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Posts Tagged: motorola droid razr

Droid Razr

EternityProject head developer, and also XDA Recognized Developer, kholk and his crew have brought a few really great things to the Motorola Droid RAZR in a relatively short period of time.

For starters, they’ve posted the Ice Cream Sandwich update for the GSM version of the RAZR, available immediately, in their thread about it here. Along with the download links is instructions on installation and screen shots. As stated, this is for the GSM version of the phone only, so those toting the CDMA model will have to wait just a little bit longer for theirs. Also, if you plan on checking it out, make sure you fulfill all the requirements before flashing.

Additionally, the team has brought an alternative to flashing official Motorola firmware that does not include the usual RSD. The process is pretty simple:

1. Copy the FastBoot package into the ROM you’ve extracted
2. Boot in AP FastBoot Mode
3. Connect your RAZR to the PC
4. Execute “FlashME.bat” (Windows) or “FlashNIX.sh” (Linux)
5. Enjoy!

You can find the download links for FlashME.bat and FlashNIX.sh in the original thread. Kholk and EternityProject say that this method will work with all bootloaders although it is aimed toward those who have the 0A.6C bootloader. So users can just download and go if they want to.

Droid-Razr4_610x458

Forum member daywalker04 has leaked fastboot files for the Motorola Droid RAZR. What does this mean? Basically, you can now flash anything you want without having to worry about causing bootloops or bricking your device, as you can safely revert back to stock by flashing these fastboot files.

Find download links in the forum thread.

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razr

XDA Recognized Developer nitroglycerine33 has created a bootstrap recovery for the super-thin Motorola Droid RAZR based off of Koush/CVPCS bootstrap for the Droid Bionic and modified for the RAZR. As long as your RAZR is rooted, you just need to follow four steps contained within the discussion thread, and your phone will boot into Clockworkmod Recovery.

This is a repost of a previous story which contained inaccurate information. 

Jsh9vl

Holiday season is OTA season! Motorola has officially announced an update for the Droid RAZR. The non-US versions, simply known as RAZR, also seem to be getting updates, according to reports in our forums. Even more good news: The update seems to be easily root-able.

Head over to this forum thread to report any issues. Full changelog below.

Data

  • Improved 4G data connectivity
  • Eliminated false SIM error messages
  • Improved performance for transition between 3G and 4G connections
  • Improved maintenance of network connection upon completion of a voice call
  • Enhanced Wi-Fi performance

Camera

  • Enhanced camera performance

Phone Stability

  • Resolved general stability issues in menu access. Browser, Phone Dialer, video playback and music player reducing Force Close errors and lockups.

Other

  • Improved readability for Lapdock™ email, SMS and social networking user interface menu items
  • Updated group message notifications
droid-razr

The uber-thin Motorola Droid RAZR, sold now on Verizon Wireless as an LTE phone and also as a worldwide unlocked GSM phone, claims to be able to get 12 hours of battery life. Achieving the full 12 hours is no easy task, and XDA member royalbloodvi has written a guide for RAZR owners who want to get the most battery life possible from their device.

Use the following settings:

  • 2g & Data connnection off when screen off (For e-mails, let autosync check every x minutes you would like)
  • 3g when specific apps need data connection on (for internet radios enable the screen on/off profile)
  • In-built setcpu function, set min/max to 300mhz on idle
  • Enable juicedefender to automatically handle 2g/3g networks
  • SMARTACTIONS: Display ON & OFF profile -> Disable background sync
  • Juicedefender in-built autobrightness, and tweak the settings below stock brightness
  • Enable juicedefender to manage wifi

Click on to the discussion thread!

razr_rezound_nexus

I was thinking about the HTC Rezound today.  I do that sometimes–sit down and let my thoughts wander. I thought about its three-way fight within Verizon against the Samsung Galaxy Nexus and Motorola Droid RAZR, and how it will fare this Christmas season.  I also thought about TrevE’s work on HTC’s astounding Carrier IQ screw-up. And I came up with a target market based on privacy and security to whom no manufacturer has managed to sell phones yet:  the hopeless-paranoid.

See, on one extreme, there’s the non-paranoid.  These people either think they have everything under control or don’t care if they have control.  They’re the ones who buy crappy phones on contract.  They have no interest in phones, it’s just something they use and could easily afford at the moment.

At the opposite extreme, there’s the empowered-paranoid.  These are developers and other early adopters who use independent development.  They constantly seek the best phones either because it shouldn’t have the flaws of crappier phones, or because, if it does have problems, they can do something about it and not feel like they’re wasting time developing for sub-par hardware.

If we imagine a square to give a two-dimensional range to my envisioned market, in another corner are the paranoid-curious.  These people don’t worry too much, but their brains pump out thoughts often enough that they can at least spare a few to consider the advice of developers and early adopters.  That means worrying about privacy and security to some degree.  They buy higher-end phones because the empowered-paranoid–who are, again, developers and early adopters–encourage it.

Then there’s the hopeless-paranoid.  These people have all the security and privacy concerns of developers, yet feel they have no way to correct it.  Which phones do they buy?  They don’t.  The only thing they know to do when they’re worried about their privacy is to avoid the thing that makes them worry.  They aren’t worried about specific security issues–they don’t actually know enough to worry like that.  They’re worried about everything.  They say things like, “I don’t want people to be able to call me no matter where I am.”   We’ve all heard lines like that, and we all know it’s silly.  If you don’t want to talk to people at a certain time, turn off your phone.  No, they’re worried about more than being so accessible.

Now, you may be asking, is there actually any reason to be paranoid?  I guess that depends.  I reread some of the articles egzthunder1 wrote covering all TrevE’s amazing work exposing the dirty little secrets of HTC and the carriers.  And while he focuses on HTC phones, make no mistake that other manufacturers are doing the same.

Nevermind the security flaws that allow any app with Internet access to intercept the data that Carrier IQ, HTCLogger, etc. collect.  HTC and the carriers collect enough data to know pretty much everything about your phone habits.  Verizon changed their privacy policy to say that while you can opt out of letting them sell your information to other companies, they’re still collecting and keeping that data.  And Sprint… Sprint doesn’t even let you opt out.  They’re giving away information about you to whomever they like.  That could be companies.  That could be law enforcement.  You don’t get to say who they give it to, you don’t get to say what information they give, and you don’t get to say that they cannot collect it.

So yes, I think paranoia is justified.  And thank goodness for all the developers that work so hard to strip Carrier IQ and their ilk from ROMs.  To a certain extent, thank goodness for the manufacturers and carriers that openly support development by not locking down devices.  To the carriers and manufacturers who try to keep us from developing their devices, let me introduce you to the above four target markets.  I suggest you change your minds.  To HTC specifically, we see how developer-friendly you’re trying to be, but we see your devotion to carriers like Verizon more.  You need to decide that Peter Chou lied and bootloaders will not be unlocked, or you need to stand up for yourselves.

There is a point to all this.  As I said, I was thinking about the HTC Rezound, announced last week.  And since it’s on Verizon, its bootloaders will probably be locked.  That’s a clear move to prevent development.  So do something for me:  pretend the bootloader can’t be unlocked through exploits.  We can’t get S-Off, we can’t get root, no custom bootloader, no custom kernels or custom ROMs.  To put it simply, developers can’t develop.  All that paranoia and nothing can be done about it.

Which of those four groups of people does that sound like?  That’s right.  The hopeless-paranoid.  The people who don’t buy phones.  Except, in this case, they don’t buy your phones.  The only difference is, developers influence the buying habits of that large group of paranoid-curious people. The HTC Rezound?  Great specs.  Too bad the bootloader won’t be unlocked.  And doubly too-bad, HTC, that you made the Rezound exclusively for Verizon, the US carrier certain to get the Samsung Galaxy Nexus.

Merry Christmas, HTC.  Perhaps you’ll remember us in your New Years resolutions.

logo

Our not-so-little-anymore family keeps growing, and at a fast pace, I might add. We have added 3 new forums to our beloved xda-developers: Nokia Lumia 800, Motorola Atrix 2, and Motorola Droid Razr. The latter was added this past weekend, but it is still worth mentioning it as it is the first device that will be released with the infamous “Razr” branding on it since its flip phone counter part. This device is rumored to be loaded with ICS as Moto is now “partnered” with Google, but the official specs claim that it will come with Gingerbread. Other outstanding specs from this device are its ridiculously thin profile of 7.1 mm, 4.3 in Super AMOLED screen, and dual core 1.2 GHz OMAP processor. It also weights a mere 126 gr with the battery on, just as much as the ham and turkey that you would get in a sub at Subway (and probably just as thin when stacked).

The second device is the Atrix 2, which as its name rightfully implies, is the continuation of the not-so successful-yet-revolutionary Atrix, which came with a laptop as a docking station. The device is not that much different from its predecessor but we are trying to keep up with the times. Last but not least, we say “welcome” to Nokia into our forums. As you may have heard, Nokia finally gave up and decided to partner up with Microsoft in attempts to try and promote the WP7 platform in this iOS/Android dominated market. The basic difference with other devices running WP7 out there is that this one has a much beefier processor, clocking at 1.4 GHz, which still is not the highest clock speed (Titan clocks at 1.5 GHz). Yet, it should provide enough oomph for the money.

Well, if you have any of these, please share your success/horror stories with the rest of our members as well as the tips, tricks, and hacks that you may find along the way.

You can find the Lumia home on xda here.

You can find the Atrix 2 home on xda here.

You can find the Razr home on xda here.

Want something published in the Portal? Contact any News Writer.

Source: Engadget

When you have to deliver bad news, the best way to do it is to say a lot of other things in the same breath.  This is best because people usually forget the bad news you just gave them by the time you finish your long, wordy announcement.

This rhetorical tactic actually works.  You’ll find it often in political speeches, public relations damage control, and in the stuttering explanations of children whose hands are caught in cookie jars.  If you ever need to use it yourself, make sure you do so in a place where you can use a lot of words.  Twitter is not that place.

Someone probably should’ve told that to Motorola.  Responding to a tweet about whether the Droid RAZR would come with an unlocked bootloader, Motorola said this:

The bootloader was locked per the carrier, in addition to meeting security, safety and regulatory guidelines.

I understand that there’s a delicate balance between carriers and manufacturers.  In fact, I’d love to hear Motorola blame Verizon some more.  I know I’d personally join Motorola’s movement to stand up against the tyranny of Verizon.  But if Motorola is not at fault, why do they feel the need to tell us about all sorts of good things they’re doing in addition to locking their bootloaders? Why do they feel the need to cover up the bad news with unnecessary verbiage?

I don’t buy it, Motorola.  You have a history of keeping bootloaders locked, with the exception of the XOOM, and if you’re willing to throw Verizon under the bus, I think you should go with them.  I suppose we’ll find out more at the joint Motorola-Verizon event today, where they are presenting the Droid RAZR.

Source: @Motorola
Via:  AndroidCentral
Image Source: Engadget

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