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Posts Tagged: Logcat

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What ties together logcat and Holo UI? Possibly not much, as logcat is just a output of hundreds of processes running deep inside the phone, and Holo is an Android UI paradigm present since Honeycomb. It’s hard to find a connection between these two things, but there is one: a holo-fied logcat application made by XDA Recognized Contributor Quinny899.

The application doesn’t differ greatly from the original CatLog, but a few things have been changed to make the application even more efficient. The top search and action bar were removedm, and ActionView method was replaced by ActionBar. The application was heavily redesigned in terms of UI and looks in order to be totally different from its predecessor. Logs are now presented in the dark Holo style. Even the app’s themes were redesigned.

Holofied CatLog becomes one of the most interesting and good looking applications for debugging on Android devices. If you are not familiar with the ADB version of tool, this application is a must-have on your phone.

Is your phone is unresponsive or buggy? Help the developer of your ROM by posting a logcat. And if you need help doing so, CatLog is a tool for you. The application can be found in the original thread, and should work with Android 3.0 or greater.

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Logcat is a powerful diagnostic tool designed to help developers with debugging errors in their applications. Without it, fixing most of applications would be significantly more difficult. However, it appears that logcat is not the only diagnostic tool available to app developers.

Now, there is an alternative tool ported by XDA Senior Member alireza7991. STrace is a debugging utility to monitor a program’s system calls or signals it receives. Unlike logcat, Strace can be used to monitor a single application, so it’s much easier to find abnormal behavior. This tool can then be used to find causes for crashes or anomalies.

Using STrace is really simple. All you need to do is to push the bin file to /system/bin/ on your device and set the correct permissions with chmod. Then, you can run it from terminal emulator or ADB shell.

If you are interested in a new piece of debugging software, make your way to the utility thread and learn more about STrace.

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As we’ve mentioned before, there are no shortage of options available when it comes to logging what your device is doing. Whether it’s for the purpose of debugging or reporting an issue and you want to grab a log via PC or straight from the device, your options are myriad. If you prefer to use an application on the device itself to see exactly what’s going on, here’s a little something that you might just want to check out.

Logcat Extreme, by XDA Recognized Developer xdaid is an Android-based logcat tool that brings a few extra things to the table. It offers all of the features you would expect as standard such as live viewing with the ability to pause / resume / record, sharing logs, filtering, log searching, and kernel debug message viewing. Logcat Extreme also has a couple of useful features that you might not expect. The first is aimed at developers and allows them to trigger the application via the Android intent system, directly from their applications. The second allows you to float the logcat over whatever you are currently doing, in it’s own separate and resizable window, while still being able to quickly and easily adjust the settings on the fly.

If this sounds like it might be of use to you, head on over to the application thread for more information.

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If you’ve ever spent any amount of time using a beta version of an application or flashing the latest “bleeding edge” firmwares to your device, it is highly likely that you will have been asked to submit a logcat when reporting a bug. In fact some would say that you haven’t actually reported a bug until you have submitted a logcat.

While pulling a log and sending it on to a developer is not a difficult process, it can be cumbersome enough to discourage people from coming up with the relevant reports. This can be particularly frustrating for a developer if they are unable to reproduce the bug themselves. XDA Recognized Themer majdinj put together a Windows-based tool called AIO Logcat Manager, which makes the process simple and manageable for everyone from experienced users to those pulling their first log.

AIO Logcat Manager allows you to select from various types of logs to record, from a complete rundown of the system, error/fatal level, radio, kernel and process specific logcats. This allows you to quickly and easily filter the specific information you require. You are also able to collect the reports to a specific location and view them directly from the utility itself.

Check out the original thread for more information on AIO Logcat Manager and remember, logcat or GTFO.

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If you’re an Android user, there’s really almost no reason why you shouldn’t have some basic knowledge on how to use ADB and pull a logcat. After all, what better way is there to give back to the developers that help make our mobile devices better than by giving them the tools they need to diagnose issues effectively whenever they arise? And while most casual users have used the Dalvik Debug Monitor Service to take screenshots before the feature was officially added to the stock Android UI, there’s much more that can be done with the tool.

By now, you should be no stranger to the importance of logcat. We’ve covered the topic quite a few times in the past with various tools to help you help devs looking to troubleshoot their applications. However, even with tools at your disposal, it’s always nice to know how to do the same process manually. The same can be said about ADB knowledge in general. It’s just plain useful to have, and something we’d highly recommend around here. And the ability to do so manually is the extra icing on the cake.

In this spirit, XDA Senior Member -MR.WORLDWIDE- has created a simple and introductory- to intermediate-level guide to help you accomplish all of the tasks listed above. The guide is focused towards Windows users, and it covers topics ranging from installing the Java JDK and the Android SDK, all the way to actually connecting via ADB, pulling a logcat, and using DDMS for various monitoring-related tasks. Regarding ADB commands, sample commands are given that will teach you how to accomplish tasks such as installing and uninstalling an APK from your local computer, pushing and pulling devices to and from your device, and using adb shell to access your device via command line.

Head over to the guide thread to get started

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