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Posts Tagged: HTC One V

Sceenshot-CapButnBrightnessPro-1.0.11-1

Hardware capacitive buttons seem to be a love-it-or-hate-it affair. While many of us seem to prefer the versatility of the on-screen buttons most commonly seen on modern Nexus devices, others instead favor the increased usable screen real estate made possible by having dedicated keys outside of the display.

If you happen to own an HTC device, you are probably a fan of dedicated hardware buttons. But that’s not to say that you can’t tweak them to make them work better for you. XDA Senior Member denversc created an app called Capacitive Buttons Brightness, which does… Well, you guessed it. It allows you to change the brightness of your capacitive buttons.

Currently, the app officially supports the HTC One X (dual- and quad-core variants), HTC One X+, HTC One, and HTC One S. That said, many users have found that it also works on other devices such as the HTC One V, HTC Desire HD, HTC Evo 3D, Motorola Droid MAXX, and LG Optimus G.

The app allows you to change brightness in 3 steps: dim, bright, and off. The default on most Sense-based ROMs seems to be bright, whereas it is usually set to dim on most AOSP-based ROMs. Please note that the “off” setting does not work if you have the GV Integration app installed. Naturally, root access is required… But who here isn’t rooted anyway?

Make your way over to the application thread to get started. And if you wish to build from this app, head over to the project’s Google Code page.

PACman

Over the last month or so, we’ve brought you news of a new AOSP-based ROM making it’s way around the forums. It’s called PACman and it’s a kang of CyanogenMod, AOKP, and ParanoidAndroid all rolled into one. Users seem to be enjoying it because it’s been ported to a decent number of devices. Now, HTC One V owners can give it a try as well.

As with with most HTC One V ROM releases, this came as a pair. Both the GSM and CDMA versions have their own port, so no need to worry about one not being supported. XDA Forum Member inyourface09 released the ROMs to XDA, along with the help of many others. The feature list is pretty typical for this ROM, and includes some of the best features from CM10, AOKP, and ParanoidAndroid.

The ROMs are pretty stable as well. There are two lists of things not working. For CDMA, the bug list includes:

Volume is muted by default to fix this use the volume rocker after install
Pin unlock under Tablet mode is scaled wrong, hard to unlock phone
Im sure you’ll will find other issues

And for GSM:

Camcorder
Volume is muted by default to fix this use the volume rocker after install
Pin unlock under Tablet mode is scaled wrong, hard to unlock phone (Use Pattern 3×3-6×6)
Im sure you’ll will find other issues, if you do either PM me or post in this thread

So really, the only difference is that the camcorder isn’t working in GSM version. Since the volume issue isn’t really a bug, that means the only issue these ROMs deals with scaling, so this is definitely daily driver material.

For additional info, check out the CDMA thread or the GSM thread.

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Sense 4.1 Ported to HTC One V

November 2, 2012   By:

Sense41

How much an OEM supports its hardware is variable. Sometimes, they give frequent and timely updates. Other times, an update could take months or not happen at all. In the latter case, developers sometimes deliver an update much earlier than official release. HTC One V users have a chance to do that now with a full HTC Sense 4.1 port.

The ROM is a port from the HTC Desire S and contains a Sense 4.1-skinned build of Android 4.0.4. XDA Recognized Contributor shubhamchamaria has released the ROM for both the CDMA and GSM variants, so no matter which you’re running, you can take part. The full feature list includes:

Ported from Desire S
Full Sense 4.1
First Sense Rom with 4.0.4
Extra Music enhancers like Wow SRS, 5.1 Surround etc
All Sense 4.5 Skins working perfectly and added into the Rom
APM, EQS
Few useful apps included
All transitions of full sense
Weather animations
Leap view
Flip Clock
Proper 3D Rosie
Array of many Widgets of Full Sense

In terms of bugs, shubhamchamaria says they have all been squashed, so this is definitely daily driver material. There may be a few lurking about, but there should be nothing major wrong.

For more info, check out either the CDMA thread or the GSM thread.

TWRP

The last time we brought you news about TWRP, it was to announce that TWRP 2.2.2 had been released. It had fixed a lot of bugs from the initial release of TWRP 2.2 and added a few new features. Very recently, TWRP has been updated again to version 2.3.

There were a whole bunch of awesome improvements with TWRP 2.2 and a lot of unique and brand new features as well. TWRP 2.3 promises no less. The official change log includes:

Rebased onto AOSP Jelly Bean source code
Rewrote backup, restore, wipe, and mount code in C++ classes for easier maintenance going forward
NOTE: backups from prior versions of TWRP are still compatible with 2.3
ADB sideload functionality from AOSP is included in 2.3, see this link for more info
Re-wrote fix permissions entirely in C++ and runs in a few seconds instead of a few minutes (thanks to bigbiff)
Improvements to zip finding in OpenRecoveryScript (should be a lot fewer GooManager automation issues)
Faster boot times
Added charging indicator while in recovery (only updates once every 60 seconds)

Additionally, XDA Recognized Developer Dees_Troy has reported that there is now support for spaces in backup names. Before, if you added a space to the name of a backup, it would not restore. Now users can use whatever naming convention they want.

One of the biggest changes, though, is all of the TWRP being rewritten in C++ and its move to recovery API 3 instead of API 2. With the code rewrite, it will allow TWRP to update more quickly and with more stability. With the API 3 change, it means that some flashable zip files may stop working because the developer needs to update the update-binary. If you don’t want to wait for the developer, or the developer has ceased working on the project, you can find one to use on TWRP’s official website. To install the latest TWRP, you can use the Goomanager application. Simply open the application, hit menu, and install open recovery.

If you want to check out the latest TWRP recovery for your device, check one of the links below.

JBCM10

Very often, devices have multiple releases. It is not uncommon for the variants to have hardware differences, as is the case on the international HTC One X and the AT&T version. Often times, devices also feature different radios than their sibling device, as is the case with GSM and CDMA variants of the same phone. And since you generally can’t just flash one device’s development work on the other, there can be a gap at times between developer support on the devices. This doesn’t seem to be a problem for the HTC One V, as both versions have recently gotten unofficial ports of CyanogenMod 10. This is very much like when they got ICS Paranoid Android at the same time.

CyanogenMod 10 for the CDMA One V was released by XDA Recognized Contributor jmztaylor, while the GSM version is being handled by XDA Recognized Contributor Lloir. While there are different developers on each device, they’ve actually been working together along with a number of other developers and members to make the ROMs as stable as possible.

As we’ve been wont to point out, most Jelly Bean releases have been alphas or previews and haven’t been really stable enough for daily use. This is where the One V deviates, as both ROMs are surprisingly stable. Other than a few bugs here and there, the biggest issues reported have been the LCD backlight never turning off and the camcorder not working. Those are also the ones reported on just the CDMA version. If you don’t need camcorder and don’t mind the backlight issue, then these can be used daily. For more info, check out the CDMA One V thread or the GSM One V thread.

coolest logo ever

Paranoid Android is one of the more colorful ROMs that has been making its way around the forums in recent months. We’ve brought you news of the hybrid ROM coming out on several devices already, but the ROM seems to be heading everywhere. It is a very unique ROM, the first truly hybrid phone / tablet ROM experiences for most devices. Unlike ROMs that have tablet mode, ParanoidAndroid uses P.A.L. and P.A.D. (Per-App-Layout and Per-App-Density, respectively) to allow users to set each application’s DPI and layout.

The latest devices to get this unique ROM are the CDMA and GSM versions of the HTC One V. The first of the two versions to get it was the GSM version, posted by XDA Senior Member 1ceb0x, with the help of a few others. From there, XDA Forum Member salvy512 ported it to the CDMA version with the help of other members and devs.

Both ROMs are quite stable, with only a couple of issues. For the CDMA version, the only two things that don’t work properly are Bluetooth—which doesn’t work at all—and a notification light bug that only happens while the device is charging. For the GSM, the only issue is the Bluetooth issue. The reason for the Bluetooth issue is because it happens to be a bug on the local CM9 port, upon which the ROMs were based. Once CM9 gets Bluetooth fixes, the ParanoidAndroid ROMs should join the Bluetooth party as well. If you can handle not having Bluetooth, the ROMs are stable enough to use as daily drivers, and anyone who wants to check out the unique hybrid mode should definitely do so. It is pretty cool.

For additional info, check out the CDMA thread or the GSM thread.

Bootloader Customizer

Not too long ago, we brought you news that allowed HTC EVO 4G LTE users to customize their bootloaders. The process was pretty cool, allowing users to make their bootloader look however they want—including making it look unhacked. After the initial project was released, users clamored for this to be made available to more devices. The requests were heard and responded to. Now, the plugin has been made available to make the bootloader customizer for a number of HTC devices.

The process for a developer to port this is not hard. XDA Recognized Contributor regaw_leinad, who developed the application and plugin, takes a time out from the stags (yes, that’s really him) to explain how:

it’s basically all written, they just need to fill in the values for their hboot, and embed the hboot.img into the exe. I already have a placeholder for the hboot.img and android-info.txt so a drag and drop over them should keep it embedded.

Regaw_leinad is also creating the application for the supported devices, but wanted to release the plugin first so users had a chance to get it sooner. The current list of supported HTC devices include:

  • HTC EVO 4G LTE
  • HTC EVO 3D
  • HTC EVO 4G
  • HTC Sensation
  • HTC Wildfire S
  • HTC Incredible S
  • Droid Incredible 2
  • HTC Amaze 4G
  • HTC One X
  • HTC One S
  • HTC One V
  • HTC One XL
  • HTC Thunderbolt
  • HTC Desire HD
  • HTC Inspire 4G
  • HTC EVO Shift 4G
  • HTC Desire S
  • HTC Tattoo
  • Droid Eris
  • HTC Desire
  • HTC Incredible
  • HTC Wildfire
  • HTC Aria
  • HTC Desire Z
  • HTC EVO 4G+
  • HTC Vivid 4G
  • HTC EVO Design 4G
  • HTC Sensation XE
  • HTC Rezound
  • HTC Desire C

While the list is quite large, one must keep in mind that not all of these devices have S-Off, and users must have S-Off in order to actually use this application. To get started, visit the original thread.

filemanagerrenam

Just about three months ago, we brought you news that the Team Win Recovery Project had received a massive update to version 2.1. April’s release largely heralded the start of a new age in recoveries—where one would no longer have to deal with cumbersome menus, instead interacting with a very user-friendly GUI.

It wasn’t simply about the GUI either. In addition to bringing an unrivaled level of UI polish, TWRP 2.1 offered users many advanced features such as update.zip queuing, a basic file manager, and dual storage support for Nandroid backups. Additionally, TWRP added support for the open source scripting engine OpenRecoveryScript, which works in conjunction with the previously covered GooManager.

How do you follow up something as revolutionary as TWRP 2.1? With TWRP 2.2, of course. That’s how! The new release builds on the previous offering by delivering many recovery “firsts.” For starters, this is the first recovery to feature on on-screen keyboard. Why would you want such a thing? How about naming and renaming Nandroid backups! TWRP 2.2 is also the only recovery to split extremely large backups, allowing users to backup and restore /data partitions larger than the 2 GB FAT32 file size limit.

In the words of XDA Recognized Developer Dees_Troy:

- On-screen keyboard in recovery! — supports long press, backspace repeat, and swipe left deletes everything left of the cursor
- Name new backups and rename existing backups
- Rename files and folders in the file manager
- Pseudo-terminal emulator
- Support decrypting an encrypted data partition on Galaxy Nexus (enter password using keyboard)
- Backup archive splitting — allows backup and restore of data partitions larger than 2GB
- Simplified XML layout support between resolutions
- Added dual storage selection radio buttons to zip install, backup, and restore pages
- Improved zip install compatibility
- Updated update-binary source code
- Numerous small bug fixes and improvements

Eager to get started? I know I am. Head to the links below to obtain the appropriate version for your device:

HTC One V

One of the biggest and most important events for a newly released device is the release of the GPL-compliant kernel source code and of the stock ROM that was shipped with the device. There are a plethora of reasons why. Kernel developers can use the kernel source to create better kernels. Having a stock ROM, or in the case with HTC phones an RUU, allows users to return to fully stock should the need ever arise and help cure soft bricks if nothing else is working. It, like the kernel source, can also be used in developments on the phone and help port the ROM to other devices. Thus, the kernel source and RUU are both pivotal releases in development related to newly released devices.

The HTC One V just a fantastic start with XDA Forum Member pwelyn sharing the RUU and XDA Recognized Developer mdeejay posting news of the the kernel source. The development on the HTC One V has started off very slowly, but with things like kernel source being released and a stock RUU to play with, it is only a matter of time before more development gets under way in the form of a custom recovery, a host of ROMs, and custom kernels to flash. With the HTC One V being a part of the increasingly popular HTC One series devices, it’s also very likely that this could help in the development of other HTC One devices. Or even more likely, this will probably aid in development for similar HTC devices also rocking the Snapdragon S2.

Head over to the kernel source and RUU threads to get started.

TWIL2

This Week in Development, new comer Jordan covers all the exciting stories you need to know from the XDA-Developers forum. In addition to Android’s possibly inadvertent fail, he covers ROMs for the Samsung Galaxy Note and HTC One X, and HTC One V ROMs being ported to the Desire S and Desire HD. Jordan mentions the addition of a forum for the HTC One V. Additionally, XDA Elite Recognized Developer AdamOutler‘s CASUAL and Shelr articles are discussed. The strangely addictive Crazy Birds game and an Android VNC are covered, along with the accelerometer fix for the T-Mobile Galaxy SII

Check out the video below.

READ ON »

marquee-fallback

With all the excitement surrounding the launch of HTC’s flagship One X, One XL, and One S phones, it’s easy to forget that there are other phones in the HTC One lineup. Never fear, however, as we haven’t forgotten about HTC’s new chin-laden device.

While the 1.0 GHz single-core Qualcomm Snapdragon S2 may not pack the same punch as what’s found in its dual- and quad-core siblings and its 3.7″ WVGA screen doesn’t pack in a ridiculous number of pixels, the One V may very well offer the right combination of screen size, speed, build quality, and price for those who don’t demand the absolute bleeding edge in mobile technology. Plus, let’s not forget that that this phone comes loaded with Android 4.0 Ice Cream Sandwich and the thankfully subdued Sense 4.0—an update many HTC devices are still waiting for.

Head over to the newly created forum to get in on the discussion.

htc one v

With the release of new Android devices, it is inevitable for their software to get ported to other devices from the same OEM. We’ve brought you some of this recently with the Xperia S UI being ported to various older Xperia devices. With every new generation coming out, it’s going to end up on an older generation device, one way or another.

For the HTC Desire S, that time is now. XDA Senior Member proxuser has ported over a ROM from one of HTC’s newest offerings, the HTC One V. While the ROM is still a work in progress, there is a lot of promise with the ROM currently. To begin with, the official list of what’s working is longer than what isn’t working, and that is always a great sign. To be more specific, what isn’t working currently is only:

camera
wifi hotspot
usb tethering

So camera, hotspot and USB tethering. Considering what some devices go through with ports, that’s a phenomenal thing. With revision 3.3 only three weeks from release, it’s clear that proxuser is going to support this for quite some time.

The port for the HTC Desire HD is even closer to completion, as the same developer is working on the same port as well. For the time being, the only thing that isn’t working is the camera, so maybe getting hotspot and tethering fixed on that phone can bring some hope for Desire S users.

In any case, both of these ROMs are nearing completion, so Desire S and Desire HD users will soon be graced with the HTC One V goodies. Additional information, screen shots, a review video, change logs, feature list, credits and thank you list, and download links can be found in the Desire S and Desire HD threads.

desirehdonevport

The HTC One V’s similarities to its older brother, the Desire S, make  it ideal for developers to port ROMs between the devices. XDA Forum Member proxuser has come up with an Android 4.0.3 ROM sporting HTC Sense 4.0 for the Desire S and also the Desire HD.

One would assume that this ROM could be much heavier and less stable than stock because it is built for a more powerful device, but the developer assures us that this is simply not the case. In fact, he conjectures that this is the fastest and most stable ROM for the two devices. However, the ROM isn’t quite flawless. Fortunately, the list of things that work is much longer than the things that don’t. Currently, the main issues are the camera, WiFi hotspot, and SD card mounting functions.

Overall, the ROM seems to be good enough for day-to-day use for most people. Visit the Desire HD and Desire S threads for all information and download or check out a hands-on video to see how it looks.

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