 Mini and X8, the JBMiniProject lays claim and includes XDA Recognized Developer stelios97, XDA Senior Member Daveee10, and XDA Senior Member Xmaster8, with the help of a few others.

The One S CM10 is quite functionally complete, with only a few features not working. These include the camera, USB Tethering, and a few quirky issues like echos during phone calls. Many of the issues have hotfixes that haven’t been merged into the ROM yet. But aside from a few little glitches, the ROM is actually quite usable.

It’s much the same on the X10 Mini, with WiFi, Camera, and Mic being the biggest issues. The X8 is a little behind, missing features like data, WiFi, Mic, Camera, and several more. These Xperia builds probably can’t yet be used as daily drivers, at least not until a few more things are fixed. However, they are certainly off to a great start. While we don’t normally write about tales from the grapevine, the word around is that the X10 Mini Pro is also getting a CM10 port pretty soon.

For additional information, check out the corresponding links below.

will verduzco wishes he had these lol

We’ve brought you news of camera mods being ported and released across XDA. With popular HTC devices such as the Sensation and EVO LTE receiving camera mods, it was only a matter of time before other members of HTC’s lineup including  the HTC One S were given such changes.

Called ZeroCamera, the mod focuses more on video quality rather than picture quality, but includes both. Developed by XDA Senior Member zeroprobe, the mod increases video quality during 1080p recording. The result is a much cleaner, much better video experience for users.

The encoding settings available are:

20Mbps / JPEG 100
20Mbps / JPEG 100 + Volume Shutter
40Mbps / JPEG 100
40Mbps / JPEG 100 + Volume Shutter
Stock 12Mbps
Stock 12Mbps / JPEG 100
Stock 12Mbps / JPEG 100 + Volume Shutter
Stock 12Mbps + Volume Shutter

For download links, screen shots, and more, check out the original thread.

Bootloader Customizer

Not too long ago, we brought you news that allowed HTC EVO 4G LTE users to customize their bootloaders. The process was pretty cool, allowing users to make their bootloader look however they want—including making it look unhacked. After the initial project was released, users clamored for this to be made available to more devices. The requests were heard and responded to. Now, the plugin has been made available to make the bootloader customizer for a number of HTC devices.

The process for a developer to port this is not hard. XDA Recognized Contributor regaw_leinad, who developed the application and plugin, takes a time out from the stags (yes, that’s really him) to explain how:

it’s basically all written, they just need to fill in the values for their hboot, and embed the hboot.img into the exe. I already have a placeholder for the hboot.img and android-info.txt so a drag and drop over them should keep it embedded.

Regaw_leinad is also creating the application for the supported devices, but wanted to release the plugin first so users had a chance to get it sooner. The current list of supported HTC devices include:

  • HTC EVO 4G LTE
  • HTC EVO 3D
  • HTC EVO 4G
  • HTC Sensation
  • HTC Wildfire S
  • HTC Incredible S
  • Droid Incredible 2
  • HTC Amaze 4G
  • HTC One X
  • HTC One S
  • HTC One V
  • HTC One XL
  • HTC Thunderbolt
  • HTC Desire HD
  • HTC Inspire 4G
  • HTC EVO Shift 4G
  • HTC Desire S
  • HTC Tattoo
  • Droid Eris
  • HTC Desire
  • HTC Incredible
  • HTC Wildfire
  • HTC Aria
  • HTC Desire Z
  • HTC EVO 4G+
  • HTC Vivid 4G
  • HTC EVO Design 4G
  • HTC Sensation XE
  • HTC Rezound
  • HTC Desire C

While the list is quite large, one must keep in mind that not all of these devices have S-Off, and users must have S-Off in order to actually use this application. To get started, visit the original thread.

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