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Posts Tagged: HTC One X

Soft Keys Ohhhhh Yeah

Most development work as of late has revolved around getting Jelly Bean onto various devices. As the rush of new Jelly Bean releases slows down, there are more and more mods for Jelly Bean being released. Granted, most of these are patches or fixes to issues on ROMs, but there are a few out there that contain theme elements or other miscellaneous tweaks. Now, HTC One X users running Jelly Bean have one to enable soft keys and disable capacitive buttons.

Created by XDA Senior Member kibaa12 with some help by Recognized Themer mattmanwrx, the mod is currently only compatible with CyanogenMod 10. It comes in the form of a custom recovery-flashable update.zip. Those wishing to revert simply need to flash the second file, which undoes all changes. Not all is perfect, though. As kibaa12 states:

HEADS UP: This Will Disable the Extra feature added in settings>system (tho once u have on screen why would you want to modify the hardware keys)

Glitch: pressing the disabled Capacative keys while trying to use touch on screen becomes unresponsive reverted the second you un touch the cap keys

These aren’t very big problems though. The screen freeze issue only occurs while the capacitive buttons are physically pressed, and it stops as soon as you stop touching the button. Otherwise, users have reported the mod working quite well.

For more details, check out the original thread.

CPU

A while back, we brought you news that the HTC One X wasn’t handling quite performing as well as expected in gaming. There was a tutorial created that explained why the One X was having issues and how to fix them. At the time of its release, the tutorial had a couple of methods to improve gaming performance manually. Now, there is an application available that does it automatically.

The application is called RENOVATE. Created originally by XDA Senior Member henk2484, the source code was sent to XDA Senior Member wilkyyyy who then ported it to the One X. Also in on the project was XDA Recognized Contributor hamdir, who wrote the tutorial for fixing the gaming issues.

RENOVATE is fairly simple to use. Once installed, users can enable or disable Gaming Boost mode. Once enabled, the application does a number of things. As wilkyyy explains:

…it sets all the cores to ondemand, tweaks the sampling rate, up threshold and sampling down factor, enables gpu frequency scaling, switches to the deadline scheduler and tweaks the mnfrees.

That’s quite a bit for one button press. Users have reported that it works quite well, although it does drain the battery quickly. A couple of reports have stated that the battery can be depleted in under an hour if the right game is being played. The game did not lag, though.

For more info, check out the application thread. It has also been added to hamdir’s tutorial, linked above.

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Bootloader Customizer

Not too long ago, we brought you news that allowed HTC EVO 4G LTE users to customize their bootloaders. The process was pretty cool, allowing users to make their bootloader look however they want—including making it look unhacked. After the initial project was released, users clamored for this to be made available to more devices. The requests were heard and responded to. Now, the plugin has been made available to make the bootloader customizer for a number of HTC devices.

The process for a developer to port this is not hard. XDA Recognized Contributor regaw_leinad, who developed the application and plugin, takes a time out from the stags (yes, that’s really him) to explain how:

it’s basically all written, they just need to fill in the values for their hboot, and embed the hboot.img into the exe. I already have a placeholder for the hboot.img and android-info.txt so a drag and drop over them should keep it embedded.

Regaw_leinad is also creating the application for the supported devices, but wanted to release the plugin first so users had a chance to get it sooner. The current list of supported HTC devices include:

  • HTC EVO 4G LTE
  • HTC EVO 3D
  • HTC EVO 4G
  • HTC Sensation
  • HTC Wildfire S
  • HTC Incredible S
  • Droid Incredible 2
  • HTC Amaze 4G
  • HTC One X
  • HTC One S
  • HTC One V
  • HTC One XL
  • HTC Thunderbolt
  • HTC Desire HD
  • HTC Inspire 4G
  • HTC EVO Shift 4G
  • HTC Desire S
  • HTC Tattoo
  • Droid Eris
  • HTC Desire
  • HTC Incredible
  • HTC Wildfire
  • HTC Aria
  • HTC Desire Z
  • HTC EVO 4G+
  • HTC Vivid 4G
  • HTC EVO Design 4G
  • HTC Sensation XE
  • HTC Rezound
  • HTC Desire C

While the list is quite large, one must keep in mind that not all of these devices have S-Off, and users must have S-Off in order to actually use this application. To get started, visit the original thread.

HTC One X Tool

Toolkits have been popping up left and right on XDA recently, and for good reason. They are generally very helpful and give users the ability to use a plethora of tools within the confines of a single application. Typically, most toolkits include basic features such as gaining root access, flashing a custom recovery, and unrooting. Some, however, include much more than that.

Now, the HTC One X has such a toolkit. The toolkit features range from common to unique and, based on version, include:

V1.0
Flash Kernels & Modules
Flash Recoveries
Reboot The Phone
Reboot Into Recovery/Bootloader
V1.1
Kernel Repack – Phone on Android with USB Debug Enabled – No Need For The Recovery
v1.2
MultiKernel Repack
Repacked output Format Kernel.Ramdisk.IMG
V1.3
One Click Root
V1.4
Reworked Module Flasher
Decreased/Removed some delays
Fixed Faux Module Unzipping Problem
V1.5
Added RUU Zip Flashing Ability – For Advanced Users

Developed by XDA Senior Member thunder07, the toolkit fills the usual niche of having one-click root and flashing recoveries. It also contains some unique features, such as kernel and module flashing and an RUU zip flashing utility. The broad utility of this toolkit makes it a must have for One X owners.

To learn more, head to the original thread.

filemanagerrenam

Just about three months ago, we brought you news that the Team Win Recovery Project had received a massive update to version 2.1. April’s release largely heralded the start of a new age in recoveries—where one would no longer have to deal with cumbersome menus, instead interacting with a very user-friendly GUI.

It wasn’t simply about the GUI either. In addition to bringing an unrivaled level of UI polish, TWRP 2.1 offered users many advanced features such as update.zip queuing, a basic file manager, and dual storage support for Nandroid backups. Additionally, TWRP added support for the open source scripting engine OpenRecoveryScript, which works in conjunction with the previously covered GooManager.

How do you follow up something as revolutionary as TWRP 2.1? With TWRP 2.2, of course. That’s how! The new release builds on the previous offering by delivering many recovery “firsts.” For starters, this is the first recovery to feature on on-screen keyboard. Why would you want such a thing? How about naming and renaming Nandroid backups! TWRP 2.2 is also the only recovery to split extremely large backups, allowing users to backup and restore /data partitions larger than the 2 GB FAT32 file size limit.

In the words of XDA Recognized Developer Dees_Troy:

- On-screen keyboard in recovery! — supports long press, backspace repeat, and swipe left deletes everything left of the cursor
- Name new backups and rename existing backups
- Rename files and folders in the file manager
- Pseudo-terminal emulator
- Support decrypting an encrypted data partition on Galaxy Nexus (enter password using keyboard)
- Backup archive splitting — allows backup and restore of data partitions larger than 2GB
- Simplified XML layout support between resolutions
- Added dual storage selection radio buttons to zip install, backup, and restore pages
- Improved zip install compatibility
- Updated update-binary source code
- Numerous small bug fixes and improvements

Eager to get started? I know I am. Head to the links below to obtain the appropriate version for your device:

Team Hex

Fastboot is one of the most powerful tools on any Android device. With it and ADB, you can literally flash, push, or pull anything from your rooted device. It is even useful for obtaining information that is otherwise difficult to get. Combine this functionality into the convenience of a one-click tool, and you’ve got a pretty solid piece of work that anyone should have. International HTC One X owners now have such a tool.

XDA Forum Member TeAm HeX has released the Automated Fastboot Commands tool for the HTC One X. The purpose of the tool is to allow users to flash things and obtain information using Fastboot commands quickly and easily. The features include:

Flash CWM Recovery
Flash CWM Recovery – USB/ADB Working
Boot CWM Recovery
Flash TWRP Recovery 2.1.2
Flash TWRP Recovery 2.1.6
Flash HTC Stock Recovery 1.28
Flash HTC Stock Recovery 1.29
Flash Interim Recovery
Flash Doom Recovery – Sort Of
Flash Boot.Img
Clear Cache
Relock Bootloader
Get CID
Get MID
Reboot – Normal
Reboot – Bootloader

This is something that every HTC One X owner can use. This is especially true for obtaining CID and MID info, as well as relocking the bootloader, as these are often required for other procedures.

To get started, head over to the original thread.

Kernel

The most common way to install a kernel is to flash it in a custom recovery. There are a couple of notable exceptions, but otherwise the process is pretty straightforward. However, some users may fall to a common malady known as laziness. Now, HTC One X users have an easy way of switching kernels.

XDA Senior Member maseo has created an installer for Windows PCs that will install a kernel from the computer instead of from recovery. While it unfortunately means that you must be connected to a PC, this makes switching kernels even easier than it was before by automating the entire process. The installer will push the kernel to your One X, reboot, and install the kernel.

It is pretty easy to use. Maseo has created a Dropbox folder with all the currently supported kernels. Users simply sync with their own Dropbox account or download all the supported kernels in a rar file. From there, it’s a matter of running the installer, selecting the kernel and watching as the kernel gets installed. This saves a lot of time as all the kernels are readily available whenever they’re needed. Unfortunately, the kernel installer is only supported for the Android Revolution HD ROM, and the app is only for Windows. However, maseo says:

For now it only works on Windows, with modified kernels for ARHD 7.x. Other roms and OS’s could be added if there’s enough interest.

So if you want this on another ROM or OS, don’t be afraid to ask. For further information, check out the original thread.

slide-1-white

Developers these days are fast. Many flagship devices are rooted before they’re even released to the general public for consumption. In the spirit of speed (and being amazing), XDA Senior Member tgascoigne has ported an initial release of Android 4.1 Jelly Bean to the international version of the HTC One X!

This very alpha release is based off of the GSM Galaxy Nexus Jelly Bean image, and so far:

Known issues
•Wifi
•Audio
•Camera
•Probably more

Remember this is an intial port, and there is a lot still to be done before this ROM is a daily driver. If you feel like you have what it takes to help out with this project, or you’re just looking to play with an intial port of Jelly Bean, head on over to the original thread and have a go. Stay tuned, because with all of the excitement around Google I/O and Jelly Bean rips flying around, there are bound to be other devices getting ports as well.

Terminal

Init.d has a special place in Android. With it, users can install scripts and mods to run at boot, and thus modify almost any aspect of the phone that they want. There are battery tweaks, performance tweaks, GPS tweaks, signal tweaks, and the list goes on and on. However for these scripts to work, the phone must first have init.d support. Typically, Ramdisks provide init.d support, but sometimes it is possible to gain init.d support without flashing a new Ramdisk, or even without altering the Ramdisk at all.

This is something that XDA Recognized Developer smokin1337 has been working on for a number of devices. With a mod called EZ InitD, smokin1337 looks to help users add init.d support easily. Additionally, the developer gives a couple of options on how to use the mod. One version is for users to flash via custom recovery, while the other is for ROM developers to include in their ROMs. The best part is, it’s simple.

After the mod is applied, anything in your init.d folder will run on boot, as it normally would. In the ROM developer version, developers can actually change the directory to whatever they want. In other words, there could be ROMs made with init.d support but without an actual init.d folder. (Ed: I’m thinking /etc/NyanCat or /etc/bacolicious, myself.) The method has been tested on the HTC One S and the HTC One X, but it should actually work on any device. As many users will tell you, init.d support comes from the Ramdisk. This is not necessarily true. According to smokin1337:

This mod will add init.d support to any rom even stock roms without editing the ramdisk. Instead it uses the post_boot.sh file that is in most if not all roms. It should work on most devices, if it does not work on yours please look in /system/etc and post the name of the file that contains “post_boot.sh”.

So, given this method, it’s actually possible to gain init.d support without switching, editing or otherwise touching the Ramdisk or kernel. For additional information, check out the original thread.

SmartSync

By now everyone is aware of the HTC One X signal issues. What started as a grassroots movement here on XDA has blown up into users finding that they have an issue and coming together to do something about it. However, the hardware is not the only issue causing WiFi signal problems. There is also a software version causing much the same malady for HTC One X that is killing WiFi and data signal and not letting it come back.

The problem is that between the hours of midnight and 7AM, the phone goes into what is called SmartSync Mode. This mode disables the WiFi and Data connections after 15 minutes of inactivity to save the user battery. The issue is that it doesn’t turn back on until a user physically uses the device. This can cause a number of issues through the night, as users won’t receive emails or updates on any applications during this time frame if SmartSync has kicked on. For users who depend on their smartphones to be always available for communication, this can be a serious problem.

XDA Recognized Developer j4n87 has developed an application that will turn this feature off entirely. It’s very simple and easy to use. The best part? It works for non-rooted and bootloader locked phones. So no one needs to break warranty in order to fix this problem. Furthermore, some users may mistakenly believe they have the hardware problem when they actually have this software issue instead, which can be easily fixed without performing difficult hardware modifications.

For more information, check out the original thread.

DSP

DSP Manager, the well known music equalizer application usually found in CyanogenMod ROMs, has made its way around as a standalone application for some time. While it’s been around for a while, it’s still one of the premier equalizer applications for Android and it’s a welcome addition to any device.

DSP Manager is now available on the Samsung Galaxy S III, and is possibly compatible with many, many other devices. Brought to the device by XDA Senior Member apascual89 from the HTC One X section, users may be alarmed when the installation process mentions HTC’s flagship phone. However, this is normal because the recovery-flashable update.zip contains all the required libraries that should make this app compatible with a great deal of devices.

For more information, check out the Galaxy S III thread. If you have an HTC One X, you can find more info in the HTC One X thread.

One X rooted

The HTC One X has had its share of problems with some hardware issues and lawsuits. Along with the rough debut and hardware issues, another problem facing HTC One X users is rooting the latest firmware. The current method requires users to downgrade their firmware, then root. This process can take some time and can be potentially dangerous if something flashes incorrectly. The One X now has a root method for the 1.85 firmware, but users are advised to use it quickly because the door could be closed at any minute.

The exploit was posted by XDA Senior Member beaups and is only usable for the AT&T and Rogers version of the One X. As stated, the root method will likely not last forever, as beaups states:

THIS EXPLOIT MAY NOT LAST FOREVER. ATT COULD SHUTDOWN UPDATE SERVERS OR SOMETHING ALONG THOSE LINES AND KILL THIS. DO IT NOW.

This is because during the method, users are to check for updates on their phone. This gives the device a file called local.prop, which is essential for the root method to work. Aside from the time sensitive nature, the root method itself is easy and pretty basic. Simply download a few files and carefully type in some commands and that Superuser box pops up in no time.

The full method, download links, and additional information can be found in the original thread

HTC

Following the release of HTC’s flagship One series, owners have begun to notice some early inconveniences—things not working quite like they should, and the phone having issues with things that shouldn’t be an issue. With the quality control of HTC already in question, XDA Senior Member bigoliver has decided to showcase one of the biggest hardware faults of the HTC One X. It’s a pretty bad one too.

Some One X users have been struggling with signal strength, particularly WiFi signal strength, where a few have even experienced complete signal drops. Sadly this results froman issue with the antenna of the HTC One X. As bigoliver explains:

However this thread is specificity for the confirmed (by the community & unfortunately me) hardware fault of a lose connection on the WIFI antenna.

If you are suffering from a really bad WIFI connection and think you may have this hardware fault, there is a simple test you can do.

The squeeze test

Gently squeeze the side back of your phone, between the camera lens and the volume buttons, if your WIFI signal strength improves only to drop back down when you stop squeezing then you have this seemingly common fault.

What follows is quite astounding. After the explanation of the problem, the rest of the thread is dedicated to helping fellow members identify whether or not they have the problem, and their options regarding what they can do about it. Thus far, there are an astounding 9 video tutorials on how to tear down the One X and fix it yourself—which should be done with the utmost caution as you can permanently break your phone this way—along with some rumored methods that could fix it. Most impressively, there’s an HTC representative monitoring the activity in the thread and doing what he can to help people out.

Additionally, bigoliver is using the thread to help track users’ communications to HTC to keep track of what they intend to do in order to fix the problem. What started out as a friendly thread to let users know that there’s a problem has ballooned into a full blown movement of people helping people to get things fixed. We couldn’t be more proud.

For much more information, head on over to the original thread and get the help your One X needs.

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