• 5,605,668
    REGISTERED
  • 49,114
    ONLINE NOW

Posts Tagged: htc rezound

htcdev_peterchou

Today, Peter Chou makes good on his word to no longer lock the bootloaders on HTC Android phones.  Just in time for those New Year’s Resolutions.

XDA Junior Member nightwings noticed, when trying out HTCDev’s bootloader unlocking tool on his HTC Rezound, his bootloader was successfully unlocked.  Similar reports came in on the HTC Vivid forum, even though neither were named on HTCDev.com’s list of supported devices.

And it’s bigger than just the HTC Rezound and Vivid.  I just tried out the tool on the HTC Rhyme.  I asked RussellHolly to try it on his HTC Thunderbolt.  We now both have unlocked bootloaders.  With the backing of an unnamed source at HTC, I feel comfortable going out on a limb to say at least every device released after HTCDev launched is now supported by their bootloader unlocking tool.  Scratch that, HTCDev just posted this:

All HTC Android devices launched after September 2011 are unlockable. The website will be updated accordingly to reflect this in the coming weeks. We continue to work on models launched prior to September 2011, please check back often for the status of older devices.

For now, head over to HTCDev to unlock your device.  If you find that your device doesn’t unlock, let us know so we can get a clear picture of how far the unlocking goes.

Congratulations to all persistent consumers who knew what they wanted.  And congratulations to HTC and HTCDev for making it happen.  We know it wasn’t easy.

HTC-Rezound

A little boot-looping on your brand new HTC Rezound got you down? Well, it’s time to turn that frown upside down because there’s now a fix for it.

XDA Senior Member jayochs has released a how-to on getting the boot loops stopped without requiring a factory reset. Initially, no one knew what caused the boot loops but after some digging, it was found out that it was network-related. jayoch says:

*#*#4636#*#* Under phone info you will find that the network is factory set to WCDMA Preferred… I guess the SIM card decides sometime along the way that it doesn’t like that much… Setting the network to CDMA EVDO/LTE – Auto completely corrects the problem

Oh those silly SIM cards, when will they learn? If you’re having some HTC Rezound boot-looping woes and need some help fixing it, you can find a complete set of instructions, explanations and even a nifty little Android app that will get you to the phone menu without needing to type codes into the phone dialer right here in the original thread . If the fix happens not to work, there’s a plethora of other methods in the user comments to try out as well. There’s more than one way to skin a cat, the old saying goes.

Advertisment
ct2.1

Owners of the HTC Rezound who want to clean up the bloat on their Android devices should check out CleanTOOL – a script written by XDA Recognised Developer scrosler. The script uses temp root to disable most bloat and the bloat will not come back on reboot. Note that the bloat will come back upon hard reset.

Of course, since not all the bloat that the script removes may be considered bloatware by everyone, the dev has helpfully detailed how to modify the script to not remove some of the apps.

For a full list of bloat removed, and instructions on how to modify the script, head on over to the application thread where you can download CleanTOOL.

I wrote an article two days ago slating HTCdev and their tardiness in GPL compliance. I was harsh and unforgiving, and quite right too. We’re not here to play devil’s advocate or apologise on their behalf. The article listed phones the kernel source code hadn’t been published for. Some devices remain unpublished, but a small collection have been published today, including the Rezound, Amaze, Explorer, and Desire S.

Well done, HTC, hopefully we’ll see full GPL compliance soon. Please visit www.htcdev.com to download your required resources.

mount

This one is more directed to devs and cooks out there than anyone else. It seems that XDA member xboxexpert has been able to fully identify the mount points in the memory map for the HTC Rezound. Basically, what this does is to let a kitchen or a rom builder know where everything is located and how much space is available to flash something. Every piece of memory inside of the device has a specific location and knowing which location this is basically enables you to flash a rom in the correct partition, a kernel in the correct partition, etc.

The dev, due to not having a device with him at this point, was unable to provide the sizes for each part of the map. However, we are certain that once this device becomes more available to people, all the missing gaps will be filled in. If you are using a kitchen like XDA Senior Moderator’s dsixda, you will need to update the script manually with the values provided. XDA Recognized Developer JoelZ9614 does this in a post in the second page of the thread.

So, what are you waiting for? If you were simply waiting for this to start cooking, get to it!

$ mount
mount
rootfs / rootfs ro,relatime 0 0
tmpfs /dev tmpfs rw,relatime,mode=755 0 0
devpts /dev/pts devpts rw,relatime,mode=600 0 0
proc /proc proc rw,relatime 0 0

You can find more information in the original thread.

Want something published in the Portal? Contact any News Writer.

HTC-Rezound-300x265

It looks like full steam ahead was given the moment the HTC Rezound got a home here on xda. Things could not be more active at this point. Several devs have already gotten down and dirty working on getting this device ready for the masses by the time they get it. For instance, XDA member drellisdee just released a Recovery Image for this device that is completely based upon the immensely successful AmonRa recovery, which was available for devices such as the EVO 4G and others. Going into this, you will be able to do all the things that you love and are used to such as flash, back up and restore, messing with partitions either in ext3 or ext4 format, and much more.

The installation of this must be done via fastboot due to this device currently being unlockable via HTCDev only. Because of this, the boot partition is locked and must have the boot.img flashed via this method. The Revolutionary team is rumored to be working on making this device compatible with their unlocking app (although these are just rumors), but for the time being, the only available way is via HTC’s service. Please share your experiences with this new Recovery if you managed to get it installed.

Recovery Features:

ADB as root user

USB-MS Toggle :mounts sdcard or internal_sd as mass storage

You can find more information in the original thread.

Want something published in the Portal? Contact any News Writer.

logo

As we said last time, we are getting closer to the all mighty holiday (shopping) season and because of that we will likely see a flurry of new devices coming at us from all different directions. Several manufacturers started this game a tad early, HTC and Samsung to be more precise. However, there are a few odd manufacturers who will release new devices in order to stay competitive, even if you don’t expect them to. Barnes & Noble is one such company. They just released a brand new device into their already famous Nook family of devices. This time, the Nook Color received a big brother dubbed as the Nook Tablet, which boasts a dual core 1 GHz processor, 1 GB of RAM, 16 GB of on board storage, and a low glare, quasi-180º viewing angle screen capable of 1080 playback. This neat piece of technology is aimed to be a direct competitor to the Kindle Fire by Amazon. Let’s see who wins this race.

On other news, HTC released a new Verizon device named HTC Rezound, which aside from being similar to the Sensation XE in a few areas such as the 1.5 GHz dual core processor, this one comes loaded with much heavier specs in other departments such as a boost to 1 GB of RAM, and 16 GB of internal storage. However, the biggest feature on this device is the HD (not qHD but actual HD) Super LCD screen with resolution of 1280×720, which really is a first for any mobile phone out there.

Last but not least, we also added a new forum for the HTC Vivid. This device is pretty much up to par with the Rezound in most departments with the exception of the screen resolution (not that a qHD screen is a bad thing). However, what it doesn’t have in the resolution department, it makes up in size. The Vivid offers a slightly larger screen at 4.5 inches (as opposed to 4.3 on the Rezound). So, if you needed an excuse to get out of your old Inspire 4G, now you got one.

If you already have any of these devices or are planning on getting one (or all 3), make sure that you visit the new fora for up to date news, hacks, tips, and more.

You can visit the Nook Tablet forums here.

You can visit the Vivid forums here.

You can visit the Rezound forums here.

Want something published in the Portal? Contact any News Writer.

razr_rezound_nexus

I was thinking about the HTC Rezound today.  I do that sometimes–sit down and let my thoughts wander. I thought about its three-way fight within Verizon against the Samsung Galaxy Nexus and Motorola Droid RAZR, and how it will fare this Christmas season.  I also thought about TrevE’s work on HTC’s astounding Carrier IQ screw-up. And I came up with a target market based on privacy and security to whom no manufacturer has managed to sell phones yet:  the hopeless-paranoid.

See, on one extreme, there’s the non-paranoid.  These people either think they have everything under control or don’t care if they have control.  They’re the ones who buy crappy phones on contract.  They have no interest in phones, it’s just something they use and could easily afford at the moment.

At the opposite extreme, there’s the empowered-paranoid.  These are developers and other early adopters who use independent development.  They constantly seek the best phones either because it shouldn’t have the flaws of crappier phones, or because, if it does have problems, they can do something about it and not feel like they’re wasting time developing for sub-par hardware.

If we imagine a square to give a two-dimensional range to my envisioned market, in another corner are the paranoid-curious.  These people don’t worry too much, but their brains pump out thoughts often enough that they can at least spare a few to consider the advice of developers and early adopters.  That means worrying about privacy and security to some degree.  They buy higher-end phones because the empowered-paranoid–who are, again, developers and early adopters–encourage it.

Then there’s the hopeless-paranoid.  These people have all the security and privacy concerns of developers, yet feel they have no way to correct it.  Which phones do they buy?  They don’t.  The only thing they know to do when they’re worried about their privacy is to avoid the thing that makes them worry.  They aren’t worried about specific security issues–they don’t actually know enough to worry like that.  They’re worried about everything.  They say things like, “I don’t want people to be able to call me no matter where I am.”   We’ve all heard lines like that, and we all know it’s silly.  If you don’t want to talk to people at a certain time, turn off your phone.  No, they’re worried about more than being so accessible.

Now, you may be asking, is there actually any reason to be paranoid?  I guess that depends.  I reread some of the articles egzthunder1 wrote covering all TrevE’s amazing work exposing the dirty little secrets of HTC and the carriers.  And while he focuses on HTC phones, make no mistake that other manufacturers are doing the same.

Nevermind the security flaws that allow any app with Internet access to intercept the data that Carrier IQ, HTCLogger, etc. collect.  HTC and the carriers collect enough data to know pretty much everything about your phone habits.  Verizon changed their privacy policy to say that while you can opt out of letting them sell your information to other companies, they’re still collecting and keeping that data.  And Sprint… Sprint doesn’t even let you opt out.  They’re giving away information about you to whomever they like.  That could be companies.  That could be law enforcement.  You don’t get to say who they give it to, you don’t get to say what information they give, and you don’t get to say that they cannot collect it.

So yes, I think paranoia is justified.  And thank goodness for all the developers that work so hard to strip Carrier IQ and their ilk from ROMs.  To a certain extent, thank goodness for the manufacturers and carriers that openly support development by not locking down devices.  To the carriers and manufacturers who try to keep us from developing their devices, let me introduce you to the above four target markets.  I suggest you change your minds.  To HTC specifically, we see how developer-friendly you’re trying to be, but we see your devotion to carriers like Verizon more.  You need to decide that Peter Chou lied and bootloaders will not be unlocked, or you need to stand up for yourselves.

There is a point to all this.  As I said, I was thinking about the HTC Rezound, announced last week.  And since it’s on Verizon, its bootloaders will probably be locked.  That’s a clear move to prevent development.  So do something for me:  pretend the bootloader can’t be unlocked through exploits.  We can’t get S-Off, we can’t get root, no custom bootloader, no custom kernels or custom ROMs.  To put it simply, developers can’t develop.  All that paranoia and nothing can be done about it.

Which of those four groups of people does that sound like?  That’s right.  The hopeless-paranoid.  The people who don’t buy phones.  Except, in this case, they don’t buy your phones.  The only difference is, developers influence the buying habits of that large group of paranoid-curious people. The HTC Rezound?  Great specs.  Too bad the bootloader won’t be unlocked.  And doubly too-bad, HTC, that you made the Rezound exclusively for Verizon, the US carrier certain to get the Samsung Galaxy Nexus.

Merry Christmas, HTC.  Perhaps you’ll remember us in your New Years resolutions.

Advertisement

XDA TV: Most Recent Video

Buy/Sell on Swappa