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Posts Tagged: Motorola Defy Mini

Motorola-DEFY-MINI-Review-03-screen

The Motorola Defy Mini is a relatively popular device, despite not featuring flagship-level specifications. However, development for the XT320/XT321 hasn’t been what one would expect from such a popular device, and its locked bootloader is largely to blame. This has resulted in the inability to boot custom kernels—until now, that is.

The last time we talked about the Defy Mini, we covered how XDA Senior Member rootdefyxt320 was able to use a loophole to bring back traditional fastboot mode by flashing an older bootloader. Now, rootdefyxt320 is at it again (along with help from MauroSZBernd.Defy, and junk031), with the first custom kernel for the device.

Loading the kernel itself is a little bit of a chore, as it must be live booted from a computer. The steps essentially involve fastboot booting to a custom recovery, pushing modules to the device, rebooting to bootloader, and fastboot booting the kernel’s boot.img. While this is definitely not for the lazy (or for those who frequently restart while on the go), it’s a healthy step of progress for the device.

If you’ve got yourself a Defy Mini and wish to load it with a custom kernel, head over to the development thread to get started.

Motorola-Defy-Mini-SmartPhone

XDA is a place where not only the newest devices get developer love. Some older phones like HTC HD2 and Google Nexus One have received unofficial updates to KitKat recently, and they are still full of interesting development projects. One of the devices that refuses to go into retirement is Motorola Defy Mini XT320, the younger brother of .

Motorola wasn’t always the Good Guy Greg of development, as they used to release their devices with locked bootloaders. Luckily, people like XDA Recognized Developer djrbliss managed to crack the bootloader and unleash the full potential of those devices. However, it still required some effort to flash a custom kernel. Basically, the older Motorolas always needed some tricky workaround to gain root access, and the Defy Mini was no exception.

XDA Senior Member rootdefyxt320 found a method to flash an older bootloader with a loophole in fastboot mode, which allows users to flash the recovery partition and gain full access to the phone. It sounds a bit weird especially in fastboot oem unlock times, but rootdefyxt320′s thorough guide makes things a lot easier to understand.

If own a Motorola Defy Mini XT320 or XT321 and want to give this method a shot, make your way to the original thread and get more information.

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The Motorola Defy Mini XT320 is not exactly a new device. In fact, coming out about a year and a quarter ago, most people who own it have already owned it for quite some time. However, sturdy devices are few and far between, especially in smaller sizes. Plus, the device is still being actively purchased in quite a few markets globally by those for whom small size and superior device sturdiness is important.

XDA Senior Member rootdefyxt320 has created an all-in-one script aimed at quickly and efficiently doing basically everything a new device owner would care to accomplish. Included in the tool’s functionality is the ability to root, install recovery, overclock, wipe, and unroot the device. Installation is as simple as running the EXE attached to the thread’s original post. From there, just select what you would like it to do from the application’s menu.

Whether you’re a new Defy Mini owner or just haven’t gotten around to rooting yet, head over to the utility thread to get started.

Root

As an almost exclusively Nexus device user, I have come to appreciate (and to some degree, expect) a friendly attitude towards aftermarket development and hacking from my device manufacturers. However, despite a certain OEM’s somewhat recent buyout, this isn’t always the case.

Thankfully, XDA Senior Member rootdefyxt320 has created a relatively quick guide that helps root quite a few Motorola devices—specifically those that use SBF firmware in CG2.smg format. The guide walks users through the process, starting with downloading and unpacking the SBF, to building your own CWM image, to using Elite Recognized Developer Chainfire’s SuperSU to achieve root access.

Thus far, this method has been tested on various Motorola devices, including the developer’s own Motorola Defy Mini XT320, as well as the Fire XT311, XT316, XT530, XT531, and Motoluxe XT615. However, it should work on most (if not all) devices that use SBF firmware packaged in CG2.smg format.

To give this a shot on your own Moto, head over to the original thread. If you try this on a device that hasn’t yet been tested, be sure to let rootdefyxt320 know how it goes! As always, though, proceed with caution when applying any modification—especially if it hasn’t yet been tested on your own device.

Update: It appears as if this root method only works on Qualcomm-based devices running Gingerbread, and it is not universal, as was originally thought. As stated by XDA Recognized Developer mattlgroff:

This is not for all Moto Qualcomms, either. It has been patched for a very long time and is the opposite of far reaching as the OP suggests.

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