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Posts Tagged: Moto E

Moto E

Ever since it was announced and released earlier this year, the affordable and powerful Moto E has been embraced by a very active community here and hence has seen much development. Of course, this is also due to the open nature towards aftermarket support Motorola has given it, as seen with gestures such as the prompt release of the device’s kernel source and Motorola’s official method of unlocking the bootloader. With so much to play with, it is without a doubt that plenty of folks here have went out and gotten a Moto E for themselves, and if you find yourself a new owner of the device, the ‘all-in-on’ Moto E beginner’s guide is a great way to get things started.

Written by XDA Senior Member neo.ank, the tutorial is a very comprehensive rundown of all the basics and more that you’ll want to know about the device and how to mod it. This includes topics such as:

  • ADB and fastboot
  • Bootloader
  • Rooting and custom recovery
  • Flashing custom ROMs
  • Updating your device
  • Troubleshooting

If such lingo and jargon do not seem familiar to you, the tutorial does a great job explaining what they are, as well as provide convenient links to helpful sites which may contain more resources and information.

A tutorial written with the beginner in mind, it is definitely worth checking out if you are new to the device and the aftermarket development community. So if you want to get started, head over to the Moto E primer guide thread.

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The Moto G, which was released back in 2013, has seen great success. The cheap and powerful device almost immediately found its way into the pockets of many XDA users around the world. Lenovo, after purchasing Motorola, decided to release an even more budget-friendly successor, the Moto E.

The Moto E’s firmware is close to AOSP, but in contrast to Nexus devices, the device tree wasn’t released. A while ago, we talked about a device tree by XDA Recognized Developers JackpotClavin and cybojenix. We’re pleased to announce that the whole process has gone well, and you can now try source-built Android in two flavors: Slim and CyanogenMod. This is possible thanks to cybojenix, who previously rooted the device and ported a TWRP recovery to this awesome smartphone. The ROM is pretty stable as an initial release. The only thing that still needs some polishing is mobile data.

These two ROMs are very close to stock. Cybojenix didn’t convert it to CAF, in order to keep it as close to stock as possible. The device tree is not yet pushed, but as promised, you all will have a chance to port some other ROMs pretty soon.

If you own a Moto E, make your way to the CyanogenMod or SlimKat threads to experience some custom ROM goodies.

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Motorola released two very successful devices last year: the Moto G and Moto X. Both were (and still are) great smartphones in their respective categories. And by releasing the G, Motorola showed other OEMs that good devices don’t have to be very expensive. Not too long ago, Motorola released the even more wallet friendly Moto E, which is poised to conquer the developing markets.

Right after the Moto E’s release, XDA Recognized Developer cybojenix managed to root it and create a custom recovery. Nearly a month later, there is quite a bit of work that has been done to bring source-built ROM goodness to Moto E. XDA Recognized Developers JackpotClavin and cybojenix are working on device and kernel tree for the “condor.” Quite a lot of progress has been made thus far, including functional audio, wireless connectivity, sensors, and video recording. No user-flashable build hasn’t been released just yet, but if you want to try out a custom ROM on your Moto E, you can now build an instance of CyanogenMod or AOSP by more easily.

You can follow the progress and offer your assistance in bringing up the device tree by visiting the original thread.

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Folks, it looks like Good Guy Moto is at it again! Just yesterday, we covered the launch of Android 4.4.3, and today we took a look at the latest version of KitKat what exactly has changed in 4.4.3. Also earlier today, the update started making its way out to the WiFi-only version of the Nexus 7 (2013). Now, we’ve got some great news for Moto device owners, as Motorola has just announced that it will begin rolling out Android 4.4.3 to the Moto X, Moto G, and Moto E.

You may recall that just a little while ago, Motorola Mobility was acquired by Chinese computer manufacturer Lenovo. This naturally led many to wonder whether Googorola’s trademark timely updates would then be passed along to Motonovo. Well, judging from today’s announcements, any potential fears have been allayed.

Understandably, not every device in every region will receive the update immediate. But starting today, as stated by Motorola, the OEM will begin rolling out Android 4.4.3 to the following devices:

  • Moto X T-Mobile users
  • Moto G users who bought online in the U.S. (includes Moto G 4G LTE) and at retail in Brazil
  • Moto E users who bought online in the U.S. For Moto E users, you are still up for the next major Android update as well. Consider this the cherry on top.

We don’t have any captured update OTAs, but we’ll be sure to update you when they pop up. Good job Motorola, this is the way to keep your customers happy!

[Source: Official Motorola Blog, Motorola Updates Portal | Many thanks to XDA Portal Supporter Titokhan for the tip!]

condor

We’ve talked quite a bit about the highly affordable Moto E ever since its launch earlier this month. We first shared a system dump a little under two weeks ago, and that was quickly followed by a preliminary TWRP build. Then two days after that, Motorola graciously allowed us to bootloader unlock the device.

Despite all of this early progress, one thing had been missing up until now, and that’s functional kernel source. Now, however, Motorola has finally complied with the GPL-requirements and released the open source kernel code for the Moto E.

Ordinarily, we wouldn’t be celebrating an OEM for taking a half month in releasing something that should have been available at device launch. But as you would expect, this is still a great thing for developers, who now no longer have to rely on code from other devices to create development work on the E. In addition to the kernel source release for the Moto E, Motorola has also updated its Razr M and Razr HD to match its KitKat updates that we saw not too long ago–again, better late than never.

Developers, it’s time to get those engines started. Head over to the source links below to get in on the source-built development action.

[Source: Motorola GitHubCondor Instructions | Via Motorola Blog]

moto3

We’ve talked quite a bit about the recently released Moto E in the past week. From its official launch to a system dump, root, and unofficial TWRP recovery, the device has had an active start. And thanks to its incredibly low, unsubsidized price point, relatively decent specs, and hallmark Motorola support, it’s no big surprise that many consumers and developers have shown interest in the device.

Now, yet another milestone has been reached on the E. This is of course official bootloader unlock courtesy of Motorola. This move should come as no surprise to Motorola aficionados, as the former Google subsidiary has shown aftermarket developers quite a bit of love in the past year. As such, various other Motorola devices such as the highly regarded Moto X and G, as well as the Droid RAZR HD, M, and Atrix have also been given official bootloader unlock support. However, this is the first time we’ve seen this type of support from any OEM for such a “low end” device.

It’s great to see that through allowing bootloader unlock and giving us timely updates that Motorola is giving consumers what they want. Now, let’s get some GPL-mandated kernel source so the REAL development for the E can begin! Head over to the source link below to get in on the bootloader unlock action.

[Source: Motorola Bootloader Unlock Program | Via PocketNow]

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It’s been a short while since Motorola, now owned by Lenovo, announced the Moto E. In many ways, the E is quite similar to the extremely popular Moto G thanks to its affordable price point and great user experience. This cheap, but capable good device may well become a big success.

The Moto E was launched with a near stock Android firmware and an unlockable bootloader. And soon, the custom ROM madness will arrive, since a system dump was just released by XDA Senior Member Saumitra Yadav. But the above isn’t the end of today’s good news for Moto E users. XDA Recognized Developer cybojenix managed to port TWRP to the “Condor,” which is the Moto E’s code name. And since a working TWRP build allows users to flash SuperSU or other root brokering applications, root has also been achieved.

It’s not entirely necessary to flash TWRP in order to gain root access. If you prefer to keep your stock recovery, just boot TWRP using fastboot and flash SuperSu. Since this TWRP build is an initial release and Motorola hasn’t yet released kernel source, some things don’t work. Luckily, the list is short and contains only two major issues. For starters, touch support while in recovery doesn’t work until the device is put to sleep and woken up again. Also, you cannot write to the SD Card.

If you are looking to root your Moto E, visit this thread. Recovery and an initial device tree can be found in the here.

 

 

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You may recall that we recently added a forum here on XDA for the Moto E. Following up on the highly regarded and wallet-friendly Moto G, the Moto E manages to undercut the G on price, while still offering competent specs capable of delivering a great user experience. Naturally given the device’s performance/price ratio, it is destined to become a crowd favorite here—both for developers and end users. And what do people do with popular devices? Mod them to hell and back, of course!

Although we highly encourage source-built modification whenever possible, many enjoy creating ROMs or mods from existing OEM firmware. For those looking to go down this road for the Moto E, a necessary starting point involves obtaining a system dump. And thanks to XDA Senior Member Saumitra Yadav, anyone looking to modify the stock ROM on the E or port some of its goodies to other devices can now begin their journey. Then, Portal Supporter MihirGosai also decided to help out by providing an additional mirror for the firmware.

If you’re looking to modify the E or want to get in on the porting action, you can get started by visiting the original thread.

[Many thanks to XDA Portal Supporter MihirGosai for the tip!]

XDA Forums for the LG G Watch, Samsung Gear Live, and Asus Padfone X

We recently added a few forums for some upcoming devices from LG and Motorola. First up is Motorola’s offering. Back near the tail end of last year, Motorola released the highly regarded (and budget friendly) Moto G. What made this device special wasn’t its spec sheet or its hardware design, but rather the fact that Motorola could produce a wallet-friendly device worth truly wanting. Now, Motorola has followed up on the G by unveiling the even more affordable Moto E. While technically offering low end specifications such as a dual-core 1.2 GHz Snapdragon 200 processor, a single gig of RAM, and a qHD (not to be confused with QHD) display, the E still manages to pack a relatively untouched UI, Android 4.4.2, and a promise of expedient future updates—all in a device that will run just $129 off contract.

Next up, we have LG’s offerings. We’ll start with the upcoming LG G3, which will formally be announced later this month. The G3 is LG’s next generation flagship device, following up on last year’s popular LG G2, which also served as the foundation for the smash hit Google Nexus 5. Not much is known for sure about the G3′s specifications, but most rumors point to a 5.5-inch QHD (not qHD) panel with a 534 ppi pixel density, LG’s 2.2/1.7 GHz octa-core Odin processor (though some leaks also point at a Snapdragon 801), and perhaps even a fingerprint reader. Finally, we also added a forum for the LG L3 II, L5 II, L7 II, and L9 II, which build upon last year’s modestly priced LG L3, L5, and L7.

Are you eyeing any of the above as your next device? Have the Moto E‘s relatively untainted Android experience, decent specifications, and amazing price won you over? Or is the flagship LG G3 more your fancy? What about the LG L3 II, L5 II, L7 II, and L9 II? Let us know in the comments below, and head over to the newly created forums to get in on the action.

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